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I need to change a database to add a unique constraint on a table column, but the VARCHAR data in it is not unique.

How can I update those duplicate records so that each value is unique by adding a sequential number at the end of the existing data?

e.g. I would like to change 'name' to 'name1', 'name2', 'name3'

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4 Answers 4

Here are 2 examples with using the MS SQL SERVER flavor of sql.

Setup Example:

create table test (id int identity primary key, val varchar(20) )
	--id is a pk for the cursor so it can update using "where current of"

-- name a is not duplicated
-- name b is duplicated 3 times
-- name c is duplicated 2 times

insert test values('name a')
insert test values('name b')
insert test values('name c')
insert test values('name b')
insert test values('name b')
insert test values('name c')

Sql 2005\2008: ( Computed Table Expression )

begin tran; -- Computed table expressions require the statement prior to end with ;

with cte(val,row) as (

	select val, row_number() over (partition by val order by val) row
	--partiton is important. it resets the row_number on a new val
	from test 
	where val in ( -- only return values that are duplicated
		select val
		from test
		group by val
		having count(val)>1
	)
)
update cte set val = val + ltrim(str(row))
--ltrim(str(row)) = converting the int to a string and removing the padding from the str command.

select * from test

rollback

Sql 2000: (Cursor example)

begin tran

declare @row int, @last varchar(20), @current varchar(20)
set @last = ''
declare dupes cursor
	for
	select val 
	from test 
	where val in ( -- only return values that are duplicated
		select val
		from test
		group by val
		having count(val)>1
	)
	order by val

	for update of val

open dupes
fetch next from dupes into @current
while @@fetch_status = 0
begin
	--new set of dupes, like the partition by in the 2005 example
	if @last != @current
		set @row = 1

	update test
		--@last is being set during the update statement
		set val = val + ltrim(str(@row)), @last = val
		where current of dupes

	set @row = @row + 1

	fetch next from dupes into @current
end
close dupes
deallocate dupes

select * from test

rollback

I rolled back each of the updates because my script file contains both examples. This allowed me to test the functionality without resetting the rows on the table.

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Open a cursor on the table, ordered by that column. Keep a previous value variable, initialized to null, and an index variable initialized to 0. If the current value = the previous value, increment the index and append the index to the field value. if the current value <> the previous value, reset the index to 0 and keep the field value as is. Set the previous value variable = the current value. Move on to the next row and repeat.

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You could add another column to it... like

update mytable set mycolumn = concat(mycolumn, id) 
            where id in (<select duplicate records>);

replace id with whatever column makes mycolumn unique

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What database are you using?

In Oracle there is a:

NOVALIDATE Validates changes but does not validate data previously existing in the table

Example:

ALTER TABLE <table_name> ENABLE NOVALIDATE UNIQUE;

If you are not using Oracle then check the SQL reference for your respective database.

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We're using FrontBase (which is SQL92 compliant) I want the existing data to be validated and updated –  womich Apr 28 '09 at 5:40
    
-1, sorry, this is not what he's asking. –  John M Gant Apr 28 '09 at 17:25
    
I know it is not what he asked, but I did write it before he even tell me he was using FrontBase, that I dont even know. Yet, the principle is same: the database could have something simmilar to the NOVALIDATE clause. Please don't mind the PRIMARY KEY if you think that the type of CONSTRAINT changes anything. –  Azder Apr 28 '09 at 18:45
    
The question is how to update data that would fail a desired new constraint. Your answer is to let the database ignore the failure. While interesting, that doesn't sound like a very good idea. –  Carl G Oct 10 '12 at 16:46

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