Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using templates for my struct like:

#pragma pack(push, 1)
template <typename T>
struct S
{
   T t;

   inline void Set(const T& val) { t = val; }
}
#pragma pack(pop)

T can be an float, int, short or char[10], char[1] or char[2] (and preferably any length would be great).

While the above seems to work quite nicely for the integral types, I'm having difficulty implementing the char[n] portion in that:

  1. I need to use strncpy or memcpy instead of the assignment operator
  2. Using the above, the compiler complains about the signature (const char[2]& val) and my calling it via s.Set("T").
  3. The interface between S with integral and character types has to be same as it's generic code that is calling them (and it doesn't care what type they are).
share|improve this question
    
Why char[]s and not std::strings? You would not have these issues. –  Mat Oct 31 '11 at 18:48
    
@Mat It's used in the context of packed structs to be put directly on the wire and std::string won't work for this purpose unfortunately. –  chriskirk Oct 31 '11 at 18:50
    
You can still use a std::string for your Set method. –  Mat Oct 31 '11 at 18:52
    
@Mat not sure I'm following. Doesn't the parameter type in the Set method need to be the same as typename T? –  chriskirk Oct 31 '11 at 18:53
    
@Mat: That won't take a short. Christkirk: Yes it does. See my answer, your code is fine. –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 18:54
show 1 more comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can define template specializations for T in the case of char[10], etc. Do any issues remain when you do that? But as Mat has already noted, using a string is an approach worth considering.

#include <iostream>

#pragma pack(push, 1)
template <typename T>
struct S
{
   T t;

   inline void Set(const T& val) { std::cout << "general\n"; }
};

template <int len>
struct S<char[len]>
{
   char t[len];

   inline void Set(const std::string& val) { std::cout << "specialization\n"; }
};
#pragma pack(pop)

int main() {

    S<int> a;
    a.Set(10);

    S<char[20]> b;
    b.Set("turkey!");

    return 0;
}

http://codepad.org/X8YVuFja output:

general
specialization

share|improve this answer
    
I guess my issue is with C++ template syntax more than the concept. Would you care to provide an example of such specialization? –  chriskirk Oct 31 '11 at 18:50
    
@chriskirk: specialization effectively comes down to writing the class once for integral types, and once for char arrays. That is avoidable, but can also make things easier. –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 18:56
    
@MooingDuck is it also possible to have std::string in the method signature for all specialization of type char[n]? I think from the end-user perspective it would be a bit more convenient. –  chriskirk Oct 31 '11 at 18:58
    
@chriskirk: Sure. There's nothing that says that a specialization has to have anything in common with the generic other than the fully qualified class name. –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 18:59
    
@MooingDuck Would you please care to provide an example of this? I'm very intrigued indeed =) –  chriskirk Oct 31 '11 at 19:01
show 2 more comments

Well, a partial specialization might do the trick:

template <typename T> struct S
{
  T x;
  void set(const T & y) { x = y; }
};

template <typename T, unsigned int N> struct S<T[N]>
{
  T x[N];
  void set(const T (&y)[N]) { std::copy(y, y + N, x); }
};

Usage:

S<char[10]> b;
char c[10] = "Hello";
b.set(c);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Works fine for me: http://codepad.org/03FSqZC6

#pragma pack(push, 1)
template <typename T>
struct S
{
   T t;

   inline void Set(const T& val) {}
};
#pragma pack(pop)

int main() {
    typedef char (carray)[10];  //do you have a line like this?
    S<carray> lhs;
    carray rhs = "HELLO";
    lhs.Set(rhs);
    return 0;
}

Most likely your problem is caused by using the incorrect array type. See my code for an example of a correct typedef.

EDIT:

I just realized this becomes a pain to call Set if you already have a std::string or dynamic array of any sort. Do the template specialization.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach. I wasn't using a typedef the way you outlined. –  chriskirk Oct 31 '11 at 18:56
1  
typedefs make arrays and pointers easier. Use them. :D –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 18:58
    
Are you sure this is doing what you think it does? –  Kerrek SB Oct 31 '11 at 19:10
    
@KerrekSB: You make fewer mistakes than I do, but according to codepad.org/3DXoBLTf the sizes of S, lhs,rhs, and val are all 10. What did I miss? –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 19:20
    
Well, your Set function is currently empty, so it's definitely not doing the right thing. The question is, how would the correct implementation look like? –  Kerrek SB Oct 31 '11 at 19:26
show 7 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.