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I want to create an SDK that consist of a header file sdk.h with the public API and a compiled DLL with the implementation.

If the code looks like:
//////////
// sdk.h
//////////

enum eAction
{
    Action1,
    Action2,
    Action3
};


class Item
{
protected:
    virtual ~Item(){}
public:
    virtual void Do(eAction action) = 0;
    virtual  void Release()  = 0;
};

extern "C"
{
    Item * CreateItem();
}


//////////
// sdk.cpp
//////////

class ItemImpl: public Item
{
public:

    virtual void Do(eAction action)
    {
        printf("%d", (int)action);
        // do something
    }

    virtual  void Release()
    {
        delete this;
    }
};


Item * CreateItem()
{
    return new ItemImpl;
}


//////////
// main.cpp client side
//////////

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Item *pItem = CreateItem();

    pItem->Do(Action1);

    pItem->Release();

    return 0;
}

// The file sdk.h is the public API.
// The file sdk.cpp is the implementation and it is compiled to sdk.dll.
// The file main.cpp is the client code that uses the SDK.

My question is:

Is it safe to use enum params and return values in the public API (the method Do(action)) if the SDK and the client code are compiled with different compilers? For example the SDK is compiled with VC and the client code with gcc. Is it possible the different compilers to use different size (2,4 or 8 bytes) to represent the enum?

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Different sizes are permitted by the standard, the important issue (to which I don't know the answer, hence this is a comment) is whether the C++ ABI(s) on the platform(s) you care about, specify how to decide the underlying type of the enum. If you don't know what platforms you care about, then you have to treat it as not part of the ABI and hence you can't pass an enum across the executable boundary any more than you could pass a std::string. –  Steve Jessop Nov 1 '11 at 10:48
    
I think this is an example of a real-life conflict: osdir.com/ml/android-ndk/2010-10/msg00559.html. Assuming the post is true, Android's toolchain is configured to use short enums where possible by default, but some libstdc++ dlls for it use at least int. Hence an enum that fits in a short is incompatible between the two unless you compile with -fno-short-enums. So if your "two compilers" are both GCC, but one with and one without -fshort-enums then what you propose is potentially unsafe. If parameters smaller than int are passed as int you might get away with it. –  Steve Jessop Nov 1 '11 at 10:59
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2 Answers

From my understanding, the compiler is allowed to choose the final size representing the enum, however you can also force the size to be a minimum by defining an unused value to say, ActionForceDword = 0xFFFFFFFF.

Alternately, you can declare the parameter as an integer type. You're still at the mercy of the compilers agreeing on the size of the given type however.

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It is possible for different compilers to give different sizes to your enum, but for a good design, that shouldn't matter. I mean... you wouldn't stop using int just because it has different sizes on different platforms, would you?

EDIT:

If you do insist on your types having the same size, use a int32 instead of enum. There's no way (at least portable way) to guarantee that an enum will have the same size on all platforms.

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I don't use int in the public API. I use types like int32_t. I don't know what you mean by "good design", but the main goal is the code to work when used with different compilers. –  user1017802 Nov 1 '11 at 9:05
    
In a good design you use something like returnValue == Action1, so the storage space shouldn't matter. Why are you worried about this? –  Luchian Grigore Nov 1 '11 at 9:08
    
The storage would matter because the enum is a param to a method. One compiler generates the code that pushes the input params into the stack and another compiler generates the code that pops the params from the stack. If the first compiler treats the enum as 2 bytes and the second compiler threats the enum as 4 bytes then I expect that the code will not work correctly (crash). –  user1017802 Nov 1 '11 at 9:53
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