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I have a shutdown hook handler defined in a SINGLE threaded C application.

int main(int argc, char * argv[]){
    //Shutdown hook for CTRL-C
    (void) signal(SIGINT, shutdownHook);
    ...
    ...
}

So when the user hits CTRL-C the shutdown hook is initiated...

void shutdownHook(int sig){
    rc = wmq_sender_stop(errorStr);
    if (rc != 0){
        printf("\n%s\n", errorStr);
    }
    while(transactionRunning == TRUE){
        sleep(1);
        printf("Transaction still running\n");
    }
    ....
    ....
}

You can see above that I call a "wmq_sender_stop" routine (in a shared lib) that essentially sets a variable to FALSE to end a loop in that shared lib.

int wmq_sender_stop(char errorStr[ERROR_STR_LEN]){
       running = FALSE;
       ...
}

And that variable "running" will stop (hopefully) the main loop running in that shared lib.

while(running == TRUE){
...
...
}

The problem I am having is on my Linux box all works 100%...but when I install the application on a BIG powerful server it calls the "wmq_sender_stop" and sets the variable fine, but it seems like the application is running too fast on the server to allow the "while(running == TRUE)" variable to exit.....OR it is simply returning to the main application too fast and the "while(transactionRunning == TRUE)" loop just continuously runs...

Essentially on the BIG server if I hit CRTL-C the following is continuosly output to the screen:

Transaction still running
Transaction still running
Transaction still running
Transaction still running
Transaction still running
Transaction still running
...

Perhaps I need to make threads here and have intercommunication between them but is their no easier way to elegantly allow a "loop in a shared lib" to end it's "critical code / transactions" before shutting down even on extremely fast servers? And why does it work on my linux laptop?

And if I need to use threads what is the best and FASTEST way for them to comminucate? Currently I am using CALLBACKS....but am not sure what the best IPC is for threads?

Thanks for the help, much appreciated

Lynton

share|improve this question
    
What sets 'transactionRunning' to FALSE on your Linux box? If it is a single-threaded application, it is not the 'sleep/printf' loop that changes it... – Jonathan Leffler Nov 1 '11 at 6:55
1  
In general it's not idea to do long-running tasks in a signal handler (or I/O). Instead in the signal handler send a "signal" to the main thread and do all the work there. – Joachim Pileborg Nov 1 '11 at 7:01
    
As you say the app is single threaded, the shared lib has no chance to exit its loop as the app loops and waits in the SIGINT handler. An interessting fact is that it looks as if it would work the way you wish it should on your linux box, although it should not. The behaviour on the server looks perfectly alright to me. – alk Nov 1 '11 at 7:39
    
The transactionRunning is set to FALSE after the current transaction is complete....meaning that the shared lib issues multiple callbacks to the main application like "onMessageArrived", "onCommit" etc...and all those callbacks are in the shared lib loop... – Lynton Grice Nov 1 '11 at 8:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make sure that running (and transactionRunning, too) is declared as volatile. Otherwise, the C compiler may cache its value under some circumstances. For now, think of volatile as meaning "this value could get changed by a signal handler".

Note that you have to be careful with code like this:

rc = wmq_sender_stop(errorStr);

If you do that in a signal handler, you had better hope that that function is safe to call from a signal handler. Most functions aren't. (Even functions that are safe to call from multiple threads are unsafe to call from a signal handler.)

The last issue is that if your code is single-threaded, but you never return from your signal handler, how is your main loop supposed to exit? The signal handler runs in one of your application's existing threads. Generally the only thing you want to do in a signal handler is change the value of a global variable that is marked volatile and then return.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point: I fully agree with declaring running as volatile. I would have voted up your answer, if you'd explained why wmq_sender_stop may be unsafed to be called from a signal handler. – alk Nov 1 '11 at 8:15
    
@alk: I don't know anything about wmq_sender_stop, so I have no reason to assume that it is safe. Most functions are not safe to call from a signal handler (including printf, for example). No need to tell people you're withholding upvotes, you can just ask for a clarification. – Dietrich Epp Nov 1 '11 at 9:47
    
Ok, assuming the worst case is the most secure approach, thanks clarifing ... - and please excuse my irrelevant side note on voting. – alk Nov 1 '11 at 10:29
    
Regarding safe/unsafe calls in signal handlers this post gives further explanations/references: stackoverflow.com/questions/3127649/… – alk Nov 3 '11 at 6:50

Why not just call wmq_sender_stop() and than leave the signal handler via return. The loop in the shared lib will exit and so your app will do, won't it?

share|improve this answer
    
But is there not a timing issue then? What happens if the main application ends BEFORE the loop in the shard lib has ended? – Lynton Grice Nov 1 '11 at 8:01
    
@Lynton Grice Why should the main app end end? – alk Nov 1 '11 at 8:04

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