Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am developing tests for an application. There's a method that has a params array as a parameter. I have set up the method using Moq but when I run the test, the return value of the method is null, which means it is not being mocked.

Here's a code sample:

public interface ITicketManager {
    string GetFirstTicketInQueueIfMatches(params string[] ticketsToMatch);
}

public class TicketManager : ITicketManager {
    private Queue<string> ticketQueue = new Queue<string>();

    public string GetFirstTicketInQueueIfMatches(params string[] ticketsToMatch) {
        var firstQueuedTicket = ticketQueue.Peek();
        var firstQueuedTicketMatchesAnyOfRequested = ticketsToMatch.Any(t => t == firstQueuedTicket);

        if(firstQueuedTicketMatchesAnyOfRequested)
            return firstQueuedTicket;

        return null;
    }
}

The mock code looks like this:

var mock = new Mock<ITicketManager>();

mock.Setup(m => m.GetFirstTicketInQueueIfMatches(It.IsAny<string>()))
    .Returns(p => { 
    if(p.Contains("A"))
            return "A";

    return null;
});

Why it never hits the mocked method?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You're trying to call a method taking a single string, rather than an array. Bear in mind that it's the C# compiler which handles the params part, converting calling code which just specifies individual values into a call passing in an array. As far as the method itself is concerned, it's just getting an array - and that's what you're mocking.

The compiler is actually turning your code into:

mock.Setup(m => m.GetFirstTicketInQueueIfMatches
                        (new string[] { It.IsAny<string>() }))

which isn't what you want.

You should use:

mock.Setup(m => m.GetFirstTicketInQueueIfMatches(It.IsAny<string[]>()))

If you need to verify that it only gets given a single value, you'll need to do that in the same way you would for a non-params parameter.

Basically, params only makes a difference to the C# compiler - not to moq.

share|improve this answer
    
@DiegoAC: Well you've got it conditionally returning null anyway. Have you tried making it return "Foo" instead if p doesn't contain "A"? That way you'd at least see it being invoked... –  Jon Skeet Nov 1 '11 at 14:42
    
Excellent answer Jon. Thanks. Actually I was receiving only a single string. The explanation about the compiler was very useful. –  Luis Aguilar Nov 1 '11 at 14:49

I believe the params string has to be matched by It.IsAny<string[]>() rather than It.IsAny<string>()

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.