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Why the following code works:

char *p;

p="hello";

printf("%s\n",p);

While this one doesn't:

char *p;

strcpy(p,"hello");

printf("%s\n",p);

I know that adding p=malloc(4); on the second example would make the code work, but that is exactly my question. Why malloc is needed in the second example but not in the first?

I looked for similar questions on SO but none answer this exactly.

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Did you just edit this in the 5 minute grace period? I swear it said scanf originally not strcpy, which changes the answer somewhat. –  Flexo Nov 1 '11 at 14:11
    
Yes I figured strcpy would make it easier to understand the question, and I don't think it changes the answer. Does it? –  DanielS Nov 1 '11 at 14:14
2  
This a basic question. A bit of research should have given you the answer fairly quickly. –  Kusalananda Nov 1 '11 at 14:16
    
I looked for similar stuff in SO, but couldn't find an exact answer. –  DanielS Nov 1 '11 at 14:17
1  
@awoodland There is no function called strdup in the C language, so I wouldn't recommend it. Stick to standard functions unless you have no other choise. –  Lundin Nov 1 '11 at 14:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

p is a pointer. You need to make it point to something. In the first case,

 p = "hello";

makes p point to that string literal which is located somewhere in your program's memory at runtime.

In your second case, you didn't make p point to anything, so doing anything that looks at where p points to is invalid.

p = malloc(some_size);

makes p point to a piece of (uninitialized) memory that can hold some_size chars. If you reserved enough, you can then do things like strcpy(p, "hello") because p does point to a valid memory area, so copying into the memory pointed-to by p is ok. Note that some_size must be at least as big as what you want to copy into it, including the '\0' string terminator.

Note that doing:

p = "hello";
strcpy(p, "bye");

would be invalid because "hello" can be stored as in a read-only memory, so you can't overwrite it.

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You say "If you reserved enough memory, you can then do things like strcpy(p, "hello")". Wouldn't 4 bytes of memory for p be enough to store any string there, since p will always be just a pointer to the first char? –  DanielS Nov 1 '11 at 14:16
1  
@DanielScocco p points to the memory strcpy is copying "hello" into. It has to be at least 6 bytes big (1 for each character of hello and one for the NULL terminator). –  Seth Carnegie Nov 1 '11 at 14:17
    
It works with just 4 bytes allocated here. Maybe it's a lucky coincidence. –  DanielS Nov 1 '11 at 14:20
    
@DanielScocco: clarified a bit. You reserve memory, and store the address of that memory into p. The size of p itself depends on the architecture (4 or 8 bytes are common these days), but it is not relevant to the size of the memory area that p points to. –  Mat Nov 1 '11 at 14:22
3  
@DanielScocco - I'd say it's an un lucky coincidence when undefined behaviour slips through unnoticed. –  Flexo Nov 1 '11 at 14:24

p="hello"; assigns the address of the string literal "hello" to p, while scanf requires a place to put the scanned input, so you need to allocate some memory (static, dynamic or automatic) for it.

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But with p="hello" the string literal must be stored somewhere, so the program takes care of allocating/desalocating that automatically? Also, how to allocate static, dynamic and automatic memory for p if you want to use scanf or strcpy? I only know using malloc, which I believe is dynamic allocation right? –  DanielS Nov 1 '11 at 14:13
1  
@DanielScocco yes string literals are often stored in the binary program file itself in the static data section. Dynamic allocation is malloc, automatic memory is just on the stack, like char p[size]; where size is an integer, and static memory would just be static int whatever;. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 1 '11 at 14:15
    
Gotcha, thanks. –  DanielS Nov 1 '11 at 14:20
strcpy(p,"hello");

For string literal hello to be copied, p must point to a valid memory location which in this case isn't.

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Because the value that p has is going to be random and any attempts to copy the string there will result in a crash. By using malloc you ensure that the value of p will be ok for a copy to occur (as long as the buffer is big enough)

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"hello" is a string literal and will live in part of your output program. The memory is allocated by the compiler, at compile time, in the same place as the actual code*

That is to say that the type of "hello" will be const char[6], which is converted automatically into char *. (Using const char* instead of char* for string literals is a good habit to get into though)

In the second case p is uninitalised when you call strcpy, thus the result is undefined. p=malloc(4); is not sufficient to fix this either, the string "hello" is made of 6 characters -- 5 from the word hello itself plus '\0' to terminate the string.

* Actually on modern systems that's not quite true, it's near the same place as the code.

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I've found that in situations like this, a picture comes in handy.

Let's combine your two snippets above:

char *p = "Hello";
char *q;

strcpy(q, "goodbye");
printf("p = %s, q = %s\n", p, q);

Here's a hypothetical memory map showing the relationships between p, q, and the strings "Hello" and "goodbye":

Item        Address           0x00  0x01  0x02  0x03
----        -------           ----  ----  ----  ----
  "Hello"   0x00080000        'H'   'e'   'l'   'l'
            0x00080004        'o'   0x00  0x??  0x??
"goodbye"   0x00080008        'g'   'o'   'o'   'd'
            0x0008000C        'b'   'y'   'e'   0x00
            ...
        p   0x01010000        0x00  0x08  0x00  0x00
        q   0x01010004        0x??  0x??  0x??  0x??

"Hello" and "goodbye" are string literals, which are arrays of char (const char in C++), stored in such a way that they are active over the lifetime of the program. The literal "Hello" is stored beginning at address 0x00080000, and the literal "goodbye" is stored beginning at address 0x00080008.

p and q are pointers to char with auto extent, meaning that they only exist for the lifetime of the block in which they are declared. In this case, they are located at addresses 0x01010000 and 0x01010004, respectively (we're assuming 32-bit pointers in this example).

When you write char *p = "Hello";, the array expression "Hello" is converted to a pointer expression whose value is the location of the first element of the array, and that pointer value is copied to p, as seen in the memory map above.

When you write char *q;, the initial value of q is indeterminate1 as indicated by the 0x?? byte values. That value may or may not correspond to a writable address; odds are that it doesn't. So basically, when you write strcpy(q, "goodbye");, you're attempting to copy the contents of the "goodbye" string literal to a random location in memory. More often than not, that's going to lead to a runtime error.

If you allocate a buffer for the string, the buffer must be long enough to store the entire string plus the 0 terminator; allocating just 4 bytes isn't enough, because then your string will spill over into memory you don't "own", potentially clobbering something important (technically, the behavior is undefined, meaning anything can happen). IOW, you don't have to allocate memory for the pointer (that's already done when you declare the pointer), you have to allocate memory for the thing being pointed to.

If we change our code snippet to something like

char *p = "Hello";
char *q;

q = malloc(10);
strcpy(q, "goodbye");
printf("p = %s, q = %s\n", p, q);

then our memory map will look something like this:

Item        Address           0x00  0x01  0x02  0x03
----        -------           ----  ----  ----  ----
  "Hello"   0x00080000        'H'   'e'   'l'   'l'
            0x00080004        'o'   0x00  0x??  0x??
"goodbye"   0x00080008        'g'   'o'   'o'   'd'
            0x0008000C        'b'   'y'   'e'   0x00
            ...
        p   0x01010000        0x00  0x08  0x00  0x00
        q   0x01010004        0x40  0x00  0x00  0x00
            ...
<dynamic>   0x40000000        'g'   'o'   'o'   'd'
            0x40000004        'b'   'y'   'e'   0x00
            0x40000008        0x??  0x??

In this case, malloc sets aside 10 bytes of memory starting at 0x40000000, and copies that address to q. The call to strcpy then copies the contents of the string literal "goodbye" to that location.


1If q had been declared as static or at file scope (outside of any function) , then it would have been initialized to 0 (0x00000000).

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