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I'm not sure I quite understand the extent to which undefined behavior can jeopardize a program.

Let's say I have this code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int v = 0;
    scanf("%d", &v);
    if (v != 0)
    {
        int *p;
        *p = v;  // Oops
    }
    return v;
}

Is the behavior of this program undefined for only those cases in which v is nonzero, or is it undefined even if v is zero?

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4  
@JimRhodes: because if v is zero the offending piece of code is not executed. –  Matteo Italia Oct 31 '11 at 23:54
4  
@JimRhodes: the matter here is not if the code is good or bad, it is if, as for the standard, it exhibits undefined behavior regardless of the value inserted by the user. –  Matteo Italia Nov 1 '11 at 0:01
4  
Why the close votes? –  Matteo Italia Nov 1 '11 at 0:10
8  
@Mat: as with all "language-lawyer" questions the point is about standard nitpickery, not usefulness. Also, int a, b, c; scanf("%d", "%d", &a, &b); c=a+b;. Is this code valid? You'd say so, but in particular circumstances (where a+b overflows) this exhibits undefined behavior. Does this mean that the program, in its whole is invalid, in any circumstance? –  Matteo Italia Nov 1 '11 at 1:33
2  
The behavior of the program is undefined only when the statement invoking undefined behavior is executed. Yes, it is bad programming practice to have reachable code paths which invoke UB, but no UB is invoked as long as zero or non-numeric data is read from stdin. Keep in mind many real-world programs have similar cases of conditional invocation of UB due to failure to check the return value of malloc, or similar issues (UB is invoked when the pointer is dereferenced only if malloc returned 0). –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 5:02

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd say that the behavior is undefined only if the users inserts any number different from 0. After all, if the offending code section is not actually run the conditions for UB aren't met (i.e. the non-initialized pointer is not created neither dereferenced).

A hint of this can be found into the standard, at 3.4.3:

behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct or of erroneous data, for which this International Standard imposes no requirements

This seems to imply that, if such "erroneous data" was instead correct, the behavior would be perfectly defined - which seems pretty much applicable to our case.


Additional example: integer overflow. Any program that does an addition with user-provided data without doing extensive check on it is subject to this kind of undefined behavior - but an addition is UB only when the user provides such particular data.

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The pointer may still be allocated, depending on the compiler. However, this isnt a problem as, yes, it wont be dereferenced. –  chacham15 Nov 1 '11 at 0:06
1  
Is it just me, or does it seem contradicting to say its UB only if the user enters 0. If the user entered 0, the "offending code" wouldn't be ran, and the "conditions for UB aren't met" –  Shredder Nov 1 '11 at 0:15
    
@Shredder: sorry, fixed. –  Matteo Italia Nov 1 '11 at 0:16
    
@MatteoItalia Ah, ok. You had me scratchin' my brain :p –  Shredder Nov 1 '11 at 0:19
1  
I got confused for a sec about your example but I see what you mean now, thanks. +1 –  Mehrdad Nov 1 '11 at 1:25

Let me give an argument for why I think this is still undefined.

First, the responders saying this is "mostly defined" or somesuch, based on their experience with some compilers, are just wrong. A small modification of your example will serve to illustrate:

#include <stdio.h>

int
main()
{
    int v;
    scanf("%d", &v);
    if (v != 0)
    {
        printf("Hello\n");
        int *p;
        *p = v;  // Oops
    }
    return v;
}

What does this program do if you provide "1" as input? If you answer is "It prints Hello and then crashes", you are wrong. "Undefined behavior" does not mean the behavior of some specific statement is undefined; it means the behavior of the entire program is undefined. The compiler is allowed to assume that you do not engage in undefined behavior, so in this case, it may assume that v is non-zero and simply not emit any of the bracketed code at all, including the printf.

If you think this is unlikely, think again. GCC may not perform this analysis exactly, but it does perform very similar ones. My favorite example that actually illustrates the point for real:

int test(int x) { return x+1 > x; }

Try writing a little test program to print out INT_MAX, INT_MAX+1, and test(INT_MAX). (Be sure to enable optimization.) A typical implementation might show INT_MAX to be 2147483647, INT_MAX+1 to be -2147483648, and test(INT_MAX) to be 1.

In fact, GCC compiles this function to return a constant 1. Why? Because integer overflow is undefined behavior, therefore the compiler may assume you are not doing that, therefore x cannot equal INT_MAX, therefore x+1 is greater than x, therefore this function can return 1 unconditionally.

Undefined behavior can and does result in variables that are not equal to themselves, negative numbers that compare greater than positive numbers (see above example), and other bizarre behavior. The smarter the compiler, the more bizarre the behavior.

OK, I admit I cannot quote chapter and verse of the standard to answer the exact question you asked. But people who say "Yeah yeah, but in real life dereferencing NULL just gives a seg fault" are more wrong than they can possibly imagine, and they get more wrong with every compiler generation.

And in real life, if the code is dead you should remove it; if it is not dead, you must not invoke undefined behavior. So that is my answer to your question.

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1  
I don't see how your example supports the point you are trying to make. Your example executes unconditionally. My code executes conditionally. How are the two related? –  Mehrdad Nov 1 '11 at 0:44
    
My printf example is more to the point. The undefined construct can affect the behavior of the program before it even executes. (In this case, it can effectively prevent the printf from executing at all.) I do not think it is too much of a stretch from "before it even executes" to "even if it does not execute". Although I do not think anybody has answered your question conclusively with reference to the spec so far. –  Nemo Nov 1 '11 at 4:34
3  
@Nemo: It is a stretch. Nearly every program ever written in C (for example, every one using pointers) has unreachable code paths that invoke UB. But the program's behavior is well-defined as long as those paths are never taken. The only thing confusing the issue in this question is that whether the path is taken depends on input. This makes the program insecure, but the UB is still conditional on receiving a "bad" input. –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 5:09
    
@R: Yeah, that's a compelling point. –  Nemo Nov 1 '11 at 13:56
    
@Nemo: A compiler can produce code to do anything it wants as soon as a program has received a combination of inputs which will, unavoidably, cause undefined behavior. As far as the C standard is concerned, the code could even build a time machine and erase everyone's memory of the program having done anything sensible before such input was received. Nonetheless, if there exists any combination of input values which will yield defined behavior, the compiler's generated code must produce well-defined behavior if those input values are in fact supplied. –  supercat Nov 4 '11 at 21:06

Since this has the tag, I have an extremely nitpicking argument that the program's behavior is undefined regardless of user input, but not for the reasons you might expect -- though it can be well-defined (when v==0) depending on the implementation.

The program defines main as

int main()
{
    /* ... */
}

C99 5.1.2.2.1 says that the main function shall be defined either as

int main(void) { /* ... */ }

or as

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { /* ... */ }

or equivalent; or in some other implementation-defined manner.

int main() is not equivalent to int main(void). The former, as a declaration, says that main takes a fixed but unspecified number and type of arguments; the latter says it takes no arguments. The difference is that a recursive call to main such as

main(42);

is a constraint violation if you use int main(void), but not if you use int main().

For example, these two programs:

int main() {
    if (0) main(42); /* not a constraint violation */
}


int main(void) {
    if (0) main(42); /* constraint violation, requires a diagnostic */
}

are not equivalent.

If the implementation documents that it accepts int main() as an extension, then this doesn't apply for that implementation.

This is an extremely nitpicking point (about which not everyone agrees), and is easily avoided by declaring int main(void) (which you should do anyway; all functions should have prototypes, not old-style declarations/definitions).

In practice, every compiler I've seen accepts int main() without complaint.

To answer the question that was intended:

Once that change is made, the program's behavior is well defined if v==0, and is undefined if v!=0. Yes, the definedness of the program's behavior depends on user input. There's nothing particularly unusual about that.

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Whoa, I never knew that. So how is int main() different from int main(...)? –  Mehrdad Nov 1 '11 at 0:56
1  
@Mehrdad: int main(...) is a syntax error; a variadic function must have at least one named parameter. More generally, variadic functions (like printf) may legitimately be called with variable numbers and types of arguments. Functions with old-style non-prototype declarations must be called with the exact number and type(s) of arguments specified by the definition -- but the compiler won't diagnose calls with bad arguments. That's why prototypes were added to the language. –  Keith Thompson Nov 1 '11 at 1:14
    
Huh, interesting; +1 from me. –  Mehrdad Nov 1 '11 at 1:21
    
int main() is equivalent to int main(void) except that the former does not provide a prototype. Both declare a function taking no arguments, and int main() is perfectly valid by the "or equivalent". –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 4:59
1  
@R..: "... except that the former does not provide a prototype". Then they're not equivalent. See the examples I just added to my answer. Why do you assume that the phrase "or equivalent" permits this difference? –  Keith Thompson Nov 1 '11 at 7:59

If v is 0, your random pointer assignment never gets executed, and the function will return zero, so it is not undefined behaviour

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When you declare variables (especially explicit pointers), a piece of memory is allocated (usually an int). This peace of memory is being marked as free to the system but the old value stored there is not cleared (this depends on the memory allocation being implemented by the compiler, it might fill the place with zeroes) so your int *p will have a random value (junk) which it has to interpret as integer. The result is the place in memory where p points to (p's pointee). When you try to dereference (aka. access this piece of the memory), it will be (almost every time) occupied by another process/program, so trying to alter/modify some others memory will result in access violation issues by the memory manager.

So in this example, any other value then 0 will result in undefined behavior, because no one knows what *p will point to at this moment.

I hope this explanation is of any help.

Edit: Ah, sorry, again few answers ahead of me :)

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It's not the matter of how actually the compiler implements pointers & co., here we are discussing about the "abstract machine" of the standard. By the way, on any modern OS with memory isolation between processes the "random address" won't be "occupied by another process", because each process has its own virtual address space, and pointers can refer only to this. –  Matteo Italia Nov 1 '11 at 0:13
    
Thanks, it seems I didn't get the question right :) –  ludesign Nov 1 '11 at 0:14
    
What do you mean by "(usually an int)"? –  Keith Thompson Nov 1 '11 at 0:38
    
Sorry, I wanted to say "all variables are actually pointers, all pointers are actually an integer variables holding the address of their pointee"; However, I should stop browsing stackoverflow late at night, trying to express myself in a way I am not able to. :) –  ludesign Nov 1 '11 at 12:07

It is simple. If a piece of code doesn't execute, it doesn't have a behavior!!!, whether defined or not.

If input is 0, then the code inside if doesn't run, so it depends on the rest of the program to determine whether the behavior is defined (in this case it is defined).

If input is not 0, you execute code that we all know is a case of undefined behavior.

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2  
I'm not sure that's necessarily true. What about "if (input==9) {int foo[1000000000]; foo[0]=1;}" That could cause undefined behavior regardless of the value of 'input'. –  supercat Nov 4 '11 at 21:02

I would say it makes the whole program undefined.

The key to undefined behavior is that it is undefined. The compiler can do whatever it wants to when it sees that statement. Now, every compiler will handle it as expected, but they still have every right to do whatever they want to - including changing parts unrelated to it.

For example, a compiler may choose to add a message "this program may be dangerous" to the program if it detects undefined behavior. This would change the output whether or not v is 0.

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2  
"whole program undefined" That doesn't mean anything. A program execution can have undefined behaviour. It only means that the behaviour of this program execution is not defined by the standard. "including changing parts unrelated to it." Pure nonsense. –  curiousguy Nov 1 '11 at 2:01

Your program is pretty-well defined. If v == 0 then it returns zero. If v != 0 then it splatters over some random point in memory.

p is a pointer, its initial value could be anything, since you don't initialise it. The actual value depends on the operating system (some zero memory before giving it to your process, some don't), your compiler, your hardware and what was in memory before you ran your program.

The pointer assignment is just writing into a random memory location. It might succeed, it might corrupt other data or it might segfault - it depends on all of the above factors.

As far as C goes, it's pretty well defined that unintialised variables do not have a known value, and your program (though it might compile) will not be correct.

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"unintialised variables do not have a known value" The uninitialised variable does not have a value at all. –  curiousguy Nov 1 '11 at 2:02
    
Therein, you are wrong. In C, all variables have value. Uninitialized ones have "random" (or unknown) values. Consider this fragment: "int i; printf("%d\n", i);". Compile it with warnings disabled and see what it prints! –  Adam Hawes Nov 14 '11 at 2:25
1  
No, you are wrong. In C and C++, variables that have not been written to cannot be read. The behaviour of a read of an uninitialised variable is not defined. "In C, all variables have value." What is the value of an uninitialised variable? An uninitialised variable does not have a value. You cannot say that its value is either zero or non-zero because it has no value. –  curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 4:32

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