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I have a HashMap called examList which stored exam grades of each course a student took. The key of this hashmap is courseID, and the value is an array list gradeList which contains all grades a student got in a course. The problem is as follows:

// Add a new course exam listing
// where each course exam can be done a max 5 times
protected void addExam(String courseID, int grade) {
    ArrayList<Integer> gradeList;
    // First check if course is in the list, if not add it
    if ( !examList.containsKey(courseID) ) {
        gradeList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        examList.put(courseID, gradeList);
        examList.get(gradeList.add(grade));
    // If course is already on the list, check if max number of attempts has been reached, if not add new grade
    } else if ( examList.containsKey(courseID)) {
        if ( gradeList.size() <= 5 )            // THIS IS WHERE ERROR OCCURES
            examList.get(gradeList.add(grade)); // HERE ALSO
        else
            System.out.println("Maxim number of attempts has been reached.");
    }
}

As you can see I first define gradeList, but I do not yet initialize it. Under IF I check if student has already done this exam before. If he hasn't then new entry is created for hashmap, and gradeList is finally initialized. Under ELSE (where, it is considered that there is an element with gradeList already initialized) I just add new grade. However, that seems to be the problem. I can't compile it because program presumes that gradeList is not yet initialized here. So, how can I fix this? Or can I avoid it (since logically, gradeList will always be initialized under ELSE) through error handling, of which I know little about?

share|improve this question
    
You only initialize gradeList in the if-part. Everywhere else, the list isn't initialized and you will get an error. From you code snippet it isn't clear that gradeList is initialized anywhere else in your code. So when you say you assume gradeList is initialized in the else-if part of your code, how is this done? – Pieter Nov 1 '11 at 16:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted
ArrayList<Integer> gradeList = null;

In your case, it's better to do something as follows:

List<Integer> gradeList = examList.get(courseID);
if(gradeList == null) {
    gradeList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    //... do something
} else {
    //... do something else
}
share|improve this answer

just initialize gradeList when you create the variable.

ArrayList<Integer> gradeList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

or set it to null

ArrayList<Integer> gradeList = null;
share|improve this answer
    
ok, but wouldn't that replace the list each time this method is called? I mean if course with gradeList already exists and this method is called wouldn't gradeList be newly created and empty, and examList.get(gradeList.add(grade)) would add new grade to this new list instead of the old? – vedran Nov 1 '11 at 16:54
    
If the list already exists prior to the method call, then you should pass the list as an argument in the method. – Reid Mac Nov 1 '11 at 16:58

Assign null in its declaration:

ArrayList<Integer> gradeList = null;
share|improve this answer

When you declare the ArrayList, simply write gradeList = null. Or even better, to avoid NullPointerExceptions, initialize it on the spot, like this: ArrayList<Integer> gradeList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

share|improve this answer
    
ok, but wouldn't that replace the list each time this method is called? I mean if course with gradeList already exists and this method is called wouldn't gradeList be newly created and empty, and examList.get(gradeList.add(grade)) would add new grade to this new list instead of the old – vedran Nov 1 '11 at 16:57
1  
In your method, gradeList never exists at the beginning of the method, since you're declaring it as a local variable, it gets created every time. If you wanted the list to "survive" between different method invocations (for the same object instance), you should declare gradeList as an attribute, not a local variable – Óscar López Nov 1 '11 at 17:04

If the map contains the key, then the value for this key is your gradeList. Just add this line under else if ( examList.containsKey(courseID)) {:

gradeList = examList.get(courseID);

Note that naming a map examList is pretty confusing. Why not examMap? Also note that you could just use else { instead of else if ( examList.containsKey(courseID)) {: either the map contains the courseID, or it doesn't; there's no other possibility. Finally, you'll also have to fix the next line of code, because it's not correct.

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