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I use Ninject but this should apply to any IoC. I have a singleton with a background thread running, the thread runs for the entire lifespan of the program. Each 5 minutes the background thread starts a couple of workers. These workers are injected using an autofac

Func<IEnumerable<IWorker>>

But this only takes care of some of the problem, let me explain, some of my workers have dependency to repositories and each repository have dependency to the Entity framework context which have a thread scope (It will be disposed when the thread ends). This means that when the autofac is executed and i get a list of workers their scope will be on the background thread that has the same lifetime as the program, not good to have a EF context that lives for the entire app. Each workers Execute method is executed in a seperate thread, but this does offcourse not matter because Ninject will still only listen to the main background thread which will never end.

I have solved this for now in a very ugly way if you ask me, I inject a none generic factory

Func<Type, object> 

I then ask the assembly to return all concrete types of the IWorker interface and I then use the factory method to invoke them in each worker thread (Which means the scope will only be for the worker thread and not the background thead), this works, but it's ugly and I cant stub the IWorkers which means I cant run my units tests any more.

Do you guys have a nice solution for me? :D Thanks

edit: Thanks for the help Remo, the named scope part now works, but the original problem still exists.. This is my test code

The WorkManager

internal class WorkflowManager : IWorkflowManager
{
    private readonly Func<IWorker> testWorker;
    private BackgroundWorker backgroundWorker;

    public WorkflowManager(Func<IWorker> testWorker)
    {
        this.testWorker = testWorker;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
        backgroundWorker.DoWork += DoBackgroundWork;
        backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {

    }

    private void DoBackgroundWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        var test = testWorker();
    }

}

Its binding

kernel.Bind<IWorkflowManager>().To<WorkflowManager>().InSingletonScope();

The Worker

internal class TestWorker : IWorker, IDisposable
{
    public TestWorker()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Contructed!");
    }

    ~TestWorker()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Deconstructed!");
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Disposed!");
    }

}

Binding

kernel.Bind<IWorker>().To<TestWorker>().InCallScope();

Only the constructor gets called... :/

share|improve this question

Use https://github.com/ninject/ninject.extensions.namedscope/wiki/InCallScope. Using this scope will dispose the dependencies when the worker gets garbage collected or released from the cache.

Setup the application like this. The next version does not require this workaround anymore.

public static class NinjectMVC3 
{
    private static readonly Bootstrapper bootstrapper = new Bootstrapper();

    /// <summary>
    /// Starts the application
    /// </summary>
    public static void Start() 
    {
        DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule(typeof(OnePerRequestModule));
        DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule(typeof(HttpApplicationInitializationModule));
        bootstrapper.Initialize(CreateKernel);
        bootstrapper.Kernel.Rebind<IResolutionRoot>().To<ContextPreservingResolutionRoot>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Stops the application.
    /// </summary>
    public static void Stop()
    {
        bootstrapper.ShutDown();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates the kernel that will manage your application.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The created kernel.</returns>
    private static IKernel CreateKernel()
    {
        var kernel = new StandardKernel();
        RegisterServices(kernel);
        return kernel;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Load your modules or register your services here!
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="kernel">The kernel.</param>
    private static void RegisterServices(IKernel kernel)
    {
        kernel.Unbind<IResolutionRoot>();
    }        
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for input Remo, I have the nuget version of ninject, 2.2, it does not have that scope? – Anders Nov 1 '11 at 12:02
    
If i download the named scope extension from nuget which have the InCallScope it crashes and says that IResolutionRoot is defined twice, looks like both lib's tries to registger it? Very confusing this .. :D – Anders Nov 1 '11 at 12:15
    
Which extensions do you use? Or do you register IResolutionRoot somewhere yourself? – Remo Gloor Nov 1 '11 at 13:08
    
Thanks for quick repsonse Remo, I just tried this in a seperate MVC3 project, all you need todo to reproduce the problem is to get Ninject.MVC3 and Ninject.Exctensions.NamedScope packages from nuget.. Ninject.MVC3 works but the second you load the NamedScope package you get the exception, I have not even defined any bindings in the test project all I've done is creating a StandardKernel... – Anders Nov 1 '11 at 13:24
    
With this version you need to load the extensions manually (NinjectSettings + Load method) and ensure the MVC extension is loaded first. – Remo Gloor Nov 1 '11 at 14:28

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