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I have a program that needs to run a function M times per iteration, and those runs can be parallelized. Lets say I'm limited to running N threads at a time (say by the number of cores available). I need an algorithm that will make sure I'm always running N threads (so long as the number of threads remaining is >= N) and that algorithm needs to be invariant to the completion order of those threads. Also, the thread scheduling algorithm should not claim significant CPU time.

I have something like the following in mind, but its clearly flawed.

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <cstdlib>

void *find_num(void* arg)
{
    double num = rand();
    for(double q=0; 1; q++)
        if(num == q)
        {
            std::cout << "\n--";
            return 0;
        }
}


int main ()
{
    srand(0);

    const int N = 2;
    pthread_t threads [N];
    for(int q=0; q<N; q++)
        pthread_create(&threads [q], NULL, find_num, NULL);

    int M = 30;
    int launched=N;
    int finnished=0;
    while(1)
    {
        for(int w=0; w<N; w++)
        {
            //inefficient if `threads [1]` done before `threads [2]`
            pthread_join( threads [w], NULL);
            finnished++;
            std::cout << "\n" << finnished;
            if(finnished == M)
                break;
            if(launched < M)
            {
                pthread_create(&threads [w], NULL, find_num, NULL);
                launched++;
            }
        }

        if(finnished == M)
            break;
    }
}

The obvious problem here is that if threads[1] finishes before threads[0] there is wasted CPU time, and I can't think of how to get around that. Also, I'm assuming that having the main routine waiting on pthread_join() is not a significant drain on CPU time?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would advice against respawining threads, it's a rather serious overhead. Instead, create a pool of N threads and submit work to them via a work-queue, a rather standard approach. Even if your remaining work is less than N, the extra threads will not do any harm, they'll just stay there blocked in the work-queue.

If you insist on your current approach you can do like this:

Do not wait for threads with pthread_join, you don't need it, since you're not communicating anything back to the main thread. Create the threads with the attribute PTHREAD_CREATE_DETACHED and just let them exit.

In the main thread, wait on a semaphore, which is signaled by each exiting thread - in effect you would wait for any thread termination. If you don't have <semaphore.h> for any reason, it's trivial to implement it with mutexes and conditions.

#include <semaphore.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <cstdlib>

sem_t exit_sem;

void *find_num(void* arg)
{
    double num = rand();
    for(double q=0; 1; q++)
        if(num == q)
        {
            std::cout << "\n--";
            return 0;
        }

    /* Tell the main thread we have exited.  */
    sem_post (&exit_sem);
    return NULL;
}

int main ()
{
    srand(0);

    /* Initialize pocess private semaphore with 0 initial count.  */
    sem_init (&exit_sem, 0, 0);
    const int N = 2;

    pthread_attr_t attr;
    pthread_attr_init (&attr);
    pthread_attr_setdetachstate (&attr, PTHREAD_CREATE_DETACHED);
    for(int q=0; q<N; q++)
        pthread_create(NULL, &attr, find_num, NULL);

    int M = 30;
    int launched=N;
    int finnished=0;
    while(1)
    {
        for(int w=0; w<N; w++)
        {
            /* Wait for any thread to exit, don't care which.  */
            sem_wait (&exit_sem);

            finnished++;
            std::cout << "\n" << finnished;
            if(finnished == M)
                break;
            if(launched < M)
            {
                pthread_create(NULL, &attr, find_num, NULL);
                launched++;
            }
        }

        if(finnished == M)
            break;
    }
}

Anyway, I would again recommend thread-pool/work-queue approach.

share|improve this answer
    
So it seems that with this system there would be no sense in using more than one pthread_t (we could just start all threads with the same one). I'm not familiar with work queues, how are they implemented? are they part of pthread? Also, just curious, but how does sem_wait or pthread_join avoid the problem of excessive looping while waiting for a flag? –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 8:52
    
@MattMunson, I edited it a bit, you don't need any pthread_t. Work queues is a common design pattern, not a part of POSIX Threads, just google it. The functions sem_wait and pthread_join (and many others) cause the thread to block (if needed) and the kernel to schedule other threads, until something cause the blocked thread to be woken up. Check en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Process_state it's part of the very first basics taught in any operating systems course. –  chill Nov 1 '11 at 9:00
1  
+1 for an alternative, efficient approach that does not involve join and the semaphore solution. I can only presume that, somewhere out there, there is a reccommended book for Computer Science 101: 'How To Use Threads', that says '1) Always join threads and wait for the thread to finish. 2) Don't bother reading up on OS synchro primitives - they are too difficult to use. 3) Spend a lot of time adding a scheduling layer on top of the OS - the team of highly-experienced developers that wrote the kernel were rubbish.' I'm not normally into book-burning, but... –  Martin James Nov 1 '11 at 9:01
    
@chill how do I go about sleeping the threads between queues, I guess I would do it with semaphores again? –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 9:19
    
sleeping and looping-to-wait are both concepts you should abandon when you start to write multithreaded apps. Threads should either be executing work or waiting on a synchronisation primitive (mutex, semaphore). The waiting part is taken care of by the OS's scheduler, not by you spinning and checking anything. –  RobH Nov 1 '11 at 10:22

If main() is waiting on pthread_join then (assuming that on your platform it isn't implemented as just a spin lock) it will cause no CPU load; If pthread_join is waiting on a mutex then the scheduler won't give that thread any time until that mutex is signalled.

If N truly is the number of cores then maybe you should forget about managing the thread scheduling yourself; The OS scheduler will take care of that. If N is less than the number or cores, perhaps you could set thread affinity to run your process on N cores only (or spawn a calculation process which does that, if you don't want to set thread affinity for the rest of your process); Again, the point of doing this would be to let the OS scheduler deal with scheduling.

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I read somewhere that there are/can be limits to how many threads the OS will allow at once, both per process and system-wide total. What if the number of threads I need to run is greater than that? It seems like limiting # of threads to # of cores is an easy and practical way around that. –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 8:14
    
@Matt Munson - there is a limit and is very large. Within one process on a 32-bit system, developers ususally run into virtual adddress space limitiations first because of the ridiculously large stack space usually allocated for thread stacks. The Windows box on which I post this has 1036 threads loaded in total at the moment, top process 'sidebar.exe' - 68 threads. Performance is fine. Linux will be similar. –  Martin James Nov 1 '11 at 9:32
    
If you were thinking of creating one thread for each of a large number of tasks, that would be A Bad Idea, because as @MartinJames says there is a memory cost (stack space per thread) and also a thread startup time cost. I'd heartily recommend a work queue as per chill's answer. –  RobH Nov 1 '11 at 10:18

The simple solution is to have a global variable that gets set when a thread is done, and the main loop polls that variable to check when the tread is done and only does pthread_join then.

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I guess that polling would be done with a loop. Would incessant looping of that sort be a drain on the CPU? –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 8:22
    
@MattMunson: If you add some kind of sleep (see man usleep for example) in the loop, it won't be noticeable. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 1 '11 at 8:28
    
How would I know how long to sleep for? –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 8:31
2  
Introducing arbitrary delays before allowing the program to do more work contradicts with the goal of performance improvement via the maximum effective degree of parallelization. Polling is only justified in very very limited number of cases, when it can spare the overheads of trapping into the kernel doing a context switch. Polling with a timeout is the very very last resort and generally indicates a failure to design a proper algorithm. –  chill Nov 1 '11 at 8:44
    
@chill: I didn't say my solution was good, just that it's simple. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 1 '11 at 8:57

I'd most definitely look at OpenMP or C++11 async. To be honest, at this point I think that OpenMP is more viable.

OpenMP

Here is a quick example that will sometimes find the correct answer (42) randomly, using 2 threads.

Note that if you leave out the omp.h include and the call to omp_set_num_threads(2); you'll get the native number of threads (i.e. depending on the number of cores available at runtime). OpenMP also let's you configure this number dynamically by setting the environment variable e.g. OMP_NUM_THREADS=16. Indeed you can dynamically disable parallelism in whole :)

I even threw in a sample thread parameter and result accumulation - this is usually where things become a little more interesting then just kicking off a job and forgetting about it. Then again, it may be overkill for your question :)

Compiled with g++ -fopenmp test.cpp -o test

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <omp.h>

int find_num(int w)
{
    return rand() % 100;
}

int main ()
{
    srand(time(0));

    omp_set_num_threads(2); // optional! leave it out to get native number of threads

    bool found = false;

#pragma omp parallel for reduction (|:found)
    for(int w=0; w<30; w++)
    {
        if (!found) 
        {
             found = (find_num(w) == 42);
        }
    }

    std::cout << "number was found: " << (found? "yes":"no") << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
looks cool. I'm not familiar with some of the syntax though. What does that #pragma macro do? –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 8:26
    
@MattMunson: read all about it on wikipedia, GNU OpenMP, and various other compiler vendor documentation. Note that OpenMP is standard, portable and has implementations for C, C++, Fortran (more?) –  sehe Nov 1 '11 at 8:31
    
Oh... not my favourite: openmp.org/wp; Blogs are surprisingly good introductions: Thinking Parallel and this post [viva64.com/en/a/0054/](OpenMP Traps For C++ Developers); Yes, reading the traps was the best introduction for me :) –  sehe Nov 1 '11 at 8:35
    
does the above code start one thread per iteration of the loop or two? Its important that I be able to pass a different argument for each thread. –  Matt Munson Nov 1 '11 at 8:38
    
@mattmunson: no, omp works with thread teams and schedules the work without creating new threads. Look closely how my sample already passses the loop variable (w) to find_num –  sehe Nov 1 '11 at 8:42

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