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Can someone be so kind and check my C++ to Java translation?

This is the first part of the c++ code I need to translate (part of the rtcmix library http://rtcmix.org/) :

static void trans(float a, float alpha, float b, int n, double *output){
       int i;
       float delta, interval = 0.0;
       delta = b - a;
       if (n <= 1) {
           *output = a;
           return;
       }
       interval = 1.0 / (n - 1.0);
       if (alpha != 0.0) {
          float denom = 1.0 / (1.0 - exp((double) alpha));
          for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
          *output++ = a + delta * (1.0 - exp((double) i * alpha * interval)) * denom;
       }
       else
       for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
           *output++ = a + delta * i * interval;
}

and this is my java translation:

    static void trans(float a, float alpha, float b, int n, double output){
           int   i;
           float delta, interval = 0;
           delta = b - a;
           if (n <= 1) {
              output = a;
              return;
           }
           interval = (float) (1.0 / (n - 1.0));
           if (alpha != 0.0) {
              float denom = (float) (1.0 / (1.0 - Math.exp((double) alpha)));
                  else
                  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
                  output++;
                  output= a +delta * i * interval;
               }
}
share|improve this question
2  
wouldn't it be nice to run your code with yourself and than if you find any issue come up with the problem? –  Umesh Awasthi Nov 1 '11 at 9:21
1  
In the C variant, output is an array, so the statement *output++ = ... means that the current position in the array is assigned the expression, then advance to the next place in the array. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 1 '11 at 9:22
    
@umesh no, because this is only the first part and Im stuck at the second one –  menemenemu Nov 1 '11 at 9:24
    
in java code return value of output parameter –  JavaDev Nov 1 '11 at 9:26

4 Answers 4

Since you have made a reasonable attempt, here is how I would write it.

static void trans(double a, double alpha, double b, double[] output) {
    double delta = b - a;
    if (output.length <= 1) {
        output[0] = a;
        return;
    }
    double interval = 1.0 / (output.length - 1);
    if (alpha != 0) {
        double denom = 1 / (1 - Math.exp(alpha));
        for (int i = 0; i < output.length; i++)
            output[i] = a + (1 - Math.exp(i * alpha * interval)) * delta * denom;
    } else {
        for (int i = 0; i < output.length; i++)
            output[i] = a + i * delta * interval;
    }
}

In your case n and output would be one parameters in Java

static void trans(float a, float alpha, float b, double[] output)

'n' is the length of the array which is output.length in java.

BTW: its a bit pointless using float of calculations with only 7 digits of accuracy and using double to store the values with 16 digits of accuracy. You might concider doing it the other way around.


If you have a method which returns a double, it should use return instead of passing via a parameter (even in C++)

Instead of assigning to output, remove it and use return value instead.

share|improve this answer
    
you mean instead of output++ return output? –  menemenemu Nov 1 '11 at 9:28
    
neither. You have a method which returns multiple values using a provided array. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 1 '11 at 10:08
    
ok.. now I'm starting to understand this method. Thanks a lot for the revision and the code. –  menemenemu Nov 1 '11 at 10:38
                static double trans(float a, float alpha, float b, int n, double output){
       int   i;
       float delta, interval = 0;
       delta = b - a;
       if (n <= 1) {
          output = a;
          return;
       }
       interval = (float) (1.0 / (n - 1.0));
       if (alpha != 0.0) {
          float denom = (float) (1.0 / (1.0 - Math.exp((double) alpha)));
              else
              for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
              output++;
              output= a +delta * i * interval;
           } return output; }

this would be better.

share|improve this answer

No, it won't work, as Java doesn't have reference variables. You will need to return output at the end of the function and change the calling code to use the return value. Start by changing the method signature to static double[] trans(....

You should also set the method access level to public or private depending on where the method is to be called from.

I see several curly brackets are also missing, so your indentation is actually misleading - fixing that would be a good first step ;)

Also note that output actually seems to be an array of size n in the original code, not a simple double.

share|improve this answer

Here is the original source again:

static void trans(float a, float alpha, float b, int n, double *output)
{
   int i;
   float delta, interval = 0.0;
   delta = b - a;
   if (n <= 1) {
       *output = a;
       return;
   }
   interval = 1.0 / (n - 1.0);
   if (alpha != 0.0) {
      float denom = 1.0 / (1.0 - exp((double) alpha));
      for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
      *output++ = a + delta * (1.0 - exp((double) i * alpha * interval)) * denom;
   }
   else
   for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
       *output++ = a + delta * i * interval;
}

The pointer parameter double *output is used to access an array. In Java you have to declare it as an array.

static void trans(float a, float alpha, float b, int n, double [] output)
{
    // Check that the array is big enough.
    // If it is too small: do nothing.
    if (output.length < n)
    {
        return;
    }

    int i;
    float delta, interval = 0;
    delta = b - a;
    if (n <= 1)
    {
        output[0] = a;

        return;
    }

    interval = (float) (1.0 / (n - 1.0));
    if (alpha != 0.0)
    {
        float denom = (float) (1.0 / (1.0 - Math.exp((double) alpha)));
        for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            output[i] = a + delta * (1.0 - Math.exp((double) i * alpha * interval)) * denom;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            output[i] = a + delta * i * interval;
        }
    }
}

EDIT

I just overlooked that the exp() function was already used in the code. Corrected Java code.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks amazing Giorgio. Thanks so much for that. I guess with find the function you mean import Java Math and then: output[i] = a + delta * (1.0 - Math.exp((double) i * alpha * interval)) * denom; –  menemenemu Nov 1 '11 at 9:53

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