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I have two methods: power and factorial:

public static long pow(int x, int n) {
    long p = x;
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        p *= x;
    }
    return p;
}

public static long fact(int n) {
    long s = n;
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++ ) {
        s *= i;
    }
    return s;
}

that are returning longs. When I want to use them in new method evaluating Exponential function i get wrong results comparing to Math.exp(x). My code:

public static void exp(int x, double eps) {
    int i = 1;
    double pow = 1.0;
    double fact = 1.0;
    double sum = 0.0;
    double temp;
    do {
        temp = pow/fact;
        sum += temp;
        pow = pow(x, i);
        fact = fact(i);
        i++;
    }
    while (temp > eps);
    System.out.println("Check: " + Math.exp(x));
    System.out.println("My: " + sum);
}

public static void main() {
    int x = 10;
    double eps = 0.0000000000001;

    exp(x, eps);
}

and the output for x=10 is:

Check: 22026.465794806718

My: 21798.734894914145

the larger x, the bigger "loss of precision" (not exactly, because you can't really call it precise...).

The twist is, when methods power and factorial return double then the output is correct. Can anyone explain me how to make it work?

Methods pow and fact must return long and I must use them in exp (college assignment).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you try this pow method:

public static long pow(int x, int n) {
    long p = x;
    System.out.println("Pow: "+x+","+n);
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        p *= x;
        System.out.println(p);
    }
    return p;
}

You get this output:

...
Pow: 10,20
100
1000
10000
...
...
1000000000000000
10000000000000000
100000000000000000
1000000000000000000
-8446744073709551616
7766279631452241920

The long value overflows: 10^20 is just too big to fit in a long.

Methods pow and fact must return long and I must use them in exp (college assignment).

Then there is not much you can do to fix it. You could throw an exception if eps is too small.

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Well, wow, You are right. It is kind of weird for me that long has smaller range in this case than double which behaves properly... Thank you. –  hodak Nov 1 '11 at 14:17
    
@hodak - What do you mean? long has smaller range (~ 2^63) than double (~ 2^1023). –  Ishtar Nov 1 '11 at 14:23
    
Now I'll remember, thanks ;) –  hodak Nov 1 '11 at 14:26
    
Both the functions overflow, depending on size of parameters - the pow() grows faster. You can use BigDecimal and detect the situation but youcan hardly fit the result in long. –  Rostislav Matl Nov 1 '11 at 14:49

How large is x typically? It could be integer overflow. Try changing all the int arguments in pow and fact to be long instead.

share|improve this answer
    
x isn't large, it's from 1 to, say, 20. Changing ints to longs didn't help. –  hodak Nov 1 '11 at 14:00

Long data types can't handle decimal precision that's why you're values are wrong with long. Why don't you just have the functions return the double values?

Edit: Heres what I came up with:

  public static long pow(int x, int n) 
  {
    double p = x;
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
      p *= x;
    }
    return (long)p;
  }

  public static long fact(int n) 
  {
    double s = n;
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++ ) {
      s *= i;
    }
    return (long)s;
  }


  public static void exp(int x, double eps) 
  {
    double pow = 1.0;
    double fact = 1.0;
    double sum = 0.0;
    double temp;
    for(int ii=1; ii < 100; ii++)
    {
      pow = pow(x, ii);
      fact = fact(ii);
      temp = (double)pow/(double)fact;
      temp = temp == 1 ? 0 : temp;
      sum += temp;
    }

    System.out.println("Check: " + Math.exp(x));
    System.out.println("My: " + sum);
  }

  public static void main(final String[] args)
  {
    int x = 10;
    double eps = 0.0000000000001;

    exp(x, eps);
  }

That's about the closest you're going to get without using the decimals.

Check: 22026.465794806718
My: 21946.785573087538
share|improve this answer
    
I can't, it's said in my assignment to use longs. But I wasn't able to cast them too, when I was trying to do it like this: 'pow = (double)power(x, i)' and 'fact = (double)fact(i)' –  hodak Nov 1 '11 at 13:51
    
@hodak it seems very weird that you can't use doubles in the assignment, are you sure thats correct? –  Grammin Nov 1 '11 at 14:15
    
Yes, he specifically declared that, but it is possible that he did this to force us to find the answer why that's not correct. Good teacher, this took me only about couple of hours ;) –  hodak Nov 1 '11 at 14:29

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