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How do you get all the classes in a namespace through reflection in C#?

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can you edit your question... the subtext question is a more communicative than the 'Namespace in C#' –  Gishu Sep 17 '08 at 3:42
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8 Answers

Following code prints names of classes in specified ns defined in current assembly.
As other guys pointed, namespace can be scattered between different modules, so you need to get a list of assemblies first.

string @namespace = "...";

var q = from t in Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes()
        where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == @namespace
        select t;
q.ToList().ForEach(t => Console.WriteLine(t.Name));
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14  
I don't know. I think it rocks. –  Ryan Farley Sep 17 '08 at 3:47
17  
Isn't doing something like this via a LINQ query just as valid as any other reasonable way to do it? I don't have a problem with it and I don't think it is showing off at all. I actually think it makes it nice, compact and easily readable. –  Ryan Farley Sep 17 '08 at 4:00
5  
Hrm... I think it's elegant, and it's an alternative to the 'traditional' answers. I suspect that those who are against the LINQ solution are probably not using LINQ, and thus it seems unnecessary or complicated. Anyway, I like the response as an alternative implementation. Choices are always good –  Travis Sep 17 '08 at 4:22
10  
TheXenocide you completely misunderstand purpose of code snippets like this. I give away some code only to show a way how it can be implemented. It's not a "best" or "backward compatible" solution. It's one of the billions way to implement this stuff. –  aku Sep 20 '08 at 5:03
4  
TheXenocide, I'm not going to discuss anything. You missed the point - code sample like this doesn't pretend to be be BEST solution. It's a quick sample no more no less. Just treat it as one of many possible implementations. –  aku Oct 4 '08 at 3:43
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As FlySwat says, you can have the same namespace spanning in multiple assemblies. You will have to load all those assemblies if they are not already loaded. So for a complete answer:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
                       .SelectMany(t => t.GetTypes())
                       .Where(t => t.IsClass && t.Namespace == @namespace)

This should work unless you want classes of other domains. To get a list of all domains, follow this link.

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Here's a fix for LoaderException errors you're likely to find if one of the types sublasses a type in another assembly:

// Setup event handler to resolve assemblies
AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ReflectionOnlyAssemblyResolve += new ResolveEventHandler(CurrentDomain_ReflectionOnlyAssemblyResolve);

Assembly a = System.Reflection.Assembly.ReflectionOnlyLoadFrom(filename);
a.GetTypes();
// process types here

// method later in the class:
static Assembly CurrentDomain_ReflectionOnlyAssemblyResolve(object sender, ResolveEventArgs args)
{
    return System.Reflection.Assembly.ReflectionOnlyLoad(args.Name);
}

That should help with loading types defined in other assemblies.

Hope that helps!

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using System.Reflection;
using System.Collections.Generic;
//...

static List<string> GetClasses(string nameSpace)
{
    Assembly asm = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();

    List<string> namespacelist = new List<string>();
    List<string> classlist = new List<string>();

    foreach (Type type in asm.GetTypes())
    {
        if (type.Namespace == nameSpace)
            namespacelist.Add(type.Name);
    }

    foreach (string classname in namespacelist)
        classlist.Add(classname);

    return classlist;
}
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1  
"namespace" - reserved keyword, you should add @ prefix to make this code compile –  aku Sep 17 '08 at 3:52
4  
I'm not trying to be mean, but there is an entirely unnecessary list and iteration through all of the found items in this code; the "classlist" variable and foreach through "namespacelist" provide no functionality different from returning "namespacelist" –  TheXenocide Sep 19 '08 at 15:23
3  
@TheXenocide the purpose of a code sample is not always meant to show the "best" way to write code, but to clearly convey how something is done. –  Ryan Farley Sep 19 '08 at 15:46
2  
I was just pointing it out for the sake of education; it's our responsibility to make the material people learn from the best example we can rather than risking a bad example that negatively influences understanding. I'm not saying this in particular is detrimental, but I disagree with the sentiment –  TheXenocide Sep 19 '08 at 17:29
3  
I vote an answer down if it is not helpful to the question that was asked. The hint you see as you hover over the up/down vote button says "This was helpful". The decision to up/down vote an answer, for me, is whether or not it was helpful in answering the question asked. –  Ryan Farley Oct 3 '08 at 16:53
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Just like @aku answer, but using extension methods:

string @namespace = "...";

var types = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes()
    .Where(t => t.IsClass && t.Namespace == @namespace)
    .ToList();

types.ForEach(t => Console.WriteLine(t.Name));
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Namespaces are actually rather passive in the design of the runtime and serve primarily as organizational tools. The Full Name of a type in .NET consists of the Namespace and Class/Enum/Etc. combined. If you only wish to go through a specific assembly, you would simply loop through the types returned by assembly.GetExportedTypes() checking the value of type.Namespace. If you were trying to go through all assemblies loaded in the current AppDomain it would involve using AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()

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//a simple combined code snippet 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Reflection;

namespace MustHaveAttributes
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main ( string[] args )
    {
      Console.WriteLine ( " START " );

      // what is in the assembly
      Assembly a = Assembly.Load ( "MustHaveAttributes" );
      Type[] types = a.GetTypes ();
      foreach (Type t in types)
      {

        Console.WriteLine ( "Type is {0}", t );
      }
      Console.WriteLine (
         "{0} types found", types.Length );

      #region Linq
      //#region Action


      //string @namespace = "MustHaveAttributes";

      //var q = from t in Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly ().GetTypes ()
      //        where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == @namespace
      //        select t;
      //q.ToList ().ForEach ( t => Console.WriteLine ( t.Name ) );


      //#endregion Action  
      #endregion

      Console.ReadLine ();
      Console.WriteLine ( " HIT A KEY TO EXIT " );
      Console.WriteLine ( " END " );
    }
  } //eof Program


  class ClassOne
  {

  } //eof class 

  class ClassTwo
  {

  } //eof class


  [System.AttributeUsage ( System.AttributeTargets.Class |
    System.AttributeTargets.Struct, AllowMultiple = true )]
  public class AttributeClass : System.Attribute
  {

    public string MustHaveDescription { get; set; }
    public string MusHaveVersion { get; set; }


    public AttributeClass ( string mustHaveDescription, string mustHaveVersion )
    {
      MustHaveDescription = mustHaveDescription;
      MusHaveVersion = mustHaveVersion;
    }

  } //eof class 

} //eof namespace
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You won't be able to get all types in a namespace, because a namespace can bridge multiple assemblies, but you can get all classes in an assembly and check to see if they belong to that namespace.

Assembly.GetTypes() works on the local assembly, or you can load an assembly first then call GetTypes() on it.

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+1 for the correct answer. AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies can be helpful. –  nawfal May 12 '13 at 4:20
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