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I found a simple class, the follow:

abstract class SingleTon {
    /**
     * Prevents direct creation of object.
     *
     * @param  void
     * @return void
     */
    final protected function __construct() {}

    /**
     * Prevents to clone the instance.
     *
     * @param  void
     * @return void
     */    
    final protected function __clone() {}

    /**
     * Gets a single instance of the class the static method is called in.
     *
     * See the {@link http://php.net/lsb Late Static Bindings} feature for more
     * information.
     *
     * @param  void
     * @return object Returns a single instance of the class.
     */
    final static public function getInstance(){
        static $instance = null;

        return $instance ?: $instance = new static;
    }
}

the question is, is there a sense to use abstract class SingleTon instead of class SingleTon ? I mean...

As you can see the _construct is protected and _clone too. As far I understand what "abstract" means for me is pointeless to use abstract because I already cannot instantiate the class, no?

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Not sure of your doubt... abstract is used to extend the class, not to instantiate it :-? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Oct 31 '11 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

Cloning a singleton wouldn't make much sense - then you'd have a doubleton and it wouldn't be a singleton anymore. As well, protecting the constructor makes sense as well, since the only thing this class does is create the singleton at the time getInstance() is called for the first time.

It's not unreasonable for someone to instantiate the object, yet not need the singleton'd object until later, so placing the actual initialization logic into the getInstance method makes sense - that delays the creation of the singleton'd object to be as late as possible.

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thanks! and what about abstract? do i have to use it to create the class? –  Dail Oct 31 '11 at 19:21
    
abstract just means you can't instantiate this object - it just defines some interfaces/methods but is not functional on its own. You CAN inherit this abstract class into another one to create an actual concrete class. class MySingleTon extends SingleTon {}; $mst = new MySingleTon() would work: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.abstract.php –  Marc B Oct 31 '11 at 19:23

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