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So I have made this simple interface:

package{
    public interface GraphADT{
        function addNode(newNode:Node):Boolean;     
    }
}

I have also created a simple class Graph:

package{

    public class Graph implements GraphADT{

        protected var nodes:LinkedList;

        public function Graph(){
            nodes = new LinkedList();
        }

        public function addNode (newNode:Node):Boolean{
            return nodes.add(newNode);
        }
}

last but not least I have created another simple class AdjacancyListGraph:

package{
    public class AdjacancyListGraph extends Graph{

        public function AdjacancyListGraph(){
            super();
        }

        override public function addNode(newNode:AwareNode):Boolean{
            return nodes.add(newNode);
        }
}

Having this setup here is giving me errors, namely:

1144: Interface method addNode in namespace GraphADT is implemented with an incompatible signature in class AdjacancyListGraph.

Upon closer inspection it was apparent that AS3 doesn't like the different parameter types from the different Graph classes newNode:Node from Graph , and newNode:AwareNode from AdjacancyListGraph

However I don't understand why that would be a problem since AwareNode is a subClass of Node.

Is there any way I can make my code work, while keeping the integrity of the code?

share|improve this question
    
You are overriding the addNode function to accept AwareNode which should be OK for extending the class but now the interface(s) need to follow that extension of the base class node also. At least that's how it looks to me. I avoid interfaces like the plague. –  The_asMan Nov 1 '11 at 0:56
2  
@The_asMan, that makes me sad. Interfaces are great things for decoupling, as long as you understand what it is. Its a contract that no matter what else your object does, it does these things. –  32bitkid Nov 1 '11 at 1:00
    
+1 for getting what interfaces are for, @32bitkid. The only way to achieve a reusable and maintainable architecture. And an absolute necessessity for unit testing. –  weltraumpirat Nov 1 '11 at 1:07
    
I agree @The_asMan –  vvMINOvv Nov 1 '11 at 1:14
    
@weltraumpirat you don't need interfaces to achieve quality re-usability. This is OOP there is always another way to achieve the same. But then again its developers design choice. –  The_asMan Nov 1 '11 at 1:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simple answer:

If you don't really, really need your 'addNode()' function to accept only an AwareNode, you can just change the parameter type to Node. Since AwareNode extends Node, you can pass in an AwareNode without problems. You could check for type correctness within the function body :

subclass... {
    override public function addNode (node:Node ) : Boolean {
        if (node is AwareNode) return nodes.add(node);
        return false;
    }
}

Longer answer:

I agree with @32bitkid that your are getting an error, because the parameter type defined for addNode() in your interface differs from the type in your subclass.

However, the main problem at hand is that ActionScript generally does not allow function overloading (having more than one method of the same name, but with different parameters or return values), because each function is treated like a generic class member - the same way a variable is. You might call a function like this:

myClass.addNode (node);

but you might also call it like this:

myClass["addNode"](node);

Each member is stored by name - and you can always use that name to access it. Unfortunately, this means that you are only allowed to use each function name once within a class, regardless of how many parameters of which type it takes - nothing comes without a price: You gain flexibility in one regard, you lose some comfort in another.

Hence, you are only allowed to override methods with the exact same signature - it's a way to make you stick to what you decided upon when you wrote the base class. While you could obviously argue that this is a bad idea, and that it makes more sense to use overloading or allow different signatures in subclasses, there are some advantages to the way that AS handles functions, which will eventually help you solve your problem: You can use a type-checking function, or even pass one on as a parameter!

Consider this:

class... {

    protected function check (node:Node) : Boolean {
        return node is Node;
    }    

    public function addNode (node:Node) : Boolean {
        if (check(node)) return nodes.add(node);
        return false;
    }
}

In this example, you could override check (node:Node):

subclass... {
    override protected function check (node:Node) : Boolean {
        return node is AwareNode;
    } 
}

and achieve the exact same effect you desired, without breaking the interface contract - except, in your example, the compiler would throw an error if you passed in the wrong type, while in this one, the mistake would only be visible at runtime (a false return value).

You can also make this even more dynamic:

class... {
    public function addNode (node:Node, check : Function ) : Boolean {
        if (check(node)) return nodes.add(node);
        return false;
    }
}

Note that this addNode function accepts a Function as a parameter, and that we call that function instead of a class method:

var f:Function = function (node:Node) : Boolean {
    return node is AwareNode;
}

addNode (node, f);

This would allow you to become very flexible with your implementation - you can even do plausibility checks in the anonymous function, such as verifying the node's content. And you wouldn't even have to extend your class, unless you were going to add other functionality than just type correctness.

Having an interface will also allow you to create implementations that don't inherit from the original base class - you can write a whole different class hierarchy, it only has to implement the interface, and all your previous code will remain valid.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the annon function idea. But how hard is that to GC? –  The_asMan Nov 1 '11 at 2:06
    
It's not. You treat the function like a variable: If it needs reusing, make it a class member (private var f:Function(!)). It will then be GC'ed if set to null. If it doesn't, it will be discarded after use like any other temp variable. –  weltraumpirat Nov 1 '11 at 2:11

I guess the question is really this: What are you trying to accomplish?

As to why you are getting an error, consider this:

public class AnotherNode extends Node { }

and then:

var alGraph:AdjacancyListGraph = new AdjacancyListGraph();

alGraph.addNode(new AnotherNode());  
// Wont work. AnotherNode isn't compatable with the signature
// for addNode(node:AwareNode)

// but what about the contract? 

var igraphADT:GraphADT = GraphADT(alGraph);
igraphADT.addNode(new AnotherNode()); // WTF?

According to the interface this should be fine. But your implemenation says otherwise, your implemenation says that it will only accept a AwareNode. There is an obvious mismatch. If you are going to have an interface, a contract that your object should follow, then you might as well follow it. Otherwise, whats the point of the interface in the first place.

I submit that architecture messed up somewhere if you are trying to do this. Even if the language were to support it, I would say that its a "Bad Idea™"

share|improve this answer
    
That's not what I'm doing mind you. I'm simply trying to ask for an AwareNode as opposed to the general Node . Which to me should be fine because AwareNode would have all the required methods to be used as a Node (from the perspective of the interface). Am I right? –  vvMINOvv Nov 1 '11 at 1:17
    
@vvMINOvv but you could. thats the point. that's why the compiler is complaining. because it doesn't make sense. –  32bitkid Nov 1 '11 at 1:20
    
I guess what I'm saying is that, since AwareNode would have all the methods in Node, if I were to pass in an AwareNode into Graph it should have no trouble with it, because all the methods it's "used to" are there. That's my understanding of why interfaces are useful, please correct me if I'm wrong :D –  vvMINOvv Nov 1 '11 at 1:23
1  
@vvMINOvv Interfaces define a contract of behavior. Your interface says "Hey, I will add any kind Node you want." but your implementation says "Nope, I only accept an AwareNode". If you implement an interface, you object should be able to act exactly as the interface defines. –  32bitkid Nov 1 '11 at 1:26
    
thank's a tonne for putting it in lamens terms :D !! So I know you can extend an interface, but can you override an interface function? –  vvMINOvv Nov 1 '11 at 1:30

There's an easier way, then suggested above, but less safe:

public class Parent {
public function get foo():Function { return this._foo; }
protected var _foo:Function = function(node:Node):void { ... }}

public class Child extends Parent {
public function Child() {
super();
this._foo = function(node:AnotherNode):void { ... }}}

Of course _foo needs not be declared in place, the syntax used is for shortness and demonstration purposes only. You will loose the ability of the compiler to check types, but the runtime type matching will still apply.

Yet another way to go about it - don't declare methods in the classes they specialize on, rather make them static, then you will not inherit them automatically:

public class Parent {
public static function foo(parent:Parent, node:Node):Function { ... }}

public class Child extends Parent {
public static function foo(parent:Child, node:Node):Function { ... }}

Note that in second case protected fields are accessible inside the static method, so you can achieve certain encapsulation. Besides, if you have a lot of Parent or Child instances, you will save on individual instance memory footprint (as static methods therefore static there exists only one copy of them, but instance methods would be copied for each instance). The disadvantage is that you won't be able to use interfaces (can be actually an improvement... depends on your personal preferences).

share|improve this answer
    
interesting idea –  vvMINOvv Nov 1 '11 at 21:57

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