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In our code base

public ActionResult Copy(string id, string targetId)
            {
                //lot of similar code
                Copy(sourcePageRef, destinationPageRef);
                //lot of similar code
            }

and

public ActionResult Move(string id, string targetId)
        {
            //lot of similar code
            Move(sourcePageRef, destinationPageRef);
            //lot of similar code
        }

the problem is, Copy and Move have different signatures:

PageRef Copy(PageRef, PageRef)

and

void Move(PageRef, PageRef)

How can I refactor these methods to avoid duplication? Thank you

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This is generally where you would use a façade pattern if you can discard the result of your Copy operation. Implement Copy and Move in your façade with the same signature, then you can call them reflectively or however you like. Otherwise, I'd start by moving common code into helper methods. –  Art Taylor Nov 1 '11 at 7:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you don't need the result of Copy, you could still use an Action<string, string> or whatever the type is:

public ActionResult Copy(string id, string targetId)
{
    CopyOrMove((x, y) => Copy(x, y));
}

public ActionResult Move(string id, string targetId)
{
    CopyOrMove(id, targetId, (x, y) => Move(x, y));
}

private void CopyOrMove(string id, string targetId,
                        Action<string, string> fileAction)
{
    // lot of similar code
    fileAction(sourcePageRef, destinationPageRef);
    // lot of similar code
}

That's one option. It depends on what the "lot of similar code" is really doing, and whether the second block needs the results of the first block. For example, if you could do this:

public ActionResult Copy(string id, string targetId)
{
    string sourcePageRef = PrepareSourceFile(id, targetId);
    string targetPageRef = PrepareTargetFile(targetId);
    Copy(sourcePageRef, targetPageRef);
    CleanUp(sourcePageRef, targetPageRef);
    return ...;
}

public ActionResult Move(string id, string targetId)
{
    string sourcePageRef = PrepareSourceFile(id, targetId);
    string targetPageRef = PrepareTargetFile(targetId);
    Move(sourcePageRef, targetPageRef);
    CleanUp(sourcePageRef, targetPageRef);
    return ...;
}

... then that's probably simpler than the refactoring-with-a-delegate approach.

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solve my problem perfectly! thank you –  Vimvq1987 Nov 1 '11 at 8:01

I would not refactor those methods, but if it's possible, put the content of those methods into separate private function which in one case Moves data, in another Copies. So methods provided by you can use it. It's very clear from the name of the method what it does, do not change it IMHO, considering that they are public and visible to your class consumer too.

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Extract these :

//lot of similar code

to their own methods and just call them from your Move or Copy methods.

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I see 2 options: option A) use decompose method to extract common code, and class that code from each duplicated method:

  Copy(,) {
    CommonCodeA();
    Copy(..);
    CommonCodeB();
  }

  Move(,) {
    CommonCodeA();
    Move(..);
    CommonCodeB();
  }

  CommonCodeA() {...}

  CommonCodeB() {...}

option B) use the Template Method refactoring: put the common code in a superclass method, and make this method call an abstract method(s) for the specific code. Then create a subclass for each duplicated method, that implements the abstract method(s).

 class OperationAction {

      operation() {
           //lots of code
           do(,);
           //lots of code
      }
      abstract do();
 }

 class CopyAction extends OperationAction {
     do() {
          Copy(srcref,destref);
     }
     Copy(srcref,destref) { ... }
 }

 class MoveAction extends OperationAction {
     do() {
          Move(srcref,destref);
     }
     Move(srcref,destref) { ... }
 }
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