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Some strange behavior with PHP today:

$ds = array('2011-10-28', '2011-10-29', '2011-10-30', '2011-10-31','2011-11-01');
for($i=0; $i<count($ds); $i++) {
  print_r($ds[$i].' '.strtotime($ds[$i])."\n");
  if ($i < count($ds)-1) {
    print_r(abs(strtotime($ds[$i+1]) - strtotime($ds[$i]))."\n");
  }
}

Output:

2011-10-28 1319756400
86400
2011-10-29 1319842800
86400
2011-10-30 1319929200
90000
2011-10-31 1320019200
86400
2011-11-01 1320105600

Can anyone explain the anomalous 90 thousand between 30th and 31st?

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3  
Did your timezone encounter any daylight savings changes or similar? You gained an hour... –  Michael Berkowski Nov 1 '11 at 17:53
    
I don't get that on my php 5.3 install. Does your PHP have an old/outdated daylight savings time table? The different is 3600 seconds, which is 1 hour. That usually means a DST boundary was crossed. –  Marc B Nov 1 '11 at 17:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

90000 seconds is 25 hours – a 25 hour day can mean only one thing... The clocks were put back for the end of daylight saving time.

Certainly in the UK (I don't know about elsewhere) that happened on Sunday morning, with the result that the 30th was a 25-hour day.

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Doh! Thanks :-) –  EoghanM Nov 1 '11 at 17:56

It looks like this is an additional hour due to the change in daylight savings time:

90000 = 25 * 60 * 60
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For proper conversion you should add to the date the string " +00" (UTC time zone).
For example strtotime("2011-10-30 +00");

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