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I'm trying to install doozer like this

$ goinstall github.com/ha/doozer

I get these errors.

goinstall: os: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: fmt: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: io: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: reflect: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: math: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: rand: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: url: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: net: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: sync: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: runtime: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: strings: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: sort: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: strconv: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: bytes: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: log: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: encoding/binary: go/build: package could not be found locally
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Here are examples of OSX values for GOPATH and GOPATH: github.com/go-lang-plugin-org/go-lang-idea-plugin/blob/master/… – Motin Oct 8 '14 at 8:52
    
@Motin the above link is no longer valid – Jorrit Reedijk Nov 9 '15 at 9:51
    
The file became obsolete for the project. A related issue related to OSX is found here: github.com/go-lang-plugin-org/go-lang-idea-plugin/issues/841 – Motin Nov 11 '15 at 13:34
up vote 52 down vote accepted

GOPATH is discussed in the cmd/go documentation:

The GOPATH environment variable lists places to look for Go code. On Unix, the value is a colon-separated string. On Windows, the value is a semicolon-separated string. On Plan 9, the value is a list.

GOPATH must be set to get, build and install packages outside the standard Go tree.

GOROOT is discussed in the installation instructions:

The Go binary distributions assume they will be installed in /usr/local/go (or c:\Go under Windows), but it is possible to install the Go tools to a different location. In this case you must set the GOROOT environment variable to point to the directory in which it was installed.

For example, if you installed Go to your home directory you should add the following commands to $HOME/.profile:

export GOROOT=$HOME/go
export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin

Note: GOROOT must be set only when installing to a custom location.

(updated version of Chris Bunch's answer.)

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21  
Much more comprehensive information on GOPATH is at How to Write Go Code. A grasp of the information there is required for understanding the go command, which is essential for working with Go. For example the use of goinstall in the OP should now be go get. – Sonia Jun 1 '12 at 15:45
3  
Also note the actual install path of go. For example, in a default homebrew setup, homebrew will install go in /usr/local/Cellar/go/. In this case the export path should be set with export GOROOT=/usr/local/Cellar/go/{version} and export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin. – countfloortiles Mar 4 '13 at 16:32
4  
I had to do export GOROOT=/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.2/libexec/ to get mine working with brew. – Steven Soroka Feb 7 '14 at 21:32

GOPATH is discussed here:

The GOPATH Environment Variable

GOPATH may be set to a colon-separated list of paths inside which Go code, package objects, and executables may be found.

Set a GOPATH to use goinstall to build and install your own code and external libraries outside of the Go tree (and to avoid writing Makefiles).

And GOROOT is discussed here:

$GOROOT The root of the Go tree, often $HOME/go. This defaults to the parent of the directory where all.bash is run. If you choose not to set $GOROOT, you must run gomake instead of make or gmake when developing Go programs using the conventional makefiles.

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so if I have go installed at ~/projects/go, what should the values of the variable be to find os, fmt, etc? – jshen Nov 1 '11 at 21:48
1  
So where does Go install when you sudo apt-get install golang? – weberc2 Jan 11 '13 at 1:30
5  
@weberc2 if you run go env you should see that information, for me it was /usr/lib/go/ – Andre Feb 4 '13 at 18:38

Here is a my simple setup:

directory for go related things: ~/programming/go
directory for go compiler/tools: ~/programming/go/go-1.4
directory for go software      : ~/programming/go/packages

GOROOT, GOPATH, PATH are set as following:

export GOROOT=/home/user/programming/go/go-1.4
export GOPATH=/home/user/programming/go/packages
export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin:$GOPATH/bin

So, in short:

GOROOT is for compiler/tools that comes from go installation.
GOPATH is for your own go projects / 3rd party libraries (downloaded with "go get").

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I read the go help gopath docs and was still incredibly confused, but found this little nugget from another go doc page:

The GOPATH environment variable specifies the location of your workspace. It is likely the only environment variable you'll need to set when developing Go code.

http://golang.org/doc/code.html#GOPATH

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As mentioned above:

The GOPATH environment variable specifies the location of your workspace.

For Windows, this worked for me (in Ms-dos window):

set GOPATH=D:\my_folder_for_go_code\

This creates a GOPATH variable that Ms-dos recognizes when used as follows:

cd %GOPATH%
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The GOPATH should not point to the Go installation, but rather to your workspace (see https://golang.org/doc/code.html#GOPATH). Whenever you install some package with go get or go install, it will land within the GOPATH. That is why it warns you, that you most definitely do not want random packages from the internet to be dumped into your official installation.

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If you are using the distro go, you should point to where the include files are, for example:

$ rpm -ql golang | grep include /usr/lib/golang/include

(This is for Fedora 20)

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