Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a select all button on this page that works on other browsers but not IE8, can anyone see the problem but looking at my source?

UPDATE:

This is my code:

<td valign="middle" align="center"><input type="checkbox" name="products-quote[]" value="<?php echo $product_option['id']; ?>" /></td>
<td valign="middle" align="center"><input type="checkbox" name="products-sample[]" value="<?php echo $product_option['id']; ?>" /></td>

<script language="JavaScript">
function toggle(source) {
  checkboxes = document.getElementsByName(source.name);
  for(var i in checkboxes)
    checkboxes[i].checked = source.checked;
}
</script>

    <tr>
    <td valign="middle" align="center"><input type="checkbox" onClick="toggle(this)" name="products-quote[]" value="0" /></td>
    <td valign="middle" align="center"><input type="checkbox" onClick="toggle(this)" name="products-sample[]" value="0" /></td>
    <td><p><b>Select all</b></p></td>
    </tr>
share|improve this question
    
when you start a bounty - you really should choose an answer.. you are going to give the bounty anyway (this is how the bounty works) so you better chosse the answer - for next time anyway –  alonisser Nov 16 '11 at 16:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have made the following mistakes:

  1. Your markup fragment, if the PHP sections are ignored, is not Valid → W3C Markup Validator
  2. You have not declared checkboxes a (local) variable with the var keyword, which is error-prone.
  3. You have not made use of the backwards-compatible live collections for forms and form controls standardized by W3C DOM Level 2 HTML.
  4. You have attempted to iterate over the properties of an object implementing the NodeList interface of W3C DOM Level 2+ Core with a for-in statement. for-in iterates over enumerable properties of an object, but the properties of such host objects do not need to be enumerable. In fact, whether their properties with numeric name (which you were after) are enumerable, and whether their properties with non-numeric name are enumerable(!), depends on the DOM implementation. That accounts for the differences between browsers. Always use a (C-style) for statement there.

Change to:

<script type="text/javascript">
  function toggleAll(source)
  {
    var checked = source.checked;
    var checkboxes = source.form.elements[source.name];

    for (var i = checkboxes.length; i--;)
    {
      var checkbox = checkboxes[i];
      if (checkbox != source)
      {
        checkbox.checked = checked;
      }
    }
  }
</script>

…

<form …>
  <table …>
<?php
  foreach (… as $product_option)
  {
    /* DRY */
    $id = $product_option['id'];
?>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" name="products-quote[]"
                 value="<?php echo $id; ?>"></td>
      <td><input type="checkbox" name="products-sample[]"
                 value="<?php echo $id; ?>"></td>
    </tr>
<?php
  }
?>
    <tr>
      <td><input type="checkbox" name="products-quote[]" value="0"
                 onclick="toggleAll(this)"></td>
      <td><input type="checkbox" name="products-sample[]" value="0"
                 onclick="toggleAll(this)"></td>
      <td>Select all</td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</form>

Untested in this case, but generally proved. I have removed the presentational attributes and elements so that you can see the solution more clearly. You should replace those with CSS-based formatting.

You might also want to consider giving the toggle checkboxes different names (so that you do not have to exclude them in the client-side iteration and server-side processing), and passing the checkbox group name as a second, string argument to toggle(…).

share|improve this answer

Why just not use document.forms['myForm'].elementscollection?

share|improve this answer

Using indexes could be the most efficient method. Because, when I tried to enumerate the object named checkboxes (like you), seems to stored number of different objects in the different browsers.
So, try to use a loop that counts until length of checkboxes and iterate it.

function toggle(source) {
  checkboxes = document.getElementsByName(source.name);
  for(var i=0;i<checkboxes.length;i++)
  checkboxes[i].checked = source.checked;
}
share|improve this answer
    
getElementsByName() is comparably inefficient and incompatible. Use the collections instead, they are there for that reason. –  PointedEars Nov 13 '11 at 3:18
    
@PointerdEars this isn't a reason for a downvote - for a typical page this is almost unnoticable. –  alonisser Nov 13 '11 at 9:05
    
@Kul-Tigin notice that you should cache the checkboxs.length before the for loop with : var i = checkboxes.length; little difference in a regular loop but makes a difference in a large one –  alonisser Nov 13 '11 at 9:06
    
@alonisser Try jsperf and go figure. –  PointedEars Nov 13 '11 at 12:22
    
@alonisser Going to set up a jsperf test case myself. However, the more important point is: it is not reliable. UA may not support it; collections date back to NN3/IE3 instead. Names can be used anywhere, not only for form controls. There could be namespaces. Talk about MSHTML's name/ID confusion. I could go on, but I think I made my point. –  PointedEars Nov 13 '11 at 12:48

more help and best practice: instead of the meta tag tou are using you can force IE to use his edge rendring engine by the following meta tags (the charset just for compatibility for the current code)

<meta charset="windows-1252" /> why are using this encoding instead of utf-8?

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible"  content="IT=edge,chrome=IE8"> 

notice that adding the chrome=IE8 isn't really needed but if you encounter a user with ie8 or less that installed chorme frame it would use chrome advanced rendering engine instead of ie8

(by the way you could also prompt them to install google frame- but that is out of topic)

from my experience this hack solves a lot of mystery IE8 problems.

a couple of other small problems: 1.you are using language=javascript - you don't need that anymore.. better using type=text/javascript (also almost not needed today, maybe relevant in the future with the rise of coffeescript etc)

2.the script is included inside the table! why? better to include in the head or even better (for performance) in the bottom of the body section with $(document).ready function around or even better in the bottom with $.ready and called from a different js file to seperate js from the rest of the html.

and now for the more important part - you are already calling jQuery in your page - let it do the heavy lifting! Jquery is already optimized for inter-browser compatibility, performance, etc, it's also simpler to use:

you could bind the toggle event without the "onclick" with something like: adding a 'selectAll' class for the checkbox buttons.

and now for the script:

    $(document).ready(function(){
        $(".selectAll").click(function(){
          var b = $(this);
          if (b.checked){
              $('form input:checkbox [name=b.name]').each(function(i){
                this.prop("checked",true);
              });
          }
         });

   });
  • I know this isn't the most optimized selector.. but this isn't his problem right now.

edit: seems I made few mistakes in the code - fixed! and works like a charm

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery is internally bloat compared to what the DOM already offers. There are no "browser differences" to work around here. –  PointedEars Nov 13 '11 at 12:20
    
you completly missed the point! he is already using jquery in his page! for different things, plugins etc. don't preach, and since he is already using jquery for other things it's much shorter to use then plain javascript. also I reject the jQuery is bloatware kind of nonsense - very low footprint, selectors optimized to the edge (and behind the scenes defaulting into browser DOM selectors if available) and yes - crossbrowser is important - and look - this is excatly the question here - A cross browser issue! –  alonisser Nov 13 '11 at 12:43
    
@alanisser Go debug jQuery and be surprised how bloaty it actually is. Go jsPerf it: Sizzle is slow, Comparison of popular selector engines vs. native approach. No, it is not at base a cross-browser issue, it is just perceived as one because of the wrong approach in the first place. You just don't use document.getElementsByName() to access form controls. DOM 101, really. –  PointedEars Nov 13 '11 at 13:36

Try 'getElementsByTagName' instead of 'getElementsByName'. getElementsByName doesn't work in IE.

share|improve this answer
    
It now doesn't work in the other browsers. –  Rob Nov 1 '11 at 13:01
1  
How did you get that idea? getElementsByName() works at least in IE/MSHTML 6.0.2800.1106. That is not the reason why it fails. See my other answer. –  PointedEars Nov 12 '11 at 21:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.