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Is it wrong to have a lot of parameters inside a constructor? like 10 to 15 parameters? because I was designing a class where a constructor will have lots of parameter, for example, a Person class. A person class has the 6 numbers of parameters in it's constructor like

public class Person {
    private String fName;
    private String lName;
    private String mInitial;
    private int age;
    private String contactNumber;
    private String emailAddress;

    public Person(String fName, String lName,String mInitial,int age,String contactNumber,String emailAddress) {
       //insert rest of code here 
    }
}

is that wrong ? creating lots of parameters for a constructor? then I am planning to create a class named Employee then extending it to person class then it will have again long constructors. the thing that worries me about is the practice , is this good or what? any other suggestions? sorry for my bad english

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Shameless plug: See also stackoverflow.com/questions/2432443/… –  JRL Nov 1 '11 at 4:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. In general, if you find yourself have too many parameters, that means you don't have enough low-level classes. In your case, you could have a class Name { /* fname, lname, initial, */ } and perhaps a class Contact { /* email, phone */ }

  2. When you extend your class, have the constructor take the base as one parameter, and then add the new extra parameters. (You probably mean Employee will extend Person, rather than vice versa, so public Employee (Person person, Company company, String employeeId) { super(person); this.company = company; this.employeeId = employeeId; }

Good question!

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can you explain further? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 7:25
    
which part -- 1. or 2.? –  necromancer Nov 1 '11 at 7:38
    
both, is there any code that I can see for actual implementation with a main class on it? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 10:14
2  
i would be doing you a disservice by spoon feeding code "with a main class on it", since it seems like you are trying to learn programming. the most important step in learning is to think hard. for point 1. your constructor would change FROM the existing: public Person(String fName, String lName,String mInitial,int age,String contactNumber,String emailAddress) { /* ... */ } TO this: public Person(Name name, int age, ContactInfo contactInfo) { /* ... */ } and you would need class Name { private String fName; private String lName; /* etc. */ } and similarly class ContactInfo continued –  necromancer Nov 1 '11 at 22:15
1  
HOWEVER, in the programming community this is NOT a "has a" relationship; instead it is a "is a" relationship. That is, "Employee is a Person". When you call super(person); you are using the "is a" relationship and not "has a". BUT internally programming languages implement "is a" and "has a" in a similar way -- both are internally "has a" relationship. So your intuition is right, but your terminology is not. The language-level (non-internal) difference is that an "is a" relationship lets you assign a derived object to a base reference, and use polymorphism when you call methods later –  necromancer Nov 3 '11 at 4:51

You could decompose Person into Name and Contact.

public class ComposedPerson {
    private Name name;
    private int age;
    private Contact contact;

    public ComposedPerson(Name name, int age, Contact contact) {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.contact = contact;
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        Name name = new Name("John");
        Contact contact = new Contact("12345", "john@doe.com");
        ComposedPerson person = new ComposedPerson(name, 45, contact);
   }

Sample Name. See how I use a telescoping constructor to allow for optional arguments.

public class Name {
    private String fName;
    private String lName;
    private String mInitial;

    public Name(String fName) {
        this(fName, null, null);
    }

    public Name(String fName, String lName) {
        this(fName, lName, null);
    }

    public Name(String fName, String lName, String mInitial) {
        this.fName = fName;
        this.lName = lName;
        this.mInitial = mInitial;
    }
} 
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Ohhh I see! it's like a has a relationship! is this the same as builder pattern? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 21:30
    
This is an example of a has-a relationship. Here Person has-a Name, Contact and age. –  Sahil Muthoo Nov 2 '11 at 5:21

Instead of using telescoping constructor pattern, use builder pattern

public class Person {
    private final String fName;
    private final String lName;
    private final String mInitial;
    private final int age;
    private final String contactNumber;
    private final String emailAddress;

    public Person(PersonBuilder builder) {
       //insert rest of code here 
       fName = builder.fName;
       ...
    }

    public static class PersonBuilder {
        private String fName;
        private String lName;
        private String mInitial;
        private int age;
        private String contactNumber;
        private String emailAddress;
        // setter methods
        public PersonBuilder setFirstName(String name) {
             fName = name;
             return this;
        }
        ...
        // build method
        public Person build() {
            return new Person(this);
        }

    }
}

...

Person p = new PersonBuilder()
              .setFirstName("")
              // set all the setter methods
              .build();
share|improve this answer
    
builder pattern? how is that? ? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 4:24
    
@user1023060: follow the template link –  Prince John Wesley Nov 1 '11 at 4:25
    
why downvote??? –  Prince John Wesley Nov 1 '11 at 4:29
    
"Person p = new PersonBuilder()" I thought you cannot assign variables that have different types, isn't Person has a different type? compared to PersonBuilder? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 4:43
    
@user1023060: you need to build it like this: new PersonBuilder().setFirstName("prince").setLastName("John Wesley").setAge(23).setInitial("R").build(); –  Prince John Wesley Nov 1 '11 at 4:46

Yes it is not good to have many parameters in any kind of functions. Maximum parameters should be around 7, according to a book named Code Complete 2.

It is because it will decrease the code readability and maintainability and usability. Imagine other developers working on the same project, how to follow your code?

There are lots of different ways to handle this, factory pattern, for example. It depends on how you design your application.

But in your code, I think it is ok that the no. of parameters is still acceptable (6 parameters)

If your object require so many parameters to instantiate, then you need to rethink how you design your code. For example, can some of the attributes wrap into a separate class? can some of the attribute not necessary pass as a parameter? i.e., get the value from the other class. etc...

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what's the best way to solve this dillema of mine? since I'll be making another class named Employee and extending it to this person class?? thus adding more parameters to a constructor, is there any efficient way to do this? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 4:23
    
Why downvote for my answer ? –  Kit Ho Nov 1 '11 at 4:37
    
I didn't downvote –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 5:19

I like the way iBatis handles this: by using a Map object to hold all of the parameters.

public Person(Map param){
    fName = (String)param.get("fName");
    lName = (String)param.get("lName");
    age = (Integer)param.get("age");
    ...
}

Conceptually similar to the builder pattern, but you have to do your own type checking.

Also, as long as you use different keys for different objects, you can use the same param Map to build separate but related objects, or for an object that inherits from another:

public Employee(Map param){
    super(param);
    empNo = (String)param.get("empNo");
    salary = (Integer)param.get("salary");
    ...
}

The point is that it's a lot more readable. And you can perform operations on the entire parameter set, like stripping HTML tags from them. And you don't have to create an additional Builder class for every class you make.

If your project is small enough that writing this kind of constructor is considered "tedious" then probably you don't have to care whether or not your constructor is readable or not.

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what does Map for ? isn't this long ? and more tedious? if you are going to make your own type checking? –  KyelJmD Nov 1 '11 at 4:34
1  
So classes instantiating a Person need to know about the strings that the constructor expects in the map? –  blank Nov 1 '11 at 5:12
    
That's correct. If you must, you can use reflection to get the names of the fields (and hopefully your constructor sanely uses the field names for keys). But this isn't an added restriction: anyone calling a constructor needs to know what that constructor's parameters are. –  bdares Nov 1 '11 at 5:31
2  
Parameters are listed as part of the contract, Map param tells you nothing. –  blank Nov 1 '11 at 6:05

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