Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

please review the code: I want to check input parameters of function, Domian Conway in PBP offer to use croak, is it correct? i change code to pass http://perlcritic.com/ but may be added $rs = say "$r->{foo} <= $check_value"; excess

#!/usr/bin/perl
##############################################################################
#      $URL: http://mishin.narod.ru $
#     $Date: 2011-11-01 16:32:04 +0400 (Nov, 01 Nov 2011) $
#   $Author: mishnik $
# $Revision: 1.02 $
#   $Source: test  check variables $
#   $Description:  check input parameters of function
#   $ Domian Conway in PBP offer to use croak, is it correct? $
#   01-11-2011:
#   put question to
#   http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7963866/is-it-correct-way-to-check-function-input-values
##############################################################################

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use Carp qw(cluck carp);
use Data::Dumper;
use Readonly;
use autodie;

our $VERSION = '0.01';

Readonly my $CHECK_LEVEL => 100;

my %filials;
my $ref_hash = \%filials;
my @test     = qw/444 33a 2 d 300 ffd 22/;
my $ret;
for my $test_val (@test) {
    $filials{foo} = $test_val;
    $ret = test_var( \%filials, $CHECK_LEVEL )
      || carp("couldn't invoke test_var \%filials, $CHECK_LEVEL ");
}

sub test_var {
    my $r           = shift;
    my $check_value = shift;

    #check if input parameters is correct
    carp( "ERROR: \$r->{foo} is not defined or not number, \$r:\n" . Dumper($r) )
      if !defined $r->{foo}
          || $r->{foo} !~ /^\d+$/xms;

    #check values by business rule
    if ( $r->{foo} > $check_value ) {
        say "$r->{foo} > $check_value";
    }
    else {
        say "$r->{foo} <= $check_value";
    }
    return 1;
}

so my perlcritic_profile.perlcriticrc is only

severity = 1

[-InputOutput::RequireCheckedSyscalls]

old version

use 5.01;
use Carp;
use Data::Dumper;
my %filials;
$filials{boo} = 200;
$filials{foo} = 300;
my $ref_hash = \%filials;
my @test     = qw/444 33a 2 d 300 ffd 22/;

for $test_val (@test) {
    $filials{foo} = $test_val;
    test_var( \%filials );
}

sub test_var {
    my $r = shift;
    croak(  "Value \$r->{foo}***$r->{foo}*** is not defined or not number."
          . "\nDump \$r="
          . Dumper($r) )
      if !defined $r->{foo}
          || $r->{foo} !~ /^\d+$/;
    say $r->{foo};
    if ( $r->{foo} > 100 ) {
        say '$r->{foo} > 100';
    }
    else {
        say '$r->{foo} <= 100';
    }
}

2Alexandr Ciornii use the module Attribute:: Signature is also not suitable because of an error CODE package attribute may clash with future reserved word: returns at - line 46 CODE package attributes may clash with future reserved words: with: returns at - line 60

#!/usr/bin/perl
##############################################################################
#      $URL: http://mishin.narod.ru $
#     $Date: 2011-11-01 16:32:04 +0400 (Nov, 01 Nov 2011) $
#   $Author: mishnik $
# $Revision: 1.02 $
#   $Source: test  check variables $
#   $Description:  check input parameters of function
#   $ Domian Conway in PBP offer to use croak, is it correct? $
#   01-11-2011:
#   put question to
#   http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7963866/is-it-correct-way-to-check-function-input-values
##############################################################################

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use Carp qw(cluck carp);
use Data::Dumper;
use Readonly;

#use autodie;
use Attribute::Signature;

our $VERSION = '0.01';

#run main procedure
main();

sub main : returns(integer) {

    #make test for chack input parameters
    Readonly my $CHECK_LEVEL => 100;
    my %filials;
    my $ref_hash = \%filials;
    my @test     = qw/444 33a 2 d 300 ffd 22/;
    my $ret;
    for my $test_val (@test) {
        $ref_hash->{foo} = $test_val;
        $ret = test_var( $ref_hash->{foo}, $CHECK_LEVEL )
          || carp("couldn't invoke test_var \%filials, $CHECK_LEVEL ");
    }

    return 1;
}

sub test_var : with(integer, integer) returns(integer) {
    my $evaluated_value = shift;
    my $check_value     = shift;

    #check values by business rule
    if ( $evaluated_value > $check_value ) {
        say "$evaluated_value > $check_value";
    }
    else {
        say "$evaluated_value <= $check_value";
    }
    return 1;
}
share|improve this question
3  
1  
I would live the old version in the question, otherwise nobody will understand the answers. Second you don't have to do everything Perl::Critic says. Checking the return value of say is a little bit too much if you are writing to the console and not to a file. –  Matteo Nov 1 '11 at 13:29
2  
s/use 5.01/use 5.010/ equivalent, but clearer. –  Eric Strom Nov 1 '11 at 14:53
    
thanks, yes old version - useful –  Николай Мишин Nov 1 '11 at 14:57
add comment

3 Answers

Some comments

  • use strict and warnings it will help you detect errors

    use strict;
    use warnings;
    
  • you might consider checking Perl::Critic (there is an online version)

  • always declare variables: even loop iterators

    for my $test_val (@test) {   
    
  • strings in single quotes are not interpolated (a $ is printed as $). Use double quotes:

    say "$r->{foo} > 100";
    
  • croak terminates the program. Since in you test you wanted to check more than one value use carp: it will print a warning but continue

  • always use return at the end of a subroutine: it will help to make explicit what is returned (otherwise perl automatically returns the result of the last performed evaluation)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks i make code to pass perlcritic.com and carp: is super function that is necessary for me –  Николай Мишин Nov 1 '11 at 13:14
    
and now, do you think is it all ok? –  Николай Мишин Nov 1 '11 at 13:23
1  
Don't check for the return value of say. If will hardly fail when writing to standard output. And in any case if you are not able to write to standard out it will be impossible to generate an error. Check for the return value of print/say when you are writing to a file (in this case something could go wrong) –  Matteo Nov 1 '11 at 14:30
    
thanks, i put right variant to gist gist.github.com/1330710 –  Николай Мишин Nov 1 '11 at 15:01
    
i think stackoverflow.com needed version of answer such as in gist.github.com –  Николай Мишин Nov 1 '11 at 15:03
add comment

The first issues I see:

  • no use strict; use warnings; at the top
  • single quotes in the say argument keep the variables from being expanded

Try Code Review !

share|improve this answer
    
i think use 5.01; add this automatically, but I was wrong, thanks –  Николай Мишин Nov 1 '11 at 8:25
add comment

I used Attribute::Signature for some time, even released a new version. But later decided that for me sub params are too rare a problem, so I decided to stop using it.

share|improve this answer
    
i try this module, but i had a problen –  Николай Мишин Nov 2 '11 at 6:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.