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I'm trying to make a class Bar that extends a class Foo. The code of Foo is beyond my control.

When someone makes a new instance of Bar (by writing something like Bar x = new Bar();) I want this to trigger a call to the Foo constructor that takes an input argument.

Basically:

class Foo {
    public Foo(string message) { print("The new Foo says: " + message); }
}

class Bar : Foo {
    public Bar() : base(this.GetType()) { }
}

So when someone uses new Bar(), it should print out The new Foo says: Bar. (Assuming there's a print function, which isn't the point here.)

Instead, C# complains because I'm trying to compute a result in the arguments to the base constructor.

Remember, Foo is beyond my reach, so I can't change any code in Foo.

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1  
Post the exact error message. This code seems correct. –  Henk Holterman Oct 31 '11 at 23:27
1  
What is the exact ctor for Foo? Foo(char[]) maybe? –  Henk Holterman Oct 31 '11 at 23:28
1  
@HenkHolterman, you're right, I just edited the question as I realized it was actually a slightly different problem. –  Joe Oct 31 '11 at 23:30
2  
@Joe it's not slightly different, actually. –  Etienne de Martel Oct 31 '11 at 23:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't use this before the actual constructor of a class, as only the parameters and static members (as the static constructor is run before any non-static ones) are accessable in that context. The runtime first needs to construct any classes you inherit from before you are able to access this.

As a workaround, you can use the typeof operator:

class Bar : Foo {
    public Bar() : base(typeof(Bar).ToString()) { }
}

Of course, this isn't portable, but is probably the best thing you'll be able to come up with.

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Seems to be corrected. –  Henk Holterman Oct 31 '11 at 23:28
    
he edited it in the question. –  Femaref Oct 31 '11 at 23:29
    
Sorry for the confusion, this is my first question on here. –  Joe Oct 31 '11 at 23:33
    
I edited my answer to reflect the changes. –  Femaref Oct 31 '11 at 23:34
2  
The constructor args/params aren't the only things accessible. Static members, for one, can also be used. But that's a pretty good workaround, assuming there won't be anything deriving from Bar later on or something. –  BoltClock Oct 31 '11 at 23:36

this.GetType() will not work to as an initialization routine.

You can't execute code that is passed to the base class but relies on the current instance. This is logical, as the base class constructor is executed first.

However, if you're passing a type, you can use typeof instead of GetType().

The following code runs and compiles correctly:

namespace TestNamespace
{
    using System;

    public class Test
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            var foo = new Bar();
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    class Foo
    {
        public Foo(Type type) { Console.WriteLine("The type of Foo is: " + type.ToString()); }
    }

    class Bar : Foo
    {
        public Bar() : base(typeof(Bar)) { }
    }
}

Upon execution, this prints to the console:

The type of Foo is: TestNamespace.Bar

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