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I'm just starting out with unit testing in C#.
I have been reading about unit testing for a long time now, and I've already been playing around with NUnit, but this is the first time that I actually try to write real tests for real code.

But my problem is:
I'm having a hard time to come up with things that I can actually test.

The project I want to test is a conversion library (to convert lists of POCOs to ADO Recordsets).

So far, I've come up with only two things to test:

  • if the recordset exists at all (not Null, not empty)
  • if the content of each field is the same (--> if RS!Foo == POCO.Foo)

So, my questions are:

  • What else can I test when my code just converts A to B?
  • Or is this project too small / too simple / not a good example to write more than a few meaningful unit tests for?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are quite a few things to test. I would also suggest thinking about and potentially verifying:

  • Private fields of POCO don't map through correctly
  • Invalid entries in the list throw exceptions correctly
  • Recordset length is correct
  • Inheritance in POCO is handled as desired (ie: base class members map through as expected)
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Add a conversion test case where you know the exact input and output. Then test that the code produces that answer exactly.

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One test case doesn't make a very good unit test. –  Jim Mischel Nov 1 '11 at 16:13
    
@JimMischel -- actually, no, one very good test case is a very good unit test. But I think you meant that one test case doesn't make a very good test suite. Agreed. But this is just to suggest one way, out of many, that he could test the code. And it will also double as a regression test, in case he makes future changes. –  Matt Fenwick Nov 1 '11 at 16:18

Try the Pex tool from Microsoft. It generates Unit tests after analyzing your code. Just a quick install of Visual studio plugin. Then Right click the class/method you want to test and in the context menu get Pex to generate all the possible code paths for you.

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