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Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/stapiagutierrez/KKdsb/29/


I'm just trying to create my own star rating UI for websites and so far it works just how I want it to, but I'd like to see if I can trim down my code without sacrificing legibility.

Since I'm new to jQuery, maybe I'm doing things the roundabout way.

Any suggestions on where to improve?

ul {
    list-style-type:none;
    margin-top:10px;
    margin-left:10px;
    border:1px solid #333;
    border-radius:8px;
    overflow:hidden;
    width:111px;
    cursor:pointer;
}

li {
    float:left;
    margin-left:5px;
    padding-top:2px;
}

<ul>
    <li>
        <img class="onestar rating" src="http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png" alt="no-star" />
    </li>

    <li>
        <img class="twostar rating" src="http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png" alt="no-star" />
    </li>

    <li>
        <img class="threestar rating" src="http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png" alt="no-star" />
    </li>

    <li>
        <img class="fourstar rating" src="http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png" alt="no-star" />
    </li>

    <li>
        <img class="fivestar rating" src="http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png" alt="no-star" />
    </li>
</ul>

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".rating").click(function() {
        if ($(this).hasClass("onestar")) {
            alert("Clicked on 1 star!");
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("twostar")) {
            alert("Clicked on 2 stars!");
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("threestar")) {
            alert("Clicked on 3 stars!");
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("fourstar")) {
            alert("Clicked on 4 stars!");
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("fivestar")) {
            alert("Clicked on 5 stars!");
        }
    });

    $(".rating").mouseleave(function() {
        $(".rating").each(function() {
            $(this).attr("src", "http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png");
        });
    });

    $(".rating").mouseover(function() {
        if ($(this).hasClass("onestar")) {
            $(".onestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("twostar")) {
            $(".onestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".twostar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("threestar")) {
            $(".onestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".twostar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".threestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("fourstar")) {
            $(".onestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".twostar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".threestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".fourstar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
        }
        else if ($(this).hasClass("fivestar")) {
            $(".onestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".twostar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".threestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".fourstar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
            $(".fivestar").attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
        }
    });
});
share|improve this question
    
Please also include the jquery code here -- if jsfiddle goes down, this question can't mean much to anyone else. –  sarnold Nov 1 '11 at 1:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That was kinda fun, here's the jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/KKdsb/30/

NOTE: The usage of two parent() functions in the mouseover handler is subject to your html structure. I'd recommend a class or similar to access the parent <ul> element directly using $(this).closest('.classname').

jQuery code:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".rating").click(function() {
        var position = $(this).parent().index();
    });

    $(".rating").mouseleave(function() {
        $(".rating").each(function() {
            $(this).attr("src", "http://i.imgur.com/8LA1i.png");
        });
    });

    $(".rating").mouseover(function() {
        var position = $(this).parent().index() + 1;
        $(this).parent().parent().find("li:lt("+position+") > img").each(function (i, e) {
            $(e).attr('src', 'http://i.imgur.com/X68bI.png');
        });
    });
});

Reference:

share|improve this answer
1  
Hey Andre - I edited your answer to swap .parent() for .parents(), but I think .closest() is what you want. .closest() will stop when it hits its first match, where .parents() will continue up the DOM tree looking for further matches. –  Beejamin Nov 1 '11 at 3:03
    
Hi Beejamin, I've edited my answer to include closest(), thanks for the suggestion! –  Andre Nov 1 '11 at 13:38

This is a great candidate for using image sprites. Basically, you put all of your star ratings into a single image file, and move that file around with 'background-position' CSS. The main advantage of doing it this way is that you only ever make one request for the star image - you're not changing the path to the start image repeatedly (which can make things a bit janky and slow, depending on the browser.

Here's an example using image sprites: http://www.spookandpuff.com/examples/starRatings/starRatings.html

Here's the image sprite I used:

5 star image sprite

And here's the HTML, CSS and Javascript:

The HTML is very simple:

<div class="starRating">
    <ol class="ratingValues">
      <li>1</li>
      <li>2</li>
      <li>3</li>
      <li>4</li>
      <li>5</li>
    </ol>
  </div>

It's possible to go without the extra DIV, but that will cause problems on older browsers that don't support multiple-class CSS selectors, so I've left it in.

The CSS is also quite simple:

      .starRating {
        width:105px;
        height:20px;
        float:left;
        margin:20px 0;
      }

      .ratingValues {
        float:left;
        width:100%;
        list-style:none;
        background:url(starSprite.png) no-repeat 0 0;
      }

      .ratingValues li{
        display:block;
        float:left;
        width:21px;
        height:20px;
        text-indent:-999em;
        overflow:hidden;
        cursor:pointer;
      }

      .rating_1 .ratingValues {background-position:0 -20px}
      .rating_2 .ratingValues {background-position:0 -40px}
      .rating_3 .ratingValues {background-position:0 -60px}
      .rating_4 .ratingValues {background-position:0 -80px}
      .rating_5 .ratingValues {background-position:0 -100px}

Here, we set up the box to be the same size as one row of stars from the sprite. The list items become squares of the right size (one square per 'star' in the graphic). I've used negative-text-indent to hide the text inside each <li>.

Most interesting is the last block. Here, we're adjusting the background position of the sprite depending on the class of a containing element, so, when .ratingValues is inside something with the class of 'rating_3', the background will move to position: 0 -60px.

I bet you can see where this is headed. Here's the javascript:

$(function(){
  starRatings = $('.starRating'); //Cache this to make future references faster

  starRatings.each(function(){ //Iterate through each rating, in case there's more than one per page
    var thisRating = $(this),
        triggers = $('.ratingValues > li', this); //More caching

    triggers 
      .hover(
        function(){ //The hover-over event
          var trigger = this;
          thisRating.addClass(function(){
            return 'rating_' + (triggers.index(trigger) + 1); //This sets the class to rating_ + the number of the element (1 - 5)
          })
        },
        function(){  //The hover-out event, just clears the classes
          thisRating.removeClass('rating_1 rating_2 rating_3 rating_4 rating_5');
        })
        .click(function(){ //The click event
          alert('Clicked ' + (triggers.index(this) + 1));
        });
  });

});

This finds any element with the class of .starRating, and assigns event handlers to the <li>s within it. Hovering the <li>s assigns a class to the 'starRating' div, which basically tells us what value is selected (rating_1 to rating_5). The CSS kicks in at this point, and moves the background sprite to the right position.

For extra points, you can put a standard anchor, something like this: <a href="{rateThis?rating=1}">1</a> within each LI, which will fire the request to your server and set the rating over straight HTTP (no javascript). That way, everything still works if Javascript is off.

I hope that's clear enough - shout if you need more help!

share|improve this answer
1  
Looks to me like OP is asking for simplification of his code. You upped the complexity but ended up with just as much overall code. Is using images sprites a good idea? Yeah! But your solution seems hardly any better than the original one. –  Ilia G Nov 1 '11 at 3:18
2  
The OP has said he is new to jQuery, so I have provided an example with lots of explanation, and safeties in the form of caching to allow this solution to be robust and re-useable. It shows some useful techniques for beginners to DOM manipulation, jQuery event handling, and CSS/JS interactions. I stand by it. Reducing complexity is not just about how much code there is - it's about how understandable it is. –  Beejamin Nov 1 '11 at 4:36
    
Not exactly the answer to the question, but I think this is a great option. I actually really like the way the stars fill in the sprites, the JS looks a bit slow here. I would totally go for this one in future projects :) –  Yisela Nov 1 '11 at 11:43
    
Another more real problem is: How are you going to display partial scores? I.e. score of 4.5 amazon.com/Greatest-Hits-2/product-reviews/B005SO6HT6/… –  Ilia G Nov 1 '11 at 13:07
    
The sprite image can be extended to cover half or quarter points easily enough. It wouldn't be a good solution if you needed to show more precision than that though. –  Beejamin Nov 2 '11 at 1:26

Original answer: here

===========================================================

It seems my solution came under fire for.... well, I am not quiet sure. Ok, thats fine, lets complicate it just a little bit to satisfy purist police: here (sprite image cunningly stolen from Beejamin's answer).

Pros of this solution over others in this thread:

  1. Minimal amount of code, markup and CSS. Very easy to read and support.
  2. Solves the general design issue in the OP rather than trying to patch it with jQuery sugar.
  3. Supports floating point scores (simply set the width to value / maxWidth)
  4. Supports switching between clickable and read-only views by simply disabling click event (no need to modify HTML).
  5. Following 3 and 4 - it is a single control to display both individual user scores and composite score.
  6. Smaller image size than required for Beejamin's answer (it only uses first and last rows). Illustrates proper use of image sprites.
  7. No complex DOM manipulations or CSS lookups

Cons: None that I can see.

Cons fixed since last iteration:

  1. Removed js dependancy on image width. Now it is dynamically calculated, though I still think it is unnecessary.

Complete and fully functional version here. Fancy version with click animation here

share|improve this answer
    
Then how do you detect how many stars to show? Do you check the X position the mouse is in the element? That sounds more complicated with no reason. –  Only Bolivian Here Nov 1 '11 at 1:17
3  
Wouldn't this make for a better comment than an answer? –  Flimzy Nov 1 '11 at 1:17
    
@SergioTapia why is it complicated? –  Ilia G Nov 1 '11 at 1:21
    
@Flimzy he doesn't have a jQuery problem. He has a general design issue, which he is trying to solve using jQuery, which is pretty pointless exercise. –  Ilia G Nov 1 '11 at 1:22
    
Well you have to calculate the width of the each individual star and make sure it's centered. –  Only Bolivian Here Nov 1 '11 at 1:22

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