Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working with a simple command line application that takes in ASCI text and interprets it as a command.

I have attempted to minimize the redundancy in this application via the example at http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Concatenation.html.

eg: Consider a C program that interprets named commands. There probably needs to be a table of commands, perhaps an array of structures declared as follows:

 struct command
 {
   char *name;
   void (*function) (void);
 };

 struct command commands[] =
 {
   { "quit", quit_command },
   { "help", help_command },
   ...
 };

It would be cleaner not to have to give each command name twice, once in the string constant and once in the function name. A macro which takes the name of a command as an argument can make this unnecessary. The string constant can be created with stringification, and the function name by concatenating the argument with `_command'. Here is how it is done:

 #define COMMAND(NAME)  { #NAME, NAME ## _command }

 struct command commands[] =
 {
   COMMAND (quit),
   COMMAND (help),
   ...
 };

Now, let's say that I want to have a command string and index (ie: int) value, rather than a string and function pointer.

 struct command
 {
   char *name;
   int command_idx;
 };

Now, I have a means to name commands, and have some sort of index I can use later on to identify each command programatically. For example, I have a switch statement that operates on the command index. If I want to work on these indexes, I have to manually set the values first.

I can manually create an enumerated data type, but then I have define the enumerated constants in a separate enum statement. IE: enum commands { cmd_quit = 0, cmd_help } and in the end, I still end up having to type each command name twice: once via the COMMAND() macro, and again in my enum.

Is there any method using the C preprocessor that would allow me to create a macro creates the "command" struct (with string and int members), and auto-numbers the int value (command_idx) as I add more commands via the COMMAND() macro?

I am also aware that I can just use strcmp() calls on each possible command, and compare to the input provided by the user, but I would like to have a direct means of indexing into commands via the command_idx value, as opposed to strcmp'ing against a massive list of commands each time (ie: O(1) instead of O(n) ). I also want to avoid having to type the command name more than once at all costs.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Why you would want an index? You are better off with a function pointer... –  K-ballo Nov 1 '11 at 0:23
    
Some compilers have a __COUNTER__ macro. You could use that. –  Pubby Nov 1 '11 at 0:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use macro redefinition to achieve this. First, you create a file that simply lists your commands called commands.inc:

COMMAND(quit)
COMMAND(help)
...

Then, in your C source you can #include "commands.inc" multiple times, with different definitions of COMMAND() in effect to control how it works. For example:

struct command
{
   char *name;
   int command_idx;
};

#define COMMAND(NAME) CMD_ ## NAME,

enum command_enum {
#include "commands.inc"
};

#undef COMMAND

#define COMMAND(NAME) { #NAME, CMD_ ## NAME },

struct command commands[] =
{
#include "commands.inc"
};

#undef COMMAND

(Note that this particular example relies on a C99 improvement that allows a trailing , at the end of the lists in the enum declaration and compound initialiser - you can easily work around that in C89 by adding a dummy entry at the end).

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. This is exactly what I wanted. –  Dogbert Nov 1 '11 at 18:20
    
Sorry for not accepting earlier. New to StackOverflow. I assumed modding the question up counted as accepting. :) –  Dogbert Feb 9 '12 at 17:16

Question:

Is there any method using the C preprocessor that would allow me to create a macro creates the "command" struct (with string and int members), and auto-numbers the int value (command_idx) as I add more commands via the COMMAND() macro?

Yes, and since you have tagged the question also as C++:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

map< string, int >     commands;

bool register_cmd( int id, string const& name )
{
    commands[name] = id;
    return true;
}

#define COMMAND( name ) \
    int const name ## _cmd = __LINE__; \
    bool const name ## _reg = register_cmd( name ## _cmd, #name )

COMMAND( exit );
COMMAND( help );
COMMAND( do_stuff );

int cmd_id( string const& name )
{
    auto const it = commands.find( name );
    return (it == commands.end()? -1 : it->second );
}

int main()
{
    for( auto it = commands.begin();  it != commands.end();  ++it )
    {
        cout << it->first << " => " << it->second << endl;
    }

    cout << "Gimme a command, please: ";
    string cmd;  getline( cin, cmd );
    switch( cmd_id( cmd ) )
    {
    case exit_cmd:
        cout << "You typed an EXIT command, which has id " << exit_cmd << endl;
        break;
    default:
        cout << "Hey, why not try an 'exit' command?" << endl;
    }
}

I just used map instead of fancy new C++11 hash table because map works with older compilers and no real need for shaving nano-seconds here.

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I now have both a C99 and C++ means of achieving this. Thank you all for your assistance! –  Dogbert Nov 1 '11 at 18:21
    
You could probably eliminate the bool variables by having register_cmd() return id, then using int const name ## _cmd = register_cmd(__LINE__, #name) –  caf Nov 1 '11 at 21:06
    
@caf: right, thanks. i didn't strive for perfection. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 1 '11 at 22:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.