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Hi i have used this code , but it outputs me 0.00159265 instead of 0. where is the problem ?

I have used taylor's expansion to calculate sin :

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
using namespace std;
double sin(double x)
{
       double value = x ;
       value -=(x*x*x)/6.0 ;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x)/120.0; 
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/5040.0 ;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/362880.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/39916800.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/6227020800.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/1307674368000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/355687428096000.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/121645100408832000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/51090942171709440000.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/25852016738884976640000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/15511210043330985984000000.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/10888869450418352160768000000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/8841761993739701954543616000000.0;
       return value;
}
int main()
{
 cout<<sin(3.14);
 getche();
 return 0;
}

Now :

I have moved my point and divergence radius between x and 3.1415 and now corrected :

double sin(double x)
{
       x=x-3.1415;
       double value = x ;
       value -=(x*x*x)/6.0 ;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x)/120.0; 
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/5040.0 ;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/362880.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/39916800.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/6227020800.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/1307674368000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/355687428096000.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/121645100408832000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/51090942171709440000.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/25852016738884976640000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/15511210043330985984000000.0;
       value -=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/10888869450418352160768000000.0;
       value +=(x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x)/8841761993739701954543616000000.0;
       return value;
}

But it is give me reverse example : pi/2 = -1 and 3*pi/2 = 1.

share|improve this question
1  
4  
...for that matter, don't ever expect sin(3.14) to be exactly 0, since 3.14 is not exactly pi. –  Jason S Nov 1 '11 at 14:18
2  
Actually you are outputting the correct result. The error you have is consistent with the difference between pi and 3.14. –  Alexandre C. Nov 1 '11 at 14:20
3  
I wish I could downvote this twice. Your second method is complete crap. The coefficients are wrong, because pi is not 3.1415. –  Alexandre C. Nov 1 '11 at 14:24
1  
And please consider that double arithmetic usually comes with a lot of imprecisions since you're mapping an infinite set of numbers to only 64 bit ;-) –  hochl Nov 1 '11 at 14:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Regarding the updated code, your radius adjustment is incorrect. You need to shift by multiples of 2π radians. You have shifted by π radians. To be more generally applicable your code should shift by multiples of 2π radians until it is in the range -π to π. This can be done with a single addition.

You also really should use an accurate value for π.

share|improve this answer
    
others are not mathematician . good for you . they just rate down. –  S.A.Parkhid Nov 1 '11 at 14:44

Why should it be exactly zero? sin(pi) is zero but that's not what you're computing -- you're computing an approximation of sin(3.14).

share|improve this answer
    
power up your def math . then rate the question –  S.A.Parkhid Nov 1 '11 at 14:46

Because sin(3.14) = 0.0015926529164868282, and not zero.

Note that pi - 3.14 ~ 0.0015926536... and sin(pi - x) ~ x, which is consistent with your result.

Pi is not 3.14.

share|improve this answer
1  
In Indiana, pi is defined as 3.2 (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Pi_Bill). –  hochl Nov 1 '11 at 14:19
1  
@hochl: almost, a bill was proposed but it never got passed. –  Jason S Nov 1 '11 at 14:20
    
It's still a cool story :^) –  hochl Nov 1 '11 at 14:21
    
@Downvoter: please explain in what respect is this answer wrong ? –  Alexandre C. Nov 1 '11 at 14:22
    
power up your def math . then rate the question –  S.A.Parkhid Nov 1 '11 at 14:45

Note that your expansion of sin(x) is poorly convergent for values of x with large magnitude. You should shift x by a multiple of such that x is in the range to π. This takes advantage of the fact that sin is periodic with period .

If you make such a shift you will be able to use fewer terms in your expansion.

I would also recommend writing your expansion as a for loop. This will make it easier for you to experiment to find out how many terms you need to gain an accurate answer.

share|improve this answer
1  
or a completely different algorithm -- taylor series usually suck except for the neighborhood of one point –  Jason S Nov 1 '11 at 14:14
1  
@Jason Presumably this is homework. Otherwise sin() is what you would do! –  David Heffernan Nov 1 '11 at 14:16
    
...and actually, you're incorrect: the Taylor series converges for all x, it's just that you need a large number of terms. –  Jason S Nov 1 '11 at 14:17
    
actually going this far an order gives good precision for sin(3.14). The figures the OP gives are in fact good. But I agree with the general principle: use another method (eg. CORDIC, or Chebyshev interpolation, or even Taylor series, but with argument reduction). –  Alexandre C. Nov 1 '11 at 14:17

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