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What is the simplest most basic way to find out if a number/variable is odd or even in PHP? Is it something to do with mod?

I've tried a few scripts but.. google isn't delivering at the moment.

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1  
mod is the generic shorthand term for 'modulo', aka modular arithmetic –  Marc B Oct 31 '11 at 20:20

10 Answers 10

up vote 217 down vote accepted

You were right in thinking mod was a good place to start. Here is an expression which will return true if $number is even, false if odd:

$number % 2 == 0

Works for every integerPHP value, see as well Arithmetic OperatorsPHP.

Example:

$number = 20;
if ($number % 2 == 0) {
  print "It's even";
}

Output:

It's even

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4  
If you use this in loops or large quantities, you might want to consider the bitcheck suggested by Arius2038, which is very fast. The bitcheck is my prefered method for odd/even checks. –  Martijn Jul 3 '13 at 9:48
    
Works fine but I'm just wondering whats the logic behind this? Why is it that a value of true is given if "10 == 0" ? –  snlan Sep 24 '14 at 11:42
    
The logic is that any even number is divisible by 2 with no remainder. If you used $number % 10, and your $number was 20, it would return true, but not if your $number was 22. You could use $number % 10 if you were trying to find every 10th item in a loop for example. –  crdunst Sep 25 '14 at 15:33
    
@Tim, if 5%2=1. The logica is 2*2+1=5.How to get the 2 in php? –  Hendry Tanaka Oct 23 '14 at 2:22
1  
@Hendry - what are you asking exactly? How to get the quotient for a division as a whole number, or...? If that is what you mean, you just need to floor() the result; floor(5/2)=2 –  Joey Sabey Mar 20 at 14:25

Another option is a simple bit checking.

n & 1

for example:

if ( $num & 1 ) {
  //odd
} else {
  //even
}
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1  
this is the fastest way I think. –  ocanal Feb 5 '12 at 23:14
    
This would definitely be the fastest way when using integers in a language like C, by a large margin. Has anyone done benchmarks to determine if this is true also for PHP? –  thomasrutter Dec 5 '13 at 0:03
    
It's probably the fastest way, if the PHP engine was well coded. –  Rolf Dec 18 '13 at 16:19
    
I'd say this is the fastest and most straight forward way. Perfect. –  Robbiegod Mar 27 '14 at 19:03
    
Work perfect & very fast... –  user3087089 Mar 29 '14 at 14:22

Yes using the mod

$even = ($num % 2 == 0);
$odd = ($num % 2 != 0);
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(bool)($number & 1)

or

(bool)(~ $number & 1)
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1  
This is a bitwise operator I believe so unless you know what you're doing with that fancyness, I would avoid this syntax. –  danhere Dec 12 '13 at 20:41

Another option is to check if the last digit is an even number :

$value = "1024";// A Number
$even = array(0, 2, 4, 6, 8);
if(array_search(substr($value, -1),$even)){
  // Even Number
}else{
  // Odd Number
}

Or to make it faster, use isset() instead of array_search :

$value = "1024";// A Number
$even = array(0 => 1, 2 => 1, 4 => 1, 6 => 1, 8 => 1);
if(isset($even[substr($value, -1)]){
  // Even Number
}else{
  // Odd Number
}

Here is the time test; Execution using mod and isset has only a slight difference.

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To Downvoter : May I please know why you downvoted ? –  Subin Mar 3 '14 at 13:58
    
It's very expensive, compared to other methods. –  grantwparks Apr 22 at 17:02
    
@grantwparks Well, the difference between using isset & mod is only 0.5007 seconds. But, array_search is very expensive. –  Subin Apr 24 at 5:37
    
Those aren't seconds in the test, they're actually much less. So on the surface, it sounds reasonable. But think of this: in the results, mod came out at 2.0xxxx units of time. While isset came out at 2.5xxxx units of time. That's a 25% increase in execution time. How reasonable does it sound now ;) –  grantwparks 2 days ago
    
@grantwparks Well, you're right. This answer is only for information and I suggest using mod. –  Subin 18 hours ago

I did a bit of testing, and found that between mod, is_int and the &-operator, mod is the fastest, followed closely by the &-operator. is_int is nearly 4 times slower than mod.

I used the following code for testing purposes:

$number = 13;

$before = microtime(true);
for ($i=0; $i<100000; $i++) {
    $test = ($number%2?true:false);
}
$after = microtime(true);

echo $after-$before." seconds mod<br>";

$before = microtime(true);
for ($i=0; $i<100000; $i++) {
    $test = (!is_int($number/2)?true:false);
}
$after = microtime(true);

echo $after-$before." seconds is_int<br>";

$before = microtime(true);
for ($i=0; $i<100000; $i++) {
    $test = ($number&1?true:false);
}
$after = microtime(true);

echo $after-$before." seconds & operator<br>";

The results I got were pretty consistent. Here's a sample:

0.041879177093506 seconds mod
0.15969395637512 seconds is_int
0.044223070144653 seconds & operator
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1  
on my server ( 5.4.4 / cli / no opcache / i7 ) the "&" is about 10% faster then mod ( tested on array with random integer values ) –  Pawel Dubiel Dec 5 '13 at 9:08

All even numbers divided by 2 will result in an integer

$number = 4;
if(is_int($number/2))
{
   echo("Integer");
}
else
{
   echo("Not Integer");
}
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2  
while it will work it's not the best way to do that –  Niko Sams Oct 10 '12 at 20:26
//for numbers n [0,1,2,3,4....]

if((n+2)%2==1) {
   //odd
}else {
  //even
}

Zero is an even number. In other words, its parity—the quality of an integer being even or odd—is even. The simplest way to prove that zero is even is to check that it fits the definition of "even": it is an integer multiple of 2, specifically 0 × 2. As a result, zero shares all the properties that characterize even numbers: 0 is divisible by 2, 0 is surrounded on both sides by odd numbers, 0 is the sum of an integer (0) with itself, and a set of 0 objects can be split into two equal sets. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parity_of_zero

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I don't understand. Why (n+2) % 2 ? In which cases does it return something different than n % 2 ? –  Pierre-Olivier Vares Mar 31 at 8:55

This code checks if the number is odd or even in PHP. In the example $a is 2 and you get even number. If you need odd then change the $a value

$a=2;
if($a %2 == 0){
    echo "<h3>This Number is <b>$a</b> Even</h3>";
}else{
    echo "<h3>This Number is <b>$a</b> Odd</h3>";
}
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I am making an assumption that there is a counter already in place. in $i which is incremented at the end of a loop, This works for me using a shorthand query.

$row_pos = ($i & 1) ? 'odd' : 'even';

So what does this do, well it queries the statement we are making in essence $i is odd, depending whether its true or false will decide what gets returned. The returned value populates our variable $row_pos

My use of this is to place it inside the foreach loop, right before i need it, This makes it a very efficient one liner to give me the appropriate class names, this is because i already have a counter for the id's to make use of later in the program. This is a brief example of how i will use this part.

<div class='row-{$row_pos}'> random data <div>

This gives me odd and even classes on each row so i can use the correct class and stripe my printed results down the page.

The full example of what i use note the id has the counter applied to it and the class has my odd/even result applied to it.:

$i=0;
foreach ($a as $k => $v) {

    $row_pos = ($i & 1) ? 'odd' : 'even';
    echo "<div id='A{$i}' class='row-{$row_pos}'>{$v['f_name']} {$v['l_name']} - {$v['amount']} - {$v['date']}</div>\n";

$i++;
}

in summary, this gives me a very simple way to create a pretty table.

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