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I have writen a static library that consists of a major namespace. How do I control access to classes within that namespace? For example, if I wanted all classes inside to be 'private' and only a few interface functions to be accessable. Any Ideas? Can I do something like this:

namespace{
    public:
        void startSomeProcess();
    private:
    // global variables
        class Priv{};
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are no access specifiers for a Namespace, You cannot do that.

Access specifiers are only for a class/structure.

If you do not want to expose certain classes do not put them in the header file which you expose to the users,If users cant see a class exists, they won't be using it.

"NmspPublic.h" to share with others

namespace Nmsp {
    void startSomeProcess();
}

"NmspPrivate.h" to keep internally

#inlcude "NmspPublic.h"
namespace Nmsp {
        class Priv{};
}
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So can you still declare those classes inside the namespace, like in the .cpp file: namespace Nmsp{ /* private classes */ }; //class declarations –  user965369 Nov 1 '11 at 16:17
    
@user965369: My company does this all the time, by having two sets of headers, a private one that includes a public one. Added examples –  Mooing Duck Nov 1 '11 at 16:24
    
@Mooing Duck that's great mate thanks. –  user965369 Nov 1 '11 at 16:33
    
@user965369;The important point to know here is using namespace Nmsp{} in different files just extends the same namespace.It means you can have the same namespace spread across different files and hence you can easily separate out the interface classes(which you want to expose to users though header) and private classes(which you do not want to expose to users). –  Alok Save Nov 1 '11 at 16:44
    
@Als does this mean that if users can extend Nmps via namespace Nmps{} beyond the interface files, they will be able to access these private classes in Nmps? –  user965369 Nov 1 '11 at 16:54

Moving the "private" prototypes out of the header file and declaring the functions as static should do it.

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You cannot place access specifiers in a namespace. What you could do is create a class in the namespace and place static methods inside the class.

class AccessControl {
public:
    static void startSomeProcess();

private:
    class Priv {};
};

And use friend specifiers in Priv to control access.

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I just think it looks and feels pretty ugly to decalre a class just for access control, besides surely people can just extend and override? - Als solution looks pretty solid. –  user965369 Nov 1 '11 at 16:22
1  
I agree that it is not the most beautiful solution. And Al's solution works IF you can partition the header files. That's by far the best way to go. But if you cannot partition the headers between public and private, then you need some way to enforce the policy in the public header. You can use the techniques in Alexandrescu's Modern C++ Design to prevent extend and override. –  drdwilcox Nov 1 '11 at 16:56

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