Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data.table with two columns: one ID column and one value column. I want to split up the table by the ID column and run a function foo on the value column. This works fine as long as foo does not return NAs. In that case, I get an error that tells me that the types of the groups are not consistent. My assumption is that - since is.logical(NA) equals TRUE and is.numeric(NA) equals FALSE, data.table internally assumes that I want to combine logical values with numeric ones and returns an error. However, I find this behavior peculiar. Any comments on that? Do I miss something obvious here or is that indeed intended behavior? If so, a short explanation would be great. (Notice that I do know a work-around: just let foo2 return a complete improbable number and filter for that later. However, this seems bad coding).

Here is the example:

library(data.table)
foo1 <- function(x) {if (mean(x) < 5) {return(1)} else {return(2)}}
foo2 <- function(x) {if (mean(x) < 5) {return(1)} else {return(NA)}}
DT <- data.table(ID=rep(c("A", "B"), each=5), value=1:10)
DT[, foo1(value), by=ID] #Works perfectly
     ID V1
[1,]  A  1
[2,]  B  2
DT[, foo2(value), by=ID] #Throws error
Error in `[.data.table`(DT, , foo2(value), by = ID) : 
columns of j don't evaluate to consistent types for each group: result for group 2 has column 1 type 'logical' but expecting type 'numeric'
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can fix this by specifying that your function should return an NA_real_, rather than an NA of the default type.

foo2 <- function(x) {if (mean(x) < 5) {return(1)} else {return(NA)}}
DT[, foo2(value), by=ID] #Throws error
# Error in `[.data.table`(DT, , foo2(value), by = ID) : 
# columns of j don't evaluate to consistent types for each group: 
# result for group 2 has column 1 type 'logical' but expecting type 'numeric'

foo3 <- function(x) {if (mean(x) < 5) {return(1)} else {return(NA_real_)}}
DT[, foo3(value), by=ID] #Works
#      ID V1
# [1,]  A  1
# [2,]  B NA

Incidentally the message that foo2() gives when it fails is nicely informative. It essentially tells you that your NA is of the wrong type. To fix the problem, you just need to look for the NA constant of the right type (or class):

NAs <- list(NA, NA_integer_, NA_real_, NA_character_, NA_complex_)
data.frame(contantName = sapply(NAs, deparse), 
           class       = sapply(NAs, class),
           type        = sapply(NAs, typeof))

#     contantName     class      type
# 1            NA   logical   logical
# 2   NA_integer_   integer   integer
# 3      NA_real_   numeric    double
# 4 NA_character_ character character
# 5   NA_complex_   complex   complex
share|improve this answer
    
The more I work with R, the more I realize how much stuff I just don't know. This `NA_real_' trick is definitely one of it. So thanks @Josh O'Brien, great answer. –  Christoph_J Oct 31 '11 at 23:33
    
Thanks. I added a bit more about NA constants to my answer since this has often been useful to me, and it's an aspect of NA values that is typically invisible to users. Which is just as it should be! –  Josh O'Brien Oct 31 '11 at 23:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.