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ok so i define my structure like this.

    struct trie {
        struct trie *child[26];
        int count;
        char letter;
    };

the problem is when i try to fill my trie with words i get a segmentation fault. ive been told that the problem is that the child variable isn't pointing to anything and setting them to NULL would fix this. Also creating a second structure would be a good way to achieve this. i am new to C programming and am confused on how to create a second structure to achieve this. any help would be much appreciated.

int addWordOccurrence(const char* word)
{

    struct trie *root;
    root = (struct trie *)malloc(sizeof(struct trie*));
    struct trie *initRoot=root;
    int count;

    int x=strlen(word);
    printf("%d",x);
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<x; i++)
    {  
        int z=word[i]-97;
        if(word[i]=='\n')
        {
            z=word[i-1]-97;
            root->child[z]->count++;
            root=initRoot;
        }

        root->child[z] = (struct trie *)malloc(sizeof(struct trie));
        root->child[z]->letter=word[i];
        root->child[z]=root;
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
You have to allocate memory for the pointers in child. Do you know malloc/calloc? Or you create other tries and put them in. Can you show us your code? –  birryree Oct 31 '11 at 20:57
2  
Is this C or C++? The answers will differ wildly. –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 20:57
3  
Where is the code for filling your trie? –  Tim Cooper Oct 31 '11 at 20:58
    
yes i use malloc in my method that adds the words to the trie. –  Relics Oct 31 '11 at 20:59
1  
The struct definition looks OK (though I don't know what count is for), but you haven't posted the code for inserting, and that's where the problem is. Please post that code. –  Omnifarious Oct 31 '11 at 20:59
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
root->child[z] = (struct trie *)malloc(sizeof(struct trie));
root->child[z]->letter=word[i];
root->child[z]=root;

This is problematic.
1) What if child[z] was already set?
2) You never set child[z]->child or child[z]->count to anything

#2 is causing your segfaults, #1 is a memory leak.

My solution would be to write a function for allocating new children:

struct trie* newtrie(char newchar) {
    struct trie* r = malloc(sizeof(struct trie));
    memset(r, 0, sizeof(struct trie));
    r->letter = newchar;
    return r;
}

Then your code would become:

    if (root->child[z] == NULL)
        root->child[z] = newtrie(word[i]);
    root->child[z]=root;

You also have to change the malloc of root:

struct trie *root = newtrie(0);

Which is more clear, and avoids the errors I mentioned. http://codepad.org/J6oFQJMb No segfaults after 6 or so calls.

I've also noticed that your code mallocs a new root, but never returns it, so nobody except this function can ever see it. This is also a memory leak.

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how would i fix this? –  Relics Oct 31 '11 at 21:11
    
should i use malloc for the children when i define the structure? –  Relics Oct 31 '11 at 21:20
    
ug i appreciate your help, maybe im just implementing it wrong but i am still getting the seg fault –  Relics Oct 31 '11 at 21:33
    
Mark, you might be implementing it in the wrong way or you might have misunderstood the answer. I think you should edit your question and add more information (for example put there the new version of your source code) and you'll suddenly get much more answers. –  Lajos Arpad Oct 31 '11 at 22:02
    
Mooing Duck, you are amazing. thank you! –  Relics Nov 1 '11 at 2:19
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In addition to @MooingDuck's answer, there is another problem with your code here:

int addWordOccurrence(const char* word)
{

    struct trie *root;
    root = (struct trie *)malloc(sizeof(struct trie*));
    struct trie *initRoot=root;
    int count;
    /* ... */
}

You did a

root = (struct trie *)malloc(sizeof(struct trie*));

but you really mean to allocate the `sizeof(struct trie), and not sizeof a pointer (which will likely be 4 or 8 if you're on x86 or x86_64).

This is better (don't need explicit cast of malloc's return pointer in C, and you can do sizeof like this:

struct tree *root = malloc(sizeof(*root));
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