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Suppose you have a library that provides a method that accepts an object that needs to be cleaned up. E.g. by calling its Close or Dispose method. Who should be responsible? The caller or callee? Ofcourse you can choose either way as long as you document this properly. But is there consensus or best practice about this?

Here is an example:

// public method of library
public class MyObject
{
   public void Read(System.IO.Stream stream)
   {
      ...
   }
   ...
}

If the caller would be responsible, the client code should look like this:

using (FileStream file = new FileStream(...))
{
   MyObject myObject = new MyObject();
   myObject.Read(file);
}
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It depends on the use case. –  SLaks Nov 1 '11 at 13:00
1  
The caller should be responsible for disposing resources it requests. (IMHO) –  asawyer Nov 1 '11 at 13:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would say the normal "ownership" is for whoever creates the resource to start with - so the caller of your method. Aside from anything else, who's to say that the caller wants to dispose of the stream after reading? Perhaps they want to rewind it and pass it to something else.

I generally get nervous of disposing of anything I haven't explicitly created. There are exceptions to this of course - the Bitmap(Stream) constructor effectively takes ownership of the stream, and assumes that you'll dispose of the bitmap which will in turn dispose of the stream... but I'd say that's the exception rather than the rule.

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What about when a method returns a stream vs. passing in a stream? It seems like the default is that the caller is the owner even though they didn't create the stream . E.g. If I call File.Open() then I'm responsible for Disposing of the stream it returns even though I didn't create it. It seems as if caller is always the owner, regardless of whether we are passing in a stream as a param, or receiving a stream as a return, since as you pointed out it maximizes reuseability since the caller can decide when to dispose the stream. Interested in your opinion on the returns-a-stream scenario. –  AaronLS Apr 29 at 21:32
1  
@AaronLS: Yes, in most cases the caller becomes the "owner" in that situation. –  Jon Skeet Apr 30 at 5:36

In general, the caller should clean up, since you don't know whether the caller is really done with his object.

However, if your method "consumes" the object such that the caller can't use it again (eg, if it reads up a non-seekable stream), then you might want to dispose it yourself.

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