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I was wondering if the partial specialization below, where I define ordered and unordered lists based on a generic List template, is the correct, efficient way of doing this.

template <typename T, bool O> class List;                                       
template <typename T> class UList: public List<T,false>{};                      
template <typename T> class OList: public List<T,true>{};

Thanks,

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hard to tell without knowing how the List is implemented. You may be better off using a policy which defines how elements are inserted. –  Nim Nov 1 '11 at 9:24
    
How would the List implementation affect the decision? –  perreal Nov 1 '11 at 9:25
    
How can we tell you if it's efficient (or correct) or not without knowing how it's implemented? –  Nim Nov 1 '11 at 9:28
    
You are right but is there a general approach to determine what sorts of classes can be efficient with this method? –  perreal Nov 1 '11 at 9:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want to reduce the genericity of the class template by reducing the number of template parameters for the classes which users would eventually use in their code. If that is so, then in C++03 and C++98, that is what you can do, i.e defining less generic classes deriving from the more generic class.

However, in C++11, you don't need to define new class template. Instead, you can create template aliases, reducing the number of template parameters at the same time as:

template <typename T> 
using UList = List<T,false>;                      

template <typename T> 
using OList = List<T,true>;

And use UList and OList as if it is a class template which takes one type argument:

UList<int> uints;
OList<float> ofloats;

In the wiki, I just learned this new way to define type/alias, which we used to do using typedef before:

The using syntax can be also used as type aliasing in C++11:

typedef void (*Type)(double);         // Old style
using OtherType = void (*)(double);   // New introduced syntax
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For something like this, I would use a policy class to define how things are inserted into a single list, e.g.

struct DefaultInsertionPolicy
{
  template <typename ContainerType, typename ValueType>
  static void insert(ContainerType& container, ValueType const& cValue)
  {
    container.insert(container.end(), cValue);
  }
};

struct SortedInsertionPolicy
{
  template <typename ContainerType, typename ValueType>
  static void insert(ContainerType& container, ValueType const& cValue)
  {
    // I'm using lower_bound here, but do what is necessary for you
    typename ContainerType::iterator ft = std::lower_bound(container.begin(), container.end(), cValue);
    container.insert(ft, cValue);
  }
};

template <typename T, typename InsertPolicy = DefaultInsertionPolicy>
class List
{
  :
  // insert function
  void insert(T const& cValue)
  {
    InsertPolicy::insert(*this, cValue); // delegate to the policy to do the insert
  }

  void insert(iterator iPos, T const& cValue)
  {
    // do the real insertion at the provided position.
  }
};

So the real types could be

typedef List<some_type> UList; // insertion order
typedef List<some_type, SortedInsertionPolicy> OList; // sorted list
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+1 for introducing policy-based design here. –  Nawaz Nov 1 '11 at 10:05

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