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i got a class which holds info about pictures, like filepath, hashvalue, bytes. in another class i got a generic list where i put objects from the class that holds picture info.

that class looks like this:

[Serializable()]
    class PicInfo : ISerializable
    {
        public string fileName { get; set; }
        public string completeFileName { get; set; }
        public string filePath { get; set; }
        public byte[] hashValue { get; set; }

        public PicInfo()
        { }

        public PicInfo(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext ctxt)
        {
            this.fileName = (string)info.GetValue("fileName", typeof(string));
            this.completeFileName = (string)info.GetValue("completeFileName", typeof(string));
            this.filePath = (string)info.GetValue("filePath", typeof(string));
            this.hashValue = (byte[])info.GetValue("hashValue", typeof(byte[]));
        }

        public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext ctxt)
        {
            info.AddValue("fileName", this.fileName);
            info.AddValue("completeFileName", this.completeFileName);
            info.AddValue("filePath", this.filePath);
            info.AddValue("hashValue", this.hashValue);
        }
    }

my list is just list<picinfo> pi = new list<picinfo>(); what would be the eaziest way to serialize this list?

share|improve this question
    
You should really clarify your question a bit more. What serialization format are you looking for? Human readable? Binary? More information please –  rossipedia Nov 1 '11 at 8:58
1  
It will work just fine without using ISerializable. .NET can serialize it all for use easily enough..? –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 1 '11 at 8:59
    
the format should be binary, sorry for not telling this. –  Yustme Nov 1 '11 at 9:05
    
@mtijn incorrect; that only applies to XmlSerializer –  Marc Gravell Nov 1 '11 at 9:06
    
@Yustme if you are using BinaryFormatter (which I assume you are), it will be binary whether or not you implement ISerializable. I strongly suggest not implementing ISerializable unless you have good reason (but then: I also strongly suggest not using BinaryFormatter in the first place ;p) –  Marc Gravell Nov 1 '11 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you want to use BinaryFormatter (which I really don't advise), you can use:

[Serializable]
class PicInfo
{
    public string fileName { get; set; }
    public string completeFileName { get; set; }
    public string filePath { get; set; }
    public byte[] hashValue { get; set; }

    public PicInfo()  { }
}
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        List<PicInfo> pi = new List<PicInfo>();
        pi.Add(new PicInfo {fileName = "foo.bar", hashValue = new byte[] {1, 2, 3}});

        var ser = new BinaryFormatter();
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            ser.Serialize(ms, pi);
            var bytes = ms.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

If you want to use XmlSerializer (probably preferable IMO), but need the byte[], then:

public class PicInfo
{
    public string fileName { get; set; }
    public string completeFileName { get; set; }
    public string filePath { get; set; }
    public byte[] hashValue { get; set; }

    public PicInfo()  { }
}
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        List<PicInfo> pi = new List<PicInfo>();
        pi.Add(new PicInfo {fileName = "foo.bar", hashValue = new byte[] {1, 2, 3}});

        var ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<PicInfo>));
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            ser.Serialize(ms, pi);
            var bytes = ms.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

Personally, I'd use protobuf-net:

[ProtoContract]
public class PicInfo
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]public string fileName { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(2)]public string completeFileName { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(3)]public string filePath { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(4)]public byte[] hashValue { get; set; }

    public PicInfo()  { }
}
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        List<PicInfo> pi = new List<PicInfo>();
        pi.Add(new PicInfo {fileName = "foo.bar", hashValue = new byte[] {1, 2, 3}});

        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            Serializer.Serialize(ms, pi);
            var bytes = ms.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

Sizes:

  • BinaryFormatter: 488 bytes
  • XmlSerializer: 251 bytes
  • protobuf-net: 16 bytes
share|improve this answer
    
hi, it should not be an xml file, just a txt file. btw, can u explain why not the binaryformatter? –  Yustme Nov 1 '11 at 9:17
2  
@Yustme very few serializers are going to write "just a txt file" - they will be formatted; perhaps bespoke binary, perhaps xml, perhaps json - but never "just a txt file" (unless you count xml or json as "just text"). Re BinaryFormatter: many reasons; it has a habit of being version intolerant, it is not cross-platform (for example, useless even on Silverlight), it is slow, and it has overweight output. Even invisible changes like making something an automatically implemented property will break it. Oh, and it tends to suck in unwanted objects via events. –  Marc Gravell Nov 1 '11 at 9:21
    
i see. i got one more question, can i deserialize this again? –  Yustme Nov 1 '11 at 9:44
1  
@Yustme absolutely! (btw, you can trivially replace the MemoryStream here with a FileStream if you are writing to disk). With MemoryStream just set the .Position back to 0. With a FileStream you would just File.OpenRead(path) to get the stream. –  Marc Gravell Nov 1 '11 at 9:47
    
worked perfectly, thanks! –  Yustme Nov 1 '11 at 11:23

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