Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm writing a program that uses File I/O to traverse through a directory given by the user and then adds the directories to a generic linked list. The program I wrote works perfectly on Ubuntu, but does not work when I try to use it on Windows. Its a pretty long program but this is the part that I think is having issues:

private Node<Item> currentNode = new Node<Item>();

public void traverse(File fileObject)
{
    File allFiles[] = fileObject.listFiles();

    for(File aFile: allFiles){
        System.out.println(aFile.getName()); /* debugging */
        recursiveTraversal(aFile); /* Line 34 */
    }
}


public void recursiveTraversal(File fileObject){
    Node<Item> newNode = new Node<Item>();
    currentNode.addChild(newNode);
    currentNode = newNode;
    if (fileObject.isDirectory()){
        newNode.setData(new Item());

        File allFiles[] = fileObject.listFiles();
        for(File aFile : allFiles){ /* This is line 48 */
            recursiveTraversal(aFile);
        }            

    }else if (fileObject.isFile()){
        newNode.setData(new Item());
    }           
    currentNode = newNode.getParent();
}

When I use it on Linux I can give it something like /home/matt/Documents and it works, but when I try on windows using G:\\Users\\Matt\\Documents it errors out. The print statement I threw in actually prints out files in the folder, but something with the rest of the program messes up:

java.lang.NullPointerException
at FileTraverse.recursiveTraversal(FileTraverse.java:48)
at FileTraverse.traverse(FileTraverse.java:34)
at DirectoryMain$ClickAction.actionPerformed(DirectoryMain.java:103)
    ...

Theres a lot of errors afterwards that have to do with the Swing GUI this program is running off of but I don't think that has to do with anything.

EDIT: Added in line numbers that correspond with the trace.

share|improve this question
    
Where does currentNode object get created before you do - currentNode.addChild(newNode);? –  CoolBeans Nov 1 '11 at 0:31
    
Somewhere up at the top of my class as a global variable. –  Matt Nov 1 '11 at 0:33
    
Can you add that snippet on how you are defining currentNode? What does line 48 in FileTraverse.java have? –  CoolBeans Nov 1 '11 at 0:34
    
I have added in the currentNode line as well as added comments next to the lines the errors refer to. –  Matt Nov 1 '11 at 0:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

my guess is that you are hitting a directory which for some reason windows will not allow you to view. listFiles() is most likely returning null in this instance.

share|improve this answer
    
This does seem possible as the program seems to be working for other certain directories.. –  Matt Nov 1 '11 at 0:58
    
Would also explain why it's only an issue on Windows. Maybe try running the app again with elevated rights. I.e. "run as administrator". –  G_H Nov 1 '11 at 1:14

From the Javadoc of File.listFile() (emphasis added):

Returns: An array of abstract pathnames denoting the files and directories in the directory denoted by this abstract pathname. The array will be empty if the directory is empty. Returns null if this abstract pathname does not denote a directory, or if an I/O error occurs.

You'll need to cope with null returns from listFiles(), unfortunately with the java.io.File API there is no way to find out exactly what error occurred.

If you are using Java 7, you can use the DirectoryStream class instead:

private void recursiveTraversal(Path path)
throws IOException
{
    try (DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream(path)) 
    {
        for (Path entry : stream) 
        {
            //Do something with entry
            doSomething(entry);

            if (Files.isDirectory(entry))
                recursiveTraversal(entry);
        }
    }
}

The difference being that newDirectoryStream() can throw an IOException (or a subclass such as AccessDeniedException that gives information about why the call failed.

share|improve this answer

If you get a NullPointerException on line 48, it must mean the allFiles array you've obtained is null. According to the JavaDoc for that method, this should only occur if the File you're calling it on is not a directory or some IO error occurs. It is a bit odd since you do check if it's a directory in the if. Maybe there's some access issue on OS level, regarding permissions.

You might want to look into using FileFilters or maybe stuff from the java.nio.file package. I believe the latter makes traversing directories easier.

share|improve this answer

The difference between traverse() and recursiveTraversal() is a little strange to me; when would you use traverse()? What role does it play that recursiveTraversal() doesn't already do? Sure, traverse() assumes it is working with a directory, but recursiveTraversal() already handles directories well.

There's all the fiddling about with Items in recursiveTraversal(), but since they don't do anything here, it's hard to spot the utility. :)

public void traverse(File fileObject)
{
    File allFiles[] = fileObject.listFiles();

    for(File aFile: allFiles){
        System.out.println(aFile.getName()); /* debugging */
        recursiveTraversal(aFile);
    }
}


public void recursiveTraversal(File fileObject){
    Node<Item> newNode = new Node<Item>();
    currentNode.addChild(newNode);
    currentNode = newNode;
    if (fileObject.isDirectory()){
        newNode.setData(new Item());

        File allFiles[] = fileObject.listFiles();
        for(File aFile : allFiles){
            recursiveTraversal(aFile);
        }            

    }else if (fileObject.isFile()){
        newNode.setData(new Item());
    }           
    currentNode = newNode.getParent();
}

I would probably move the newNode.setData(new Item()); above the isDirectory() check to make it clear that newNode has a new Item added to it no matter if the current fileObject is a file or directory:

public void recursiveTraversal(File fileObject){
    Node<Item> newNode = new Node<Item>();
    currentNode.addChild(newNode);
    currentNode = newNode;
    newNode.setData(new Item());
    if (fileObject.isDirectory()){
        File allFiles[] = fileObject.listFiles();
        for(File aFile : allFiles){
            recursiveTraversal(aFile);
        }            
    }else if (fileObject.isFile()){
        /* must do _something_ with files */
    }           
    currentNode = newNode.getParent();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is true. Thanks for the advice. Sorry for my messy code. I have just started learning data structures and I will try to get the unnecessary stuff out as soon as I can. –  Matt Nov 1 '11 at 0:58

I was trying something similar on Windows and the program would crash and return a nullPointerException as soon the program tried traversing a directory where the security permissions had restricted access.

Unless you need the program to add secure/hidden/system folders, simply handle the error using a try catch clause.

public static void dive(File file, int level){    
    try{
        for(File x : file.listFiles())
            if(x.isDirectory() && !x.isHidden())
                dive(x);
     }catch(NullPointerException e){
        // Do nothing..
     }
 }

This should traverse all user directories

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.