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I am going through jQuery tutorials, and I got a query with jQuery callback functions. The below is a very good example of jQuery callback function.

$("p").hide(1000,function(){
    alert("The paragraph is now hidden");
});

It works fine, but how can we know that to what function does this callback functionality is available?

For example, how can we apply this callback functionality to an on-click button?

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2 Answers 2

You should first know the concept of callback function. A callback function is a function which would be passed to another function, to be executed usually at a later time. (I know this definition is not 100% right. Just for educational purposes).

For example, you tell the jQuery to validate a form for you. What if it's valid? What then? What if it's invalid?

You can consider this code:

$('form').validate(validFormAction, invalidForm);

This in plain English is saying:

Please validate the form. If the form is valid, then please run validFormAction function. If it's not valid, then run the invalidForm function.

Thus, you usually know by instinct and intuitively which functions need callback. For example, animate function accepts a callback. It's so, because animate function takes a little time and you can specify another function (a callback function) to be called at its end.

As other have said, you can refer to jQuery documents too, to see which get a callback function.

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You can check the API of the functions to check whether a callback is supported. http://api.jquery.com/ You can apply the callback functionality to on click as below

$("p").click(function(){
    alert("The paragraph is clicked");
}); 
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This is not a callback function @sewdil. –  Saeed Neamati Nov 1 '11 at 10:34

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