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I was given a little library by my school to do some projects in. The library was written with linux in mind, so I'm trying to change some things to work with my MinGW compiler. One particular program is for reading files given a URL. I had to change stat to _stat to make it work properly. Opening a file works fine but _stat seems to return the incorrect value. I'll include the relevant code below:

#ifdef WIN32
    #define stat _stat
#endif

    //return true if the number of chars read is the same as the file size
bool IsDone() const
{
    cout << "checking if numRead " << numRead << " is fileSize " << fileSize << endl;
    return (numRead == fileSize);
}

char Read()
{
    if (IsDone())
        throw IllegalStateException("stream is done");
    else
    {
        char c;
        file.get(c);
        cout << "reading: " << c << endl;
        if (file.fail())
            throw FileException(std::string("error reading from file ") + fileName);

        ++numRead;
        return c;
    }
}

void OpenFile(string fileName)
{
    struct stat buf;
    #ifdef WIN32
        if (_stat(fileName.c_str(), &buf) < 0){
            switch (errno){
                case ENOENT:
                  throw FileException(std::string("Could not find file ") + name);
                case EINVAL:
                    throw FileException(std::string("Invalid parameter to _stat.\n"));
                default:
                  /* Should never be reached. */
                    throw FileException(std::string("Unexpected error in _stat.\n"));
            }
        }
    #else
        if (stat(fileName.c_str(), &buf) < 0)
            throw FileException(std::string("could not determine size of file ") + fileName);
    #endif
        fileSize = buf.st_size;
        file.open(fileName.c_str());
}

If you would like to see the entire library, you can get them from here. I understand that the code is gross looking; I'm just trying to cludge a working windows version. This thing works fine on Linux; the problem is that when I read in a file on Windows, the size is 1 short for every newline that I use in the input file, so that if I have a file that looks like this:

 text

It works fine, but with:

text\r\n

It breaks, and the output looks like this:

checking if numRead 0 is fileSize 6
checking if numRead 0 is fileSize 6
reading: t
checking if numRead 1 is fileSize 6
checking if numRead 1 is fileSize 6
reading: e
checking if numRead 2 is fileSize 6
checking if numRead 2 is fileSize 6
reading: x
checking if numRead 3 is fileSize 6
checking if numRead 3 is fileSize 6
reading: t
checking if numRead 4 is fileSize 6
checking if numRead 4 is fileSize 6
reading:

checking if numRead 5 is fileSize 6
checking if numRead 5 is fileSize 6
reading:
File Error: error reading from file H:/test/data/stuff.txt

It breaks because IsDone() falsely returns false (no pun intented), and the program tries to read past the end of the file. Any suggestions on why _stat is returning an incorrect number when there's a newline?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What _stat is returning is quite correct. Windows uses "\r\n" to signal the end of a line, but when you open a file in text mode, that will be converted to a single new-line character as you read the stream.

If you want the stream you read to match the external length, open the file in binary mode instead.

If you'll pardon my saying so, once you're done with that, my advice would be to throw this code away, and change your name so if somebody sees your post, they won't blame you for it. What you have here is a lot of code that seems, at least to me, to make a simple task considerably more complex and difficult.

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The size of the file and the logical size of the data in the file need not be the same. In this case, "test\ntest\n" has the same logical data as "test\r\ntest\r\n", yet the former is two bytes shorter. One simply uses a single byte to encode the end of a line and the latter uses two bytes to do so. If you care about this difference, you need to read the file in a way that also cares. (Ideally, not line by line.) –  David Schwartz Oct 31 '11 at 22:37
    
@Jerry Coffin:Don't mind you saying so. I'm going to edit the question to be more focused and not have the pile of junk code (which is something somebody else wrote that I'm cludging into working on Windows). –  Nate Glenn Oct 31 '11 at 22:44

Looks to me like you should open the file with binary mode. No idea why you need to use stat to read a file and in the Windows version of your code, you call _stat and then stat again.

There are a few ways to do this in Windows. My personal preference is to use something like:

char strBuffer[1024];

FILE *fp = fopen (file,"rb");  // Binary read mode
while (!feof (fp))
   fread (strBuffer,1,sizeof (strBuffer),fp);

fclose (fp);
share|improve this answer
    
Oh no. His code is a really long, roundabout way of getting there, but it at least looks like it could be correct. The loop above is just plain wrong. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 31 '11 at 22:50
    
It's only an extract, not a solution. I was just trying to point him in a different direction. Obviously he needs to do extra checking like ensuring fp is not NULL after the fopen and then he needs to get the number of bytes fread read and store strBuffer somewhere on each iteration so he has the full contents of the file. –  rushman Oct 31 '11 at 23:03
    
It may be an extract, but not from code that actually works. Read the linked rant. As I pointed out there, a loop of the form while (!feof(whatever)) is essentially always wrong. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 31 '11 at 23:05
    
Interesting rant. I've used this way loads of times and never had issues. Maybe I missed it, but I did not see any explanation of why this does not work or what the corner cases are. What's the point of feof if it doesn't work? –  rushman Oct 31 '11 at 23:10
    
Even Microsoft have an example that does exactly this. Now ok, it's Microsoft, but I cannot see why this would not work. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xssktc6e%28v=VS.71%29.aspx –  rushman Oct 31 '11 at 23:12

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