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I have built a base class for my view model(s). Here is some of the code:

public class BaseViewModel<TModel> : DependencyObject, INotifyPropertyChanged, IDisposable, IBaseViewModel<TModel>, IDataErrorInfo
{
        public TModel Model { get; set; }

        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
        {
            if (this.PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                this.PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (this._disposed)
            {
                return;
            }

            if (disposing)
            {
                this.Model = default(TModel);
            }

            this._disposed = true;
        }
}

Okay, so I thought, let's add some validation to the base class, which led me to the following article: Prism IDataErrorInfo validation with DataAnnotation on ViewModel Entities. So I added the following methods / properties (IDataErrorInfo) to my base class:

string IDataErrorInfo.Error
{
    get { return null; }
}

string IDataErrorInfo.this[string columnName]
{
    get { return ValidateProperty(columnName); }
}

protected virtual string ValidateProperty(string columnName)
{
    // get cached property accessors
    var propertyGetters = GetPropertyGetterLookups(GetType());

    if (propertyGetters.ContainsKey(columnName))
    {
        // read value of given property
        var value = propertyGetters[columnName](this);

        // run validation
        var results = new List<ValidationResult>();
        var vc = new ValidationContext(this, null, null) { MemberName = columnName };
        Validator.TryValidateProperty(value, vc, results);

        // transpose results
        var errors = Array.ConvertAll(results.ToArray(), o => o.ErrorMessage);
        return string.Join(Environment.NewLine, errors);
    }
    return string.Empty;
}

private static Dictionary<string, Func<object, object>> GetPropertyGetterLookups(Type objType)
{
    var key = objType.FullName ?? "";
    if (!PropertyLookupCache.ContainsKey(key))
    {
        var o = objType.GetProperties()
        .Where(p => GetValidations(p).Length != 0)
        .ToDictionary(p => p.Name, CreatePropertyGetter);

        PropertyLookupCache[key] = o;
        return o;
    }
    return (Dictionary<string, Func<object, object>>)PropertyLookupCache[key];
}

private static Func<object, object> CreatePropertyGetter(PropertyInfo propertyInfo)
{
    var instanceParameter = System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Parameter(typeof(object), "instance");

    var expression = System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Lambda<Func<object, object>>(
        System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.ConvertChecked(
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.MakeMemberAccess(
                System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.ConvertChecked(instanceParameter, propertyInfo.DeclaringType),
                propertyInfo),
            typeof(object)),
        instanceParameter);

    var compiledExpression = expression.Compile();

    return compiledExpression;
}

private static ValidationAttribute[] GetValidations(PropertyInfo property)
{
    return (ValidationAttribute[])property.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ValidationAttribute), true);
}

Okay, this brings me to the issue. The thing is the validation works perfectly, but lets say I have a property (within my view model called: Person) with a StringLength attribute. The StringLength attribute fires as soon as the application is opened. The user didn't even have a chance to do anything. The validation fires as soon as the application is started.

public class PersonViewModel : BaseViewModel<BaseProxyWrapper<PosServiceClient>>
{
    private string _password = string.Empty;
    [StringLength(10, MinimumLength = 3, ErrorMessage = "Password must be between 3 and 10 characters long")]
    public string Password
    {
        get { return this._password; }
        set
        {
            if (this._password != value)
            {
                this._password = value;
                this.OnPropertyChanged("Password");
            }
        }
    }
}

I have noticed that this is caused by the IDataErrorInfo.this[string columnName] property, and in turn it calls the ValidateProperty method. But, I have no idea how to fix this?

share|improve this question
    
Uh, why not just skip the first time its called? –  Will Nov 1 '11 at 13:45
    
And how would I know it's the first time? I cannot hard code this in my base class. –  Richard Nov 1 '11 at 13:52
    
How would you know it is the first time? You keep track of it just like you keep track of all other state. You can probably prevent it being fired by skipping OnPropertyChanged for Password on the first time. –  Will Nov 1 '11 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There could be two issues...

Do you populate yopur Person instance by using the public properties?

e.g.

  new Person { Password = null }

This will fire the property changed notification for Password and will validate it.

Some developers also set the properties in constructors...

public class Person {
   public Person() {
      this.Password = null;
   }
} 

Recommended practise is to use private fields...

public class Person {
   public Person() {
      _password = null;
   }

   public Person(string pwd) {
      _password = pwd;
   }
} 

OR

You can create a flag in our view model base say IsLoaded. Make sure you set it to true only after your UI is loaded (probably in UI.Loaded event). In your IDataErrorInfo.this[string columnName] check if this property is true and only then validate the values. Otherwise return null.

[EDIT]

The following change did the job:

public class PersonViewModel : BaseViewModel<BaseProxyWrapper<PosServiceClient>>
{
    private string _password;
    [StringLength(10, MinimumLength = 3, ErrorMessage = "Password must be between 3 and 10 characters long")]
    public string Password
    {
        get { return this._password; }
        set
        {
            if (this._password != value)
            {
                this._password = value;
                this.OnPropertyChanged("Password");
            }
        }
    }

    public PersonViewModel(BaseProxyWrapper<PosServiceClient> model)
        : base(model)
    {
        this._username = null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, With regards to the first suggestion, I made use of the following CTOR method (yes I make use of public properties, but with encapsulation): PersonView pView = new PersonView(); PersonViewModel pViewModel = new PersonViewModel(client); pView.DataContext = pViewModel; Then the value of 'Password' is set through the binding framework: <TextBox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="3" Margin="2" Width="120" Text="{Binding Password, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=LostFocus, ValidatesOnDataErrors=True}" /> Only when the user enters a value will the set fire on the Passwordproperty. –  Richard Nov 1 '11 at 14:02
    
Secondly, I have thought about a IsLoaded property, but it felt like hard coding the base class. What would happen if the next developer forgets to handle the UI.Loaded event? –  Richard Nov 1 '11 at 14:02
    
Okay, I see where you are coming from... Will submit my answer is post ... soz, can't answer my own question ... rep is to low?! So I will post in comments! –  Richard Nov 1 '11 at 14:07
    
@Richard: Please don't try to add code to comments. If Angel's answer isn't sufficient, you can submit an edit with the additional info. Or you could just select it as correct. –  Will Nov 1 '11 at 14:16
    
Okay, will do, Tx Will –  Richard Nov 1 '11 at 14:20

Something I've done in the past is change the update source trigger to explicit, create a behavior that will update the source when the TextBox loses focus, and then attach that behavior to the TextBox.

share|improve this answer

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