Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i know that if i were to be assigning values from multiple threads to the same location in an array (or incrementing that value, etc) that i would need to use a mutex so that the value in that part of the array would remain coherent.

(example):

for(ix = 0; ix < nx; ix++)
{
  x = x_space[ix];
  for(iy = 0; iy < ny; iy++)
  {
    y = y_space[iy];

    mutex_lock[&mut];
    sum = sum + f(x,y);
    mutex_unlock[&mut];
  }
}

but is it also necessary to use a mutex around the section of code for which threads may both be getting a value from an array?

(example):

for(ix = 0; ix < nx; ix++)
{
  mutex_lock[&xmut];
  x = x_space[ix];
  mutex_unlock[&xmut];

  for(iy = 0; iy < ny; iy++)
  {
    mutex_lock[&ymut];
    y = y_space[iy];
    mutex_unlock[&ymut];

    mutex_lock[&mut];
    sum = sum + f(x,y);
    mutex_unlock[&mut];
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
If you know the array can not be resized to be smaller, and you don't care about maybe not getting the right value all the time, there is no need protect the array from reading values. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 1 '11 at 13:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. You can think of it this way: many people can look at a glass of water at the same time, but only one at a time can take a drink.

As long as you're just reading (to make a copy or whatever), it would be fine. However, if you're dealing with datatypes that don't have atomic operations (or some base datatype that isn't doing atomic operations, for reasons of memory alignment or something) and it is possible that someone else could be writing to that memory, you could look at a piece of data in a "half changed" state, where someone else is in the middle of changing it. So you might need a mutex, depending on your situation.

share|improve this answer

The answer is, it depends... If your integers are correctly aligned on most architectures, you will get atomic reads and writes and will therefore not need to lock.

If they are unaligned, however, updates to them may be non-atomic and you will need to lock. Unless you have guarantees that the writes will be atomic (i.e., one machine instruction), I would play it safe and lock.

share|improve this answer

If you are absolutely certain that the value can't change while you are reading, then you don't need a mutex. So, if there are only read operations, then mutual exclusion is unnecessary.

share|improve this answer

If your goal is to only compute the sum and store it separately, you don't need a mutex. Actually, your algorithm is very 'sequential' in nature. You can actually avoid the mutex completely by computing local sums, and aggregating at the end (farmer-worker type problem).

share|improve this answer
    
this is actually exactly what i plan to do. each thread will have a variable "lsum" which is their local sum. at the end of the nested loops, i will lock only a section where the global sum "gsum" is updated with lsum. –  Laurbert515 Nov 1 '11 at 13:45

No need to use mutex as long as you are 100% sure that the array is not resized/deleted from other thread.

share|improve this answer

As long as there will not be any writes/reallocations of the array being read, there is no need to lock them.

May I also heartily suggest less finegrained locking? This will not perform nicely, is my guess

Sample Based on OpenMP

#pragma omp parallel for reduction (+:sum)
for(ix = 0; ix < nx; ix++)
{
    x = x_space[ix];
    for(iy = 0; iy < ny; iy++)
    {
        y = y_space[iy];
        sum += f(x,y);
    }
}

// sum is automatically 'collected' from the parallel team threads
share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by less finegrained locking? what would your recommendation be? –  Laurbert515 Nov 1 '11 at 13:41
    
@Laurbert515 he means make the mutexes lock over larger sections of code, not lock and unlock over every little thing. Locking a mutex takes time too and it can slow down your program if you do it too much. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 1 '11 at 13:42
    
well, there are actually 3 different mutexes in my second example. in the first example (and the example which i believe is the best to use after your recommendations that i don't lock the reads), there is only one mutex necessary. in that case, you want to minimize the area of code which is locked, correct? –  Laurbert515 Nov 1 '11 at 13:44
    
@Laurbert515: If you have a little patience, I will write a sample of coarse-grained locking later today. Edit Have done an openMP version of the concept. OpenMP will use n threads (say, 2 on a dualcore) and schedule chunks of the loop onto the members of the team. This reduces locking and you can 'reduce' (combine) the per-thread results at the end. –  sehe Nov 1 '11 at 14:02

It mostly depends on what you have to do with that sum and what the array itself represent (and what the sum as well represents). Is it acceptable that some of the array elements are changed after you summed them up (but you're still finishing the sum)? If the answer is yes, you don't need to lock.

If the answer is no, than you have to lock the entire array for all the duration of the sum calculation, and release the lock only after the sum has played its purpose.

share|improve this answer

If you're using OpenMP 3.1, there's a nice new feature with atomic access, in this case you want

#pragma omp atomic read
some_private_var = some_shared_var[some_index];

There are two nice things about this, one is the implied flush, which is like doing

#pragma omp flush(some_shared_var[some_index])

before the read, but openmp doesn't allow flushing of dereferenced values. Although you can flush without the list, everything gets flushed so this can be expensive if in the innermost loop of some computation.

The other nice thing is of course the atomic nature of the read. Note that some_shared_var[some_index] may be of arbitrary size (perhaps it's a struct or some object in C++). If some other thread wants to write to this, which for example can happen by copying each primitive data inside the object, it cannot interrupt an atomic read.

In terms of overhead, for me anyways this is much faster than locks, and if some_shared_var[some_index] is a primitive data type the read probably happens atomically anyways, but now we get the flush.

Some other thoughts:

If it's not critical that the most recent value be read, you can take your chances without using the atomic read. This gives the potential to read from a cached value which is faster (e.g. a CPU register). Just watch out if some_shared_var[some_index] is a large object as it could then be partly written to by another thread.

I think an atomic read only has to come from somewhere in memory that is accessible to all CPUs, so it can still reside in on-chip cache (e.g. shared L3 cache), so you're not forced to read from say DRAM. I'm not 100% sure this is always true but I've confirmed it for my own computer by timing some experiments where the memory usage is below and above my CPU's on-chip cache.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.