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I am opening a popup of another site (google oauth2). The site I load will display information in the title bar, so I want to monitor the title bar to extract the information. Whenever I do this, however, the title is always blank even though the window does have a title. Here is what I am trying right now just for testing.

var authWindow = null;

function popup(url) {
    authWindow = window.open(url, 'Authentication', 'height=600,width=450');

    if (window.focus) {
        authWindow.focus();
    }

    $(authWindow.document).ready(monitorForAuthCode);
}

function monitorForAuthCode()
{
    if (authWindow && authWindow.closed == false)
    {
        var code = authWindow.document.title;

        $('#hash').html($('#hash').html() + code + '<br>');

        setTimeout(monitorForAuthCode, 1000);

    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

popup of another site (google oauth2)

You can not read the contents of another domain because of the same origin policy.

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1  
Then somebody needs to tell Google they are wrong, or I am misunderstanding what they are stating. From their OAuth2 guide at code.google.com/apis/accounts/docs/OAuth2.html for native applications they state: On many platforms, your application should be able to monitor the window title of a browser window it creates and close the window when it sees a valid response. If your platform doesn't support that, you can instruct users to copy and paste the code to your application. –  esac Nov 1 '11 at 17:39
    
@esac The trick is that this is intended for native applications, where not all of the app is subject to JavaScript's cross-origin restrictions. For example, the native-code part of your app could use native APIs to examine the titlebar. Or, if your app is using an embedded browser instance like CEF, you could configure it to disable cross-origin restrictions (make sure you only ever load your own trusted JS code into the browser pane, though). –  ytpete Aug 12 '14 at 23:19

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