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I have a <div> block with some fancy visual content that I don't want to change. I want to make it a clickable link.

I'm looking for something like <a href="…"><div> … </div></a>, but that is valid XHTML 1.1.

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3  
You want the entire contents of the div to be clickable? Using only html? –  jjnguy Apr 28 '09 at 3:17
3  
what are the reasons for doing this? there was <a> tag for that –  Dels Apr 28 '09 at 5:15
54  
one good reason would be a background image in the div –  Simon_Weaver Mar 3 '11 at 3:06
    
I have a good working example based on the most voted answer. Check the fiddle here –  Mike Apr 30 at 16:08
    
In HTML5 it is perfectly valid to have a div under an a. –  Juan A. Navarro Aug 8 at 14:51

22 Answers 22

Came here in the hope of finding a better solution that mine, but I don't like any of the ones on offer here. I think some of you have misunderstood the question. The OP wants to make a div full of content behave like a link. One example of this would be facebook ads - if you look, they're actually proper markup.

For me the no-nos are: javascript (shouldn't be needed just for a link, and very bad SEO/accessibility); invalid HTML.

In essence it's this:

  • Build your panel using normal CSS techniques and valid HTML.
  • Somewhere in there put a link that you want to be the default link if the user clicks on the panel (you can have other links too).
  • Inside that link, put an empty span tag (<span></span>, not <span /> - thanks @Campey)
  • give the panel position:relative
  • apply the following CSS to the empty span:

    { 
      position:absolute; 
      width:100%;
      height:100%;
      top:0;
      left: 0;
    
      /* edit: added z-index */
      z-index: 1;
    
      /* edit: fixes overlap error in IE7/8, 
         make sure you have an empty gif */
      background-image: url('empty.gif');
    }   
    

    It will now cover the panel, and as it's inside an <A> tag, it's a clickable link

  • give any other links inside the panel position:relative and a suitable z-index (>1) to bring them in front of the default span link

Edit: removed site I referenced, as it has changed beyond all recognition.

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33  
Very elegant! This should be the accepted answer. –  Ardee Aram Jan 26 '11 at 7:23
6  
Thanks works well. If things break horribly (like they did for me) in IE8, make sure you have an opening and closing span tag (<span...></span>), instead of an empty span (<span... />). –  Campey Nov 11 '11 at 14:32
1  
The code doesn't work entirely in IE7/8, other elements that are selectable take precedence over the <a><span></span></a> element. I.e. images and texts inside the container won't link even if the z-index is set. –  Spoike Mar 1 '12 at 10:00
23  
A fiddle for people who are silly like me and misread something so had to play around with it a bit: jsfiddle.net/hf75B/1 –  AlexMA Jun 23 '12 at 21:46
6  
Have you tried this in IE9? I like this method, and I am using it, but I just tested it (including the fiddle from @AlexMA) in IE9, and what I'm seeing is that you can click anywhere in the div EXCEPT on the text. When you hover over the text, the cursor changes to a standard text cursor and it does nothing when you click on the text. As users are prone to click on text elements (and when the text elements fill up most of the div), it makes this solution unusable in IE9. Has anyone else experienced this or have a solution? –  bigmac Sep 12 '12 at 22:03

You can't make the div a link itself, but you can make an <a> tag act as a block, the same behaviour a <div> has.

a {
    display: block;
}

You can then set the width and height on it.

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6  
However, this doesn't make a 'div' into a link. It makes a link into a block element. It's a bit different. –  jjnguy Apr 28 '09 at 3:35
1  
jjnguy: How? I dislike having lots of content in a link, but this could just as well be part of a navigation menu or something like that. An anchor element (<a>) doesn't necessarily have to be plain text, does it? In which way is it wrong to make it into a block? It's semantically correct and it can be used to display it as you want. –  Arve Systad Apr 28 '09 at 15:31
13  
This is a perfectly valid solution to a vague question. You actually COULD simply wrap an anchor element around a div, but that would be semantically incorrect. (Block element within inline element). –  Traingamer Apr 28 '09 at 18:08
3  
jjnguy: This is pretty common practice. I'm not saying replace divs with links, but by the sounds of the question he just wanted a block he could click like a button or something. –  Soviut Apr 29 '09 at 1:42
10  
This solution is valid, both as working, and as good practice (nothing wrong with it). –  Hugo Nov 15 '10 at 10:53

This is an ancient question, but I thought I'd answer it since everyone here has some crazy solutions. It's actually very very simple...

An anchor tag works like this -

<a href="whatever you want"> EVERYTHING IN HERE TURNS INTO A LINK </a>

Sooo...

<a href="whatever you want">n <div id="thediv"></div> </a>

Although I'm not sure if this is valid. If that's the reasoning behind spoken solutions, then I apologise...

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2  
It's valid HTML as long as the <div> doesn't contain any interactive content (other <a> elements, <button> elements, etc.). –  user113292 Apr 14 '11 at 1:23
    
So I guess it's the perfect answer... –  Zizo47 Apr 14 '11 at 1:44
27  
Your example is not valid HTML - block element contained in an inline element - unless you're using HTML5, which has made an exception for links. –  thepeer Sep 22 '11 at 13:27
1  
a #thediv{font-weight:normal;text-decoration:none;} is all you need style-wise. –  tyjkenn Jun 17 '12 at 4:21
2  
I wish I could upvote this more than once -- this is valid HTML (as long as you have an HTML5 doctype, as @thepeer points out). –  Paul d'Aoust Jan 9 at 18:35

Requires a little javascript. But, your div would be clickable.

<div onclick="location.href='http://www.example.com';" style="cursor:pointer;"></div>
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5  
Results in bad semantics on the page though, so I'd avoid this one even though it is technically possible. –  Arve Systad Apr 28 '09 at 15:29
1  
Functional, but not really in the spirit of the question which is for an XHTML solution. –  Soviut Apr 29 '09 at 1:44
1  
I thought about using this solution, but it's kind of ugly. I like the solutions involving display: block better. –  allyourcode Oct 30 '09 at 20:46
5  
This looks like a link, but isn't a real link. It has severe usability and accesibility issues, and is a really nasty solution. –  Hugo Jun 15 '12 at 16:39
1  
If your manager tells you to do it asap tell him its bad semantics lol –  Bill K Feb 12 at 15:56

This is a "valid" solution to achieving what you want.

<style type="text/css">
.myspan {
    display: block;
}
</style>
<a href="#"><span class="myspan">text</span></a>

But most-likely what you really want is to have an <a> tag displayed as a block level element.

I would not advise using JavaScript to simulate a hyperlink as that defeats the purpose of markup validation, which is ultimately to promote accessibility (publishing well-formed documents following proper semantic rules minimizes the possibility the same document will be interpreted differently by different browsers).

It would be preferable to publish a web page that does not validate, but renders and functions properly on all browsers, including ones with JavaScript disabled. Furthermore, using onclick does not provide the semantic information for a screen reader to determine that the div is functioning as a link.

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+1 Really elegant solution. Thanks for the superb answer :) –  Sushant Gupta May 1 '13 at 12:04

To make thepeer's answer work in IE 7 and forward, it needs a few tweaks.

  1. IE will not honour z-index if the element is has no background-color, so the link will not overlap parts of the containig div that has content, only the blank parts. To fix this a background is added with opacity 0.

  2. For some reason IE7 and various compatibility modes completely fail when using the span in a link approach. However if the link itself is given the style it works just fine.

.blockLink  
{  
    position:absolute;  
    top:0;  
    left: 0;  
    width:100%;  
    height:100%;  
    z-index: 1;  
    background-color:#ffffff;   
    -ms-filter:"progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity=0)";  
    filter: alpha(opacity=0);  
    opacity:0;  
}
<div style="position:relative">  
    <some content>  
    <a href="somepage" class="blockLink" />  
<div>
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First time posting, not only here but anywhere on a programming forum so go easy on me. Not sure if this is valid but it worked for me.

The code :

  <div style='position:relative;background-color:#000000;width:600px;height:30px;border:solid;'>
    <p style='display:inline;color:#ffffff;float:left;'>Whatever</p>     
    <a style='position:absolute;top:0px;left:0px;width:100%;height:100%;display:inline;' href ='#'></a>
  </div>
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1  
With slight modification, that solution worked perfectly. Thanks! –  Shane Smith Aug 10 '12 at 9:12

you could also try by wrapping an anchor, then turning its height and width to be the same with its parent. This works for me perfectly.

<div id="css_ID">
    <a href="http://www.your_link.com" style="display:block; height:100%; width:100%;"></a>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
You might also want to make sure the parent div has zero padding and that the <a> tag has zero margin. –  Nilpo Aug 23 '12 at 21:39

This post is Old I know but I just had to fix the same issue because simply writing a normal link tag with the display set to block does not make the whole div clickable in IE. so to fix this issue far simpler than having to use JQuery.

Firstly let us understand why this happens: IE wont make an empty div clickable it only make the text/image within that div/a tag clickable.

Solution: Fill the div with a bakground image and hide it from the viewer.

How? You ask good questions, now listen up. add this backround style to the a tag

> "background:url('some_small_image_path')
> -2000px -2000px no-repeat;"

And there you have it the whole div is now clickable. This was the best way for me cause Im using it for my Photo Gallery to let the user clik on one half of the image to move left/right and then place a small image as well just for visual effects. so for me I used the left and right images as background images anyway!

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Thanks! I needed to simulate an imagemap with empty anchors over an image and IE would only let you click if there was content. This fixed it. –  MDCore Dec 6 '10 at 13:44

The cleanest way would be to use jQuery with the data-tags introduced in HTML. With this solution you can create a link on every tag you want. First define the tag (e.g. div) with a data-link tag:

HTML:
-------------
<div data-link="http://www.google.at/">Some content in the div which is arbitrary</div>

Now you can style the div however you want. And you have to create also the style for the "link"-alike behavior:

CSS:
-------------
[data-link] {
    cursor: pointer;
}

And at last put this jQuery call to the page:

JAVASCRIPT:
-------------
$(document).ready(function() {
    $("[data-link]").click(function() {
        window.location.href = $(this).attr("data-link");
        return false;
    });
});

With this code jQuery applys a click listener to every tag on the page which has a "data-link" attribute and redirects to the URL which is in the data-link attribute.

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To get info about data-attributes see: ejohn.org/blog/html-5-data-attributes –  Mr Q.C. Sep 26 '13 at 14:14
    
This is a perfect solution! –  Cris Apr 30 at 22:25

This example worked for me:

<div style="position: relative; width:191px; height:83px;">
    <a href="link.php" style="display:block; width:100%; height:100%;"></a>
</div>
share|improve this answer

Just have the link in the block and enhance it with jquery. It degrades 100% gracefully for anyone without javascript. Doing this with html isn't really the best solution imho. For example:

<div id="div_link">
<h2><a href="mylink.htm">The Link and Headline</a></h2>
<p>Some more stuff and maybe another <a href="mylink.htm">link</a>.</p>
</div>

Then use jquery to make the block clickable (via web designer wall):

$(document).ready(function(){

    $("#div_link").click(function(){
      window.location=$(this).find("a").attr("href"); return false;
    });

});

Then all you have to do is add cursor styles to the div

    #div_link:hover {cursor: pointer;}

For bonus points only apply these styles if javascript is enabled by adding a 'js_enabled' class to the div, or the body, or whatever.

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i want to use this but i have 2 links in the div... how can i modify it to be able click on both links? (it currently takes me to "mylink.html" if i click the second link as well..) –  m3tsys Jul 26 '11 at 11:15

Alternaltively we can use this option (doesn't need an empty.gif as in the most upvoted answer):

HTML:

 <div class="feature">
       <a href="http://www.example.com"></a>
 </div>

CSS:

 div.feature {
        position: relative;
    }

    div.feature a {
        position: absolute;
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
        text-decoration: none; /* No underlines on the link */
        z-index: 10; /* Places the link above everything else in the div */
        background-color: #FFF; /* Fix to make div clickable in IE */
        opacity: 0; /* Fix to make div clickable in IE */
        filter: alpha(opacity=1); /* Fix to make div clickable in IE */
    }

As proposed here

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While I don't recommend doing this under any circumstance, here is some code that makes a DIV into a link (note: this example uses jQuery and certain markup is removed for simplicity):

<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery-1.3.2.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("div[href]").click(function () {
    	window.location = $(this).attr("href");
    });
});

</script>
<div href="http://www.google.com">
     My Div Link
</div>

Once again, I wouldn't do this so please don't vote me down. I am simply just trying to answer the question.

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3  
Again, this is a functional solution, but not really in the spirit of the original question which was for an XHTML solution. While not a huge deal, your answer does start to add noise to the question. –  Soviut May 8 '09 at 1:10

This work for me:

<div onclick="location.href='page.html';"  style="cursor:pointer;">...</div>
share|improve this answer

You can give a link to your div by following method:

<div class="boxdiv" onClick="window.location.href='https://www.google.co.in/'">google</div>
<style type="text/css">
.boxdiv {
    cursor:pointer;
    width:200px;
    height:200px;
    background-color:#FF0000;
    color:#fff;
    text-align:center;
    font:13px/17px Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    }
</style>
share|improve this answer

You can make surround the element with a href tags or you can use jquery and use

$('').click(function(e){
e.preventDefault();
//DO SOMETHING
});
share|improve this answer

This is the simplest way.

Say, this is the div block I want to make clickable:

<div class="inner_headL"></div>

So put a href as follows:

<a href="#">
 <div class="inner_headL"></div>
</a>

Just consider the div block as a normal html element and enable the usual a href tag.
It works on FF at least.

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Actually you need to include the JavaScript code at the moment, check this tutorial to do so.

but there is a tricky way to achieve this using a CSS code you must nest an anchor tag inside your div tag and you must apply this property to it,

display:block;

when you've done that,it will make the whole width area clickable (but within the height of the anchor tag),if you want to cover the whole div area you must set the height of the anchor tag exactly to the height of the div tag,for example:

height:60px;

this is gonna make the whole area clickable,then you can apply text-indent:-9999px to anchor tag to achieve the goal.

this is really tricky and simple and it's just created using CSS code.

here is an example: http://jsfiddle.net/hbirjand/RG8wW/

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I pulled in a variable because some values in my link will change depending on what record the user is coming from. This worked for testing :

   <div onclick="location.href='page.html';"  style="cursor:pointer;">...</div> 

and this works too :

   <div onclick="location.href='<%=Webpage%>';"  style="cursor:pointer;">...</div> 
share|improve this answer
1  
code doesn't show for some reason I used the onclick with a jsp variable inside to create a dynamic link –  becky Apr 19 '12 at 15:13

if just everything could be this simple...

#logo {background:url(../global_images/csg-4b15a4b83d966.png) no-repeat top left;background-position:0 -825px;float:left;height:48px;position:relative;width:112px}

#logo a {padding-top:48px; display:block;}



<div id="logo"><a href="../../index.html"></a></div>

just think a little outside the box ;-)

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My smarty pants answer:

"Evasive answer to: "How to make block level element a hyperlink and validate in XHTML 1.1"

Just use HTML5 DOCTYPE DTD."

Didn't actually hold true for ie7

onclick="location.href='page.html';"

Works IE7-9, Chrome, Safari, Firefox,

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he was looking for "I am looking for an XHTML 1.1 valid way" –  Mark Oct 20 '12 at 23:30

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