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    private boolean isValid(int aRating)
{                     

  return aRating >= 1 && aRating <= 10;

}

                or

    private boolean isValid(int aRating)
{                     

  if (aRating >=1 && aRating <=100
      return true;
  else
      return false

}

I now need to Write a method setRating(aRating) that sets the rating to aRating IF it is valid. So i am assuming that i need to use the method above in a public method to check if it is valid. If it is valid i then need to set rating = to aRating. So far my idea has been this:

    public void setRating(int aRating)
{
   if (isValid() == true)
       rating = aRating;

}

But i cannot use isValid as a == to true because it is a method. i also try using isValid(); in order to just try and use the method but it wont allow because of the (int aRating) at the top. If i do not have the identifier it then wont allow me to use aRating at all...

Now that it is

public void setRating(int aRating)
     {
       if (isValid(aRating))
          rating = aRating;
     }

I need to make a setRating() method that allows the user to input something from the keyboard and again it has to be valid, i keep getting an error because it says i cant overload SetRating(int aRating) Twice, which i understand. But if i try to take the int part out it is invalid because it needs a parameter. this is what i have

    public void setRating()
{
    Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
  if (isValid(aRating))
      rating = keyboard.nextInt();
}
share|improve this question
    
Generall it is a bad idea to provide a method setRating that reads interactively from the keyboard. The design of the user interface should happen in another part of the program and just use the setRating(int) method. That way you don't have to change the code in every class just because your teachers tells you to change the prompt to “Please input:”. –  Roland Illig Nov 1 '11 at 3:44
    
I must be learning wrong, or this book is really bad because it specifically asks to make Two setRating methods, One which i demonstrated above in which Corey helped me with. setRating(aRating) which is fine, and a second setRating() that needs to " Read a rating from the keyboard, insisting that the rating supplied by the user be valid" –  Renuz Nov 1 '11 at 3:49
    
There is a huge difference between a beginner's book and real life code. For a beginner's book it's good style to make the code as short and as readable as possible. It's ok because the code doesn't have to live in a large system where it's easy to lose the overview. But you will probably learn that later anyway. Your task now is to read from the keyboard and validate the input, and that in itself is very valuable. –  Roland Illig Nov 1 '11 at 3:57
    
Yeah hopefully in a few years i can get on to the bigger picture, for now though i cannot get my second setRating to work because it needs a parameter type, which is int, but it is not allowed because the prior setRating has type int. –  Renuz Nov 1 '11 at 4:03
    
Just one other thing: your source code editor probably has a feature called “automatic source code formatting”, which you should use from time to time. It makes it easier for everyone to read your code. –  Roland Illig Nov 1 '11 at 4:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public void setRating(int aRating)
{
   if (isValidRating(aRating))
       this.rating = aRating;
}

This might not be required for your homework, but in the real world you may also want to consider throwing an IllegalArgumentException if validation fails.

Example:

public void setRating(int aRating)
{
    if (isValidRating(aRating))
        this.rating = aRating;
    else 
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid rating.");
}
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I see, what does the "throw new" do, does that initialize the IllegalArgumentException, i looked that up and i think i know what that means now. –  Renuz Nov 1 '11 at 3:45
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You have to pass the aRating argument to the isValid method as well. And instead of just skipping the assignment for wrong values, it is often better to throw an exception, like this:

public void setRating(int rating) {
  checkRating(rating);
  this.rating = rating;
}

private void checkRating(int rating) {
  if (!(1 <= rating && rating <= 10)) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid rating: " + rating);
  }
}

This style of argument checking is used by popular classes like java.util.ArrayList, for example in the get(int) method.

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