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I want to put some error handling in my code. I can not figure out how to do it for following example:

public class DataPoints
{
   public PointF[] RawData {get; set;} //raw measurement pairs
   public float xMax; //max value on X axis
   public float yMax; //max value on Y axis

   public float GetMaxX()
   {
       if(RawData == null)
       {
          throw new NullReferenceException();
          return null; //THIS does not compile! I want to exit the method here
       }

     //DO other stuff to find max X
     return MAX_X; //as float
   }
}

So the idea is, I need to check if RawData is already set then do the rest of stuff in GetMaxX() method. Is this a good practice at all? What would you do in this case?

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If you are interested in returning null then go for nullable datatype, here it expects you to return a float value (null is not valid) –  V4Vendetta Nov 1 '11 at 9:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two issues with this code,

First off you're throwing an exception, followed by a return - the return statement will never be hit as the exception will stop execution of the rest of the method, making the return statement superfluous.

Secondly, you can't return null when the return type is float; you'd have to change the return type to be float? (see: nullable types)

So either, if it is a real error case, as there is nothing you can do go with just the exception:

   public float GetMaxX()
   {
       if(RawData == null)
          throw new NullReferenceException();

     //DO other stuff to find max X
     return MAX_X; //as float
   }

Or alternatively, return the null and drop the exception:

   public float? GetMaxX()
   {
       if(RawData == null)
          return null; 

     //DO other stuff to find max X
     return MAX_X; //as float
   }

Personally, if RawData being null is an error condition / exceptional circumstance that should never happen then I would say throw the exception, and handle the exception if thrown in the calling code.

An alternative approach would be to force initialisation of RawData through the constructor, make RawData private (or at least the setter) and throwing the exception there. Leaving any other logic within the class clean of any exception throwing / null-checking as it can assume that RawData will have been set previously.

Resulting in something along the lines of:

public class DataPoints
{
    private readonly PointF[] rawData; //raw measurement pairs
    public float xMax; //max value on X axis
    public float yMax; //max value on Y axis

    public DataPoints(PointF[] rawData)
    {
        if (rawData == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("rawData");

        this.rawData = rawData;
    }

    public float GetMaxX()
    {
        //DO other stuff to find max X
        return MAX_X; //as float
    }
}
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If you're throwing an exception the return statement will not be executed anyway so the correct version of what you're attempting would be

  public float GetMaxX()
  {
      if(RawData == null)
      {
         throw new NullReferenceException();
      }

      //DO other stuff to find max X
      return MAX_X; //as float
   }

The return statement wouldn't compile because float is a value type which can never be null unless you use the nullable type float?

Personally from the code sample you've given I would throw the exception as you currently expose the RawData object via a public setter so you have no guarantee that it won't be null when GetMaxX is called. The exception can then be propagated up the stack and be caught at any level, whereas by making the return type nullable you would have to add additional checks to the calling code to see whether your method had returned null and handle that appropriately.

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I'm not clear on what you want to do in case of error. Do you want to throw an exception or return null?

Generally speaking, throwing an exception is for when the caller should have known better and you don't want to try to recover - let the caller clean up the mess.

Returning null is for when the caller might have had a good reason for not initializing RawData, which makes sense in your case. For that you need to have

public float? GetMaxX()

If you really want to blow up when nothing is initialized, put RawData as a parameter in your constructor.

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You can remove the return statement that is below the throw exception statement. Whenever an exception is thrown, no other statement is executed in the method (finally blocks are an exception to this, but irrevelant in this context).

Except this problem about the function, I have an argument about the RawData property being accessible publicly. It is not generally a good idea to open a collection like that. As @sq33G suggests, you can guarantee to have a valid object by passing RawData as a constructor parameter. And you can fail early in the constructor when an invalid array is passed (null, maybe of size zero?).

private PointF[] _rawData;

public DataPoints(PointF[] rawData)
{
    if(rawData == null || rawData.Length == 0)
        throw new ArgumentException("RawData should not be null and should contain at least one element");
    this._rawData = rawData;
}

If it is neccessary that RawSata be accessible from outside of the class, I suggest you to do it in a way that neither the array itself (so no setter) nor its content can be altered. Using an IEnumerable is a proper way of doing it.

public IEnumerable<PointF> RawData
{
    get { return _rawData; }
}
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A method is not always required to return a value; in particular, it is also allowed to exit by throwing an exception (in which case no value is returned). You can checked the rule here

In your example you can either

(a) raise an NullReferenceException - Which will break the flow and return

(b) return a default value if the RawData is null - Which will break the flow and return a default value.

float f()
    {
        if (RawData == null)
        {
            throw new NullReferenceException();
            return default(float);
        }
        return doOtherOperation(RawData);
    }

    float doOtherOperation(PointF[] RawData)
    {
        //do what you wanted to do
        return default(float);
    }
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