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How can one get a frame in Tkinter to display in fullscreen mode? ? ? I saw this code, it's very usefull,

>>> import Tkinter
>>> root = Tkinter.Tk()
>>> root.overrideredirect(True)
>>> root.geometry("{0}x{1}+0+0".format(root.winfo_screenwidth(), root.winfo_screenheight()))

but is that a possible, when I hit Esc that automatically ''Restore down'' the window ? Probably it is a very complicated code , pls help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This creates a fullscreen window. Pressing Escape resizes the window to '200x200+0+0' by default. If you move or resize the window, Escape toggles between the current geometry and the previous geometry.

import Tkinter as tk

class FullScreenApp(object):
    def __init__(self, master, **kwargs):
        self.master=master
        pad=3
        self._geom='200x200+0+0'
        master.geometry("{0}x{1}+0+0".format(
            master.winfo_screenwidth()-pad, master.winfo_screenheight()-pad))
        master.bind('<Escape>',self.toggle_geom)            
    def toggle_geom(self,event):
        geom=self.master.winfo_geometry()
        print(geom,self._geom)
        self.master.geometry(self._geom)
        self._geom=geom

root=tk.Tk()
app=FullScreenApp(root)
root.mainloop()
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1  
note: with root.overrideredirect(True) the <Escape> doesn't call anything on my machine (Ubuntu). Without root.overrideredirect the title bar is shown. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 17 '12 at 15:23
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I think this is what you're looking for:

Tk.attributes("-fullscreen", True) #substitute `Tk` for whatever your `Tk()` object is called

You can use wm_attributes instead of attributes, too.

Then just bind the escape key and add this to the handler:

Tk.attributes("-fullscreen", False)

An answer to another question alluded to this (with wm_attributes). So, that's how I found out. But, no one just directly went out and said it was the answer for some reason. So, I figured it was worth posting.

Here's a working example (tested on Xubuntu 14.04) that uses F11 to toggle fullscreen on and off and where escape will turn it off only:

import sys;
if sys.version_info[0]==2: #Just checking your Python version to import Tkinter properly.
    from Tkinter import *;
else:
    from tkinter import *;

class Fullscreen_Window:
    def __init__(self):
        self.tk=Tk();
        self.tk.attributes('-zoomed', True); #This just maximizes it so we can see the window. It's nothing to do with fullscreen.
        self.frame=Frame(self.tk);
        self.frame.pack();
        self.state=False;
        self.tk.bind("<F11>", self.toggle_fullscreen);
        self.tk.bind("<Escape>", self.end_fullscreen);
        self.tk.mainloop();
    def toggle_fullscreen(self, event=None):
        self.state=not self.state; #Just toggling the boolean
        self.tk.attributes("-fullscreen", self.state)
        return "break";
    def end_fullscreen(self, event=None):
        self.state=False;
        self.tk.attributes("-fullscreen", False)
        return "break";

if __name__ == '__main__':
    w=Fullscreen_Window();
    try:
        w.tk.destroy();
    except:
        pass;

If you want to hide a menu, too, there are only two ways I've found to do that. One is to destroy it. The other is to make a blank menu to switch between.

self.tk.config(menu=self.blank_menu) #self.blank_menu is a Menu object

Then switch it back to your menu when you want it to show up again.

self.tk.config(menu=self.menu) #self.menu is your menu.
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