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In the following example, one thread is sending "messages" via a ByteBuffer which is the consumer is taking. The best performance is very good but its not consistent.

public class Main {
    public static void main(String... args) throws IOException {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            doTest();
    }

    public static void doTest() {
        final ByteBuffer writeBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(64 * 1024);
        final ByteBuffer readBuffer = writeBuffer.slice();
        final AtomicInteger readCount = new PaddedAtomicInteger();
        final AtomicInteger writeCount = new PaddedAtomicInteger();

        for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
            performTiming(writeBuffer, readBuffer, readCount, writeCount);
        System.out.println();
    }

    private static void performTiming(ByteBuffer writeBuffer, final ByteBuffer readBuffer, final AtomicInteger readCount, final AtomicInteger writeCount) {
        writeBuffer.clear();
        readBuffer.clear();
        readCount.set(0);
        writeCount.set(0);

        Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                byte[] bytes = new byte[128];
                while (!Thread.interrupted()) {
                    int rc = readCount.get(), toRead;
                    while ((toRead = writeCount.get() - rc) <= 0) ;
                    for (int i = 0; i < toRead; i++) {
                        byte len = readBuffer.get();
                        if (len == -1) {
                            // rewind.
                            readBuffer.clear();
//                            rc++;
                        } else {
                            int num = readBuffer.getInt();
                            if (num != rc)
                                throw new AssertionError("Expected " + rc + " but got " + num) ;
                            rc++;
                            readBuffer.get(bytes, 0, len - 4);
                        }
                    }
                    readCount.lazySet(rc);
                }
            }
        });
        t.setDaemon(true);
        t.start();
        Thread.yield();
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        int runs = 30 * 1000 * 1000;
        int len = 32;
        byte[] bytes = new byte[len - 4];
        int wc = writeCount.get();
        for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++) {
            if (writeBuffer.remaining() < len + 1) {
                // reader has to catch up.
                while (wc - readCount.get() > 0) ;
                // rewind.
                writeBuffer.put((byte) -1);
                writeBuffer.clear();
            }
            writeBuffer.put((byte) len);
            writeBuffer.putInt(i);
            writeBuffer.put(bytes);
            writeCount.lazySet(++wc);
        }
        // reader has to catch up.
        while (wc - readCount.get() > 0) ;
        t.interrupt();
        t.stop();
        long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
        System.out.printf("Message rate was %.1f M/s offsets %d %d %d%n", runs * 1e3 / time
                , addressOf(readBuffer) - addressOf(writeBuffer)
                , addressOf(readCount) - addressOf(writeBuffer)
                , addressOf(writeCount) - addressOf(writeBuffer)
        );
    }

    // assumes -XX:+UseCompressedOops.
    public static long addressOf(Object... o) {
        long offset = UNSAFE.arrayBaseOffset(o.getClass());
        return UNSAFE.getInt(o, offset) * 8L;
    }

    public static final Unsafe UNSAFE = getUnsafe();
    public static Unsafe getUnsafe() {
        try {
            Field field = Unsafe.class.getDeclaredField("theUnsafe");
            field.setAccessible(true);
            return (Unsafe) field.get(null);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new AssertionError(e);
        }
    }

    private static class PaddedAtomicInteger extends AtomicInteger {
        public long p2, p3, p4, p5, p6, p7;

        public long sum() {
//            return 0;
            return p2 + p3 + p4 + p5 + p6 + p7;
        }
    }
}

prints the timings for the same block of data. The numbers at the end are the relative addresses of the objects which show they are layed out in cache the same each time. Running longer tests of 10 shows that a given combination produces the same performance repeatedly.

Message rate was 63.2 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 80.4 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 80.0 M/s offsets 136 200 264

Message rate was 81.9 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 82.2 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 82.5 M/s offsets 136 200 264

Message rate was 79.1 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 82.4 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 82.4 M/s offsets 136 200 264

Message rate was 34.7 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 39.1 M/s offsets 136 200 264
Message rate was 39.0 M/s offsets 136 200 264

Each set of buffers and counter are tested three times and those buffers appear to give similar results. SO I believe there is something about the way these buffers are layed out in memory I am not seeing.

Is there anything which might give the higher performance more often? It looks like a cache collision but I can't see where this could be happening.

BTW: M/s is millions of messages per second and is more than anyone is likely to need, but it would be good to understand how to make it consistently fast.


EDIT: Using synchronized with wait and notify makes the result much more consistent. But not faster.

Message rate was 6.9 M/s
Message rate was 7.8 M/s
Message rate was 7.9 M/s
Message rate was 6.7 M/s
Message rate was 7.5 M/s
Message rate was 7.7 M/s
Message rate was 7.3 M/s
Message rate was 7.9 M/s
Message rate was 6.4 M/s
Message rate was 7.8 M/s

EDIT: By using task set, I can make the performance consistent if I lock the two threads to change the same core.

Message rate was 35.1 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 34.0 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 35.4 M/s offsets 136 200 216

Message rate was 35.6 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 37.0 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 37.2 M/s offsets 136 200 216

Message rate was 37.1 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 35.0 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 37.1 M/s offsets 136 200 216

If I use any two logical threads on different cores, I get the inconsistent behaviour

Message rate was 60.2 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 68.7 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 55.3 M/s offsets 136 200 216

Message rate was 39.2 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 39.1 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 37.5 M/s offsets 136 200 216

Message rate was 75.3 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 73.8 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 66.8 M/s offsets 136 200 216

EDIT: It appears that triggering a GC will shift the behaviour. These show repeated test on the same buffer+counters with a manually trigger GC halfway.

faster after GC

Message rate was 27.4 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 27.8 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 29.6 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 27.7 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 29.6 M/s offsets 136 200 216
[GC 14312K->1518K(244544K), 0.0003050 secs]
[Full GC 1518K->1328K(244544K), 0.0068270 secs]
Message rate was 34.7 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 54.5 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 54.1 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 51.9 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 57.2 M/s offsets 64 128 144

and slower

Message rate was 61.1 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 61.8 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 136 200 216
Message rate was 61.1 M/s offsets 136 200 216
[GC 35740K->1440K(244544K), 0.0018170 secs]
[Full GC 1440K->1302K(244544K), 0.0071290 secs]
Message rate was 53.9 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 54.3 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 50.8 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 56.6 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 56.0 M/s offsets 64 128 144
Message rate was 53.6 M/s offsets 64 128 144

EDIT: Using @BegemoT's library to print the core id used I get the following on a 3.8 GHz i7 (home PC)

Note: the offsets are incorrect by a factor of 8. As the heap size was small, the JVM doesn't multiply the reference by 8 like it does with a heap which is larger (but less than 32 GB).

writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 54.4 M/s offsets 3392 3904 4416
writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#6]
Message rate was 54.2 M/s offsets 3392 3904 4416
writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 60.7 M/s offsets 3392 3904 4416

writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 25.5 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 25.9 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 26.0 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 61.0 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 61.8 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
writer.currentCore() -> Core[#0]
reader.currentCore() -> Core[#5]
Message rate was 60.7 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

You can see that the same logical threads are being used, but the performance varies, between runs, but not within a run (within a run the same objects are used)


I have found the problem. It was a memory layout issue but I could see a simple way to resolve it. ByteBuffer cannot be extended so you can't add padding so I create an object I discard.

    final ByteBuffer writeBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(64 * 1024);
    final ByteBuffer readBuffer = writeBuffer.slice();
    new PaddedAtomicInteger();
    final AtomicInteger readCount = new PaddedAtomicInteger();
    final AtomicInteger writeCount = new PaddedAtomicInteger();

Without this extra padding (of the object which is not used), the results look like this on a 3.8 GHz i7.

Message rate was 38.5 M/s offsets 3392 3904 4416
Message rate was 54.7 M/s offsets 3392 3904 4416
Message rate was 59.4 M/s offsets 3392 3904 4416

Message rate was 54.3 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 56.3 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 56.6 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 28.0 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 28.1 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 28.0 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 17.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 17.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 17.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 54.5 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 54.2 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 55.1 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 25.5 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 25.6 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 25.6 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 56.6 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 54.7 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 54.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 57.0 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 55.9 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 56.3 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 51.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 56.6 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 56.1 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

Message rate was 46.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 46.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112
Message rate was 47.4 M/s offsets 1088 1600 2112

with the discarded padded object.

Message rate was 54.3 M/s offsets 3392 4416 4928
Message rate was 53.1 M/s offsets 3392 4416 4928
Message rate was 59.2 M/s offsets 3392 4416 4928

Message rate was 58.8 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 58.9 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 59.3 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 59.4 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 59.0 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 59.8 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 59.8 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 59.8 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 59.2 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.9 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.6 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 59.6 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.3 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 60.9 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.5 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 60.7 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 61.6 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.8 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Message rate was 60.3 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 60.7 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624
Message rate was 58.3 M/s offsets 1088 2112 2624

Unfortunately there is always the risk that after a GC, the objects will not be laid out optimally. The only way to resolve this may be to add padding to the original class. :(

share|improve this question
    
Have you taken a peek at what the garbage collector is up to? –  Jeff Foster Nov 1 '11 at 16:37
    
-verbosegc doesn't print anything. There is very little garbage produced. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 1 '11 at 16:41
    
This PaddedAtomicInteger idea is new to me. I assume the goal is to bloat the AtomicInteger so that different instances do not end up in the same cache line. Has anyone written anything about this idea that i could read? –  Tom Anderson Nov 2 '11 at 8:26
    
@TomAnderson, You can try it with this test, removing the padded fields and method. It a bit hard to see due to the inconsistency, but you get lower worst case and best timings over longer runs. You can also see the offsets (the last two numbers) become 200 216 instead of 200 264 –  Peter Lawrey Nov 2 '11 at 8:39
1  
@jtahlborn, the CPU instruction(s) that operate on java heap and native/unmanaged C memory is the same. If lazySet (or just volatile write) guarantees store-store barrier semantics (i.e. everything must be written by the time the instruction finishes), it doesn't matter where the memory was/is. actually i am not sure which reply you believe is not sensible, the one to Peter's or the one to yourself? –  bestsss Nov 7 '11 at 11:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted
+500

I'm not an expert in the area of processor caches but I suspect your issue is essentially a cache issue or some other memory layout problem. Repeated allocation of the buffers and counters without cleaning up the old objects may be causing you to periodically get a very bad cache layout, which may lead to your inconsistent performance.

Using your code and making a few mods I have been able to make the performance consistent (my test machine is Intel Core2 Quad CPU Q6600 2.4GHz w/ Win7x64 - so not quite the same but hopefully close enough to have relevant results). I've done this in two different ways both of which have roughly the same effect.

First, move creation of the buffers and counters outside of the doTest method so that they are created only once and then reused for each pass of the test. Now you get the one allocation, it sits nicely in the cache and performance is consistent.

Another way to get the same reuse but with "different" buffers/counters was to insert a gc after the performTiming loop:

for ( int i = 0; i < 3; i++ )
    performTiming ( writeBuffer, readBuffer, readCount, writeCount );
System.out.println ();
System.gc ();

Here the result is more or less the same - the gc lets the buffers/counters be reclaimed and the next allocation ends up reusing the same memory (at least on my test system) and you end up in cache with consistent performance (I also added printing of the actual addresses to verify reuse of the same locations). My guess is that without the clean up leading to reuse you eventually end up with a buffer allocated that doesn't fit into the cache and your performance suffers as it is swapped in. I suspect that you could do some strange things with order of allocation (like you can make the performance worse on my machine by moving the counter allocation in front of the buffers) or creating some dead space around each run to "purge" the cache if you didn't want to eliminate the buffers from a prior loop.

Finally, as I said, processor cache and the fun of memory layouts aren't my area of expertise so if the explanations are misleading or wrong - sorry about that.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with creating the buffers once is that you do get consistently good or bad performance. You won't know which. I would like to get consistently close to the best performance. Even if you start with good performance a GC can move the objects can change the performance characteristics. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 7 '11 at 8:16
    
I like the idea of padding the buffer which may be also useful. It doesn't explain the situation where a GC changes the performance as the buffers are in direct memory (only the portion in the heap is changed) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 7 '11 at 8:18

you are busy waiting. that is always a bad idea in user code.

reader:

                while ((toRead = writeCount.get() - rc) <= 0) ;

writer:

            while (wc - readCount.get() > 0) ;
share|improve this answer
3  
+1. That's what wait(), notify() and notifyAll() are for. –  z5h Nov 1 '11 at 17:08
6  
The reason for busy waiting is to avoid giving up the core and having it context switched. This can increase latency dramatically. Using wait/notify was marginally slower, but not as much slower as I expected. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 2 '11 at 7:49
3  
Using wait/notify makes performance more consistent but at least 4x slower. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 3 '11 at 16:57
1  
@PeterLawrey - did you try the Lock/Condition constructs? in some versions of the jvm, they perform better. –  jtahlborn Nov 3 '11 at 18:45
2  
@z5h, both wait/notify and Lock/Conditions are all terrible ideas for this code (the more more terrible). Park/Unpark is the way to go after some busy spin, possible Thread.yeild and back off. –  bestsss Nov 6 '11 at 22:11

As a general approach to performance analysis:

  • Try jconsole. Start your app, and while it's running type jconsole in separate terminal window. This will bring up the Java Console GUI, which allows you to connect to a running JVM, and see performance metrics, memory usage, Thread count and status, etc.
  • Basically you're going to have to figure out the correlation between the speed fluxuations and what you see the JVM doing. It could also be helpful to bring up your task manager and see if your system is actually just busy doing other stuff (paging to the disk due to low memory, busy with a heavy background task, etc.) and put it side-by-side with the jconsole window.
  • One other alternative is launching the JVM with the -Xprof option which outputs relative time spent in various methods on a per-thread basis. Ex. java -Xprof [your class file]
  • Finally, there is also JProfiler, but it's a commercial tool, if that matters to you.
share|improve this answer
    
The machine is fairly high spec, 4.6 GHz i7 with 16 GB of memory and nothing else running. The speed reported doesn't appear to change with longer runs which suggest some random cache or thread layout factor is involved. (i.e. you would expect most random factors to average out with longer and longer runs) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 2 '11 at 8:07
3  
I wouldn't use a profiler for this sort of test, it will kill performance. Besides there is barely any code to profile. –  Matt Nov 2 '11 at 9:39
    
It's just a general approach, and it doesn't really matter that performance is "killed" by the profiler - the idea is to find out where your code is spending your time. There will, of course, be overhead for this observation, but it doesn't make the results invalid. –  jefflunt Nov 2 '11 at 13:41
1  
It can make the results invalid because the behaviour of an application under load when it is artificially slowed down by jvmti can be quite different from the behaviour when it is not under such duress. I don't think a profiler is the right tool for this class of performance problem. –  Matt Nov 2 '11 at 17:07
1  
there are 2 ways profilers work: Sampling and code injection. Sampling sucks because it relies on the safe points to gather any stack trace, i.e. it depends there JVM will put the safe points and generally it will show nothing useful. Code injection sucks even more b/c it alters the way the JVM compiles the code and kills a lot of optimizations. To put it simply profiling low-level stuff doesn't work. –  bestsss Nov 7 '11 at 14:14

EDIT: It appears that triggering a GC will shift the behaviour. These show repeated test on the same buffer+counters with a manually trigger GC halfway.

GC means reaching a safepoint which means all threads have stopped executing bytecode & the GC threads have work to do. This can have various side effects. For example, in the absence of any explicit cpu affinity, you may restart execution on a different core or cache lines may have been refreshed. Can you track which cores your threads are running on?

What CPUs are these? Have you done anything about power management to prevent them dropping down into lower p and/or c states? Perhaps 1 thread is being scheduled onto a core that was in a different p state hence shows a different performance profile.

EDIT

I tried running your test on a workstation running x64 linux with 2 slightly old quadcore xeons (E5504), it's generally consistent within a run (~17-18M/s) with occasion runs much slower which appears to generally correspond with thread migrations. I didn't plot this rigorously. Therefore it appears your problem might be CPU architecture specific. You mention you're running an i7 at 4.6GHz, is that a typo? I thought the i7 topped out at 3.5GHz with a 3.9Ghz turbo mode (with an earlier version 3.3GHz to 3.6GHz turbo). Either way are you sure you're not seeing an artifact of turbo mode kicking in then dropping out? You could try repeating the test with turbo disabled to be sure.

A couple of other points

  • the padding values are all 0, are you sure there isn't some special treatment being meted out to uninitialised values? you could consider using the LogCompilation option to understand how the JIT is treating that method
  • Intel VTune is free for 30 day evaluation, if this is a cache line problem then you could use that to determine what the problem is on your host
share|improve this answer
    
In each test, the "background" thread is a new one. However, the results are still much the same (unless a GC is called which moves the objects about) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 2 '11 at 17:40
    
The i7 is over clocked, with a massive heat sink larger than the power supply. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 9 '11 at 18:58

How do you actually pin your threads to cores? taskset is not the best way to pin thread to cores, since it just pin process to cores -- and all its threads will share this cores. Recall, java have many internal threads for it's own needs, so all them will contend on cores you'll bind them to.

To have more consistent results you can use JNA to call sched_setaffinity() from only threads you need to. It will pin only your benchmarking threads to exact cores, while other java threads will spread on other free cores, having less influence on your code behavior.

By the way, I've have similar issues with unstable performance while benchmarking highly optimized concurrent code. It seems, like where are too many things which can influence performance drastically while it is close to hardware limits. You should tune your OS somehow, to give your code the possibility to make it best, or just use many experiments and use math to have averages and confidence intervals.

share|improve this answer
    
Part of the reason I don't believe thread affinity is the main problem is that if I use the same buffers/objects with different threads, I get the same results, until I trigger a GC. After a GC, each test repeatedly gets the new timings. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 7 '11 at 13:33
2  
Well, if GC is the main issue, then it seems what reason is compaction -- since GC may do memory defragmentation, moving object here and there, it can be what new objects layout will be inadequate one -- CPU cache is not as simple as just "cache lines" and "false sharing" -- there is also such thing as cache associativity. For example, readCount and writeCount, although padded, may be layed on such memory regions, which mapped to the same cache-line by limited associativity cache.... –  BegemoT Nov 7 '11 at 14:36
3  
Also, you can look at Cliff Click's post azulsystems.com/blog/cliff/… (scroll down until he talks about Disruptor). Disruptor ring buffer is quite similar to your code (shared buffer + membars on volatile read/writes to force data transfer between threads -- they even use lazySet for volatile write optimization), and Cliff observes same 3x perfomance instability issues as you have, so his description can help you understand the problem. But he mainly claims thread affinity as the reason. –  BegemoT Nov 8 '11 at 9:41
1  
The 3x performance difference cliff quotes is comparing two thread of the same socket or on different sockets. In the case above, my machine only has one socket (but our servers have multiple sockets and taskset might be the answer to limit the process to one socket) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '11 at 10:07
    
Also, haven't you try to increase padding -- to 128 bytes, for example? –  BegemoT Nov 8 '11 at 13:14

There would certainly be some inconsistency brought in when a full GC runs, but that's not so often. Try modifying the stack size (Xss) to say 32M and see if that helps. Also, try clearing the 2 buffers at the end of each test to make it even easier for the GC to know that the contents can be collected. Interestingly, you have used thread.stop() which is deprecated and absolutely not recommended. I would suggest changing that too.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure hot clearing a direct byte buffer would help the GC. clear() actually sets just two fields. The stop() is to make absolutely sure the thread has stopped. Do you suspect it a performance problem? –  Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '11 at 8:22
    
not with stop, it can only lead to corruption of state and hence is not recommended. I have seen clear() help in the past and hence the suggestion. My gut feel is that tweaking the Xss will help you. –  aishwarya Nov 8 '11 at 8:59
1  
It will lead to corrupted state if throwing a ThreadError at any point could leave a synchronized or locked object in an inconsistent state. The code does have this issue, because it is trivial and all state is reset after the test. (99% of real programs would have this problem) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '11 at 9:35

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