Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT2: Thank you all for your help! EDIT: on adding @staticmethod, it works. However I am still wondering why i am getting a type error here.

I have just started OOPS and am completely new to it. I have a very basic question regarding the different ways I can call a function from a class. I have a testClass.py file with the code:

class MathsOperations:
    def __init__ (self, x, y):
        self.a = x
        self.b = y
    def testAddition (self):
        return (self.a + self.b)

    def testMultiplication (self):
        return (self.a * self.b)

I am calling this class from another file called main.py with the following code:

from testClass import MathsOperations

xyz = MathsOperations(2, 3)
print xyz.testAddition()

This works without any issues. However, I wanted to use the class in a much simpler way.

I have now put the following code in the testClass.py file. I have dropped the init function this time.

class MathsOperations:
    def testAddition (x, y):
        return x + y

    def testMultiplication (a, b):
        return a * b

calling this using;

from testClass import MathsOperations
xyz = MathsOperations()
print xyz.testAddition(2, 3)

this doesn't works. Can someone explain what is happening wrongly in case 2? How do I use this class?

The error i get is "TypeError: testAddition() takes exactly 2 arguments (3 given)"

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you have to use self as the first parameters of a method

in the second case you should use

class MathOperations:
    def testAddition (self,x, y):
        return x + y

    def testMultiplication (self,a, b):
        return a * b

and in your code you could do the following

tmp = MathOperations
print tmp.testAddition(2,3)

if you use the class without instantiating a variable first

print MathOperation.testAddtion(2,3)

it gives you an error "TypeError: unbound method"

if you want to do that you will need the @staticmethod decorator

For example:

class MathsOperations:
    @staticmethod
    def testAddition (x, y):
        return x + y

    @staticmethod
    def testMultiplication (a, b):
        return a * b

then in your code you could use

print MathsOperations.testAddition(2,3)
share|improve this answer
    
so does the @staticmethod tag automatically puts in the self parameter? –  Rishav Sharan Nov 1 '11 at 10:38
    
if you use the @staticmethod you can use the class without declaring a variable first for example, in this case if you try to use MathOperation.testAddtion(2,3) it gives you an error "TypeError: unbound method" –  Rafael Rotelok Nov 1 '11 at 10:41
1  
No, the staticmethod decorator removes the need for the self parameter. –  Daniel Roseman Nov 1 '11 at 10:41
add comment

disclaimer: this is not a just to the point answer, it's more like a piece of advice, even if the answer can be found on the references

IMHO: object oriented programming in Python sucks quite a lot.

The method dispatching is not very straightforward, you need to know about bound/unbound instance/class (and static!) methods; you can have multiple inheritance and need to deal with legacy and new style classes (yours was old style) and know how the MRO works, properties...

In brief: too complex, with lots of things happening under the hood. Let me even say, it is unpythonic, as there are many different ways to achieve the same things.

My advice: use OOP only when it's really useful. Usually this means writing classes that implement well known protocols and integrate seamlessly with the rest of the system. Do not create lots of classes just for the sake of writing object oriented code.

Take a good read to this pages:

you'll find them quite useful.

If you really want to learn OOP, I'd suggest starting with a more conventional language, like Java. It's not half as fun as Python, but it's more predictable.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I'll check out the pages. –  Rishav Sharan Nov 1 '11 at 11:03
    
you're welcome! by the way, the straight answer is that you get the error because the interpreter adds a self parameter for bound methods, so you end up with three (self plus your two supplied integers). –  fortran Nov 1 '11 at 11:10
    
ah! that explanation made sense. I am generally weary of the original python docs as they are not newbie friendly, preferring to use sites like "a byte of python". –  Rishav Sharan Nov 2 '11 at 6:35
add comment

You need to have an instance of a class to use its methods. Or if you don't need to access any of classes' variables (not static parameters) then you can define the method as static and it can be used even if the class isn't instantiated. Just add @staticmethod decorator to your methods.

class MathsOperations:
    @staticmethod
    def testAddition (x, y):
        return x + y
    @staticmethod
    def testMultiplication (a, b):
        return a * b

docs: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#staticmethod

share|improve this answer
    
I edited the question a bit. sorry about it. –  Rishav Sharan Nov 1 '11 at 10:34
    
@RishavSharan No problem, other answers already mention the missing self argument. But I would still use static methods if you don't need to work with the class parameters. –  rplnt Nov 1 '11 at 10:36
add comment

Your methods don't refer to an object (that is, self), so you should use the @staticmethod decorator:

class MathsOperations:
    @staticmethod
    def testAddition (x, y):
        return x + y

    @staticmethod
    def testMultiplication (a, b):
        return a * b
share|improve this answer
    
I was editing the question. can you please explain the typeerror there? i am giving two arguments onlts yet it says 3 arguments. –  Rishav Sharan Nov 1 '11 at 10:35
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.