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The content that the user can enter is stripped with the following regexes:

First I remove the html entities:

\&\#(\d+|x[0-9a-f]+);?

and than I remove all characters matching:

[\<\>\"\'\`\(\)\:\%\/\\]+

Can you think of any string that can still output malicious code?

Please note that the stripped content is used outside any html tags and never in a case looking anthing like

<a href="myVariableHere">foo</a>
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Maybe I'm wrong with your intention, but XSS protection isn't about removing text, but about ensuring text is correctly encoded. With your example can you type "AT&T" or "4 < 5" correctly? Also if you strip something from user input to make sure it's not malicious in HTML content, are you sure it won't ever be used in JavaScript? PDF is displayed correctly? –  MBO Nov 1 '11 at 13:11
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Most characters don't have to be escaped inside a character class... –  Felix Kling Nov 1 '11 at 13:12
    
@MBO Well in this particular case it is for a searchbox, meaning it won't need any html, and most special characters aren't needed. I'm just curious which characters one would actually need to perform any kind of XSS attack. –  red-X Nov 1 '11 at 13:14
    
I think you should add * - /# ´ to the secund regex. SQL commands, you know. –  user898741 Nov 1 '11 at 14:28
    
Márcio: What does sql commands have to do with XSS? SQL injection is solved by prepared statements, not by restricting input. –  Erlend Nov 2 '11 at 14:32

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