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Im building my own android app, but im kinda stuck at the login part. Now I know how I can send my username & password just like plaintext via SSL to my own API, however, this is ofcourse not the most secure solution.

I was wondering if any of you guys had some suggestions for me to try (with an eye on security), the app is still in development (the development actually just begun) so anything can be changed or implemented (same for API).

Regards

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your server has a real certificate, this is secure because SSL is encrypting it.

You will need to update the authentication process to slow down brute force attacks(ie lockout after 5 wrong logins)

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great, thank you. –  xorinzor Nov 1 '11 at 19:06
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In addition, NEVER store passwords in plain text. Always store an encrypted password. Have the password encrypt locally and then send the encrypted password to your API where you can compare the two. –  MrZander Nov 1 '11 at 19:55
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Depending on the client-server communication, you could implement a challenge-response where the server issues a salt value that is prepended to the password as entered by the user before hashing.

Example:

  • User creates account with username "BobbyUser" with password "CleverBobby"

Login Operation

  • User connects to server and requests the salt for "BobbyUser"
  • Server returns the salt "QBX123"
  • User sends hash_function("QBX123" + "CleverBobby")

This approach really isn't useful unless you are encrypting your passwords with a symmetric key instead of a 1 way hash (which will have it's own issues), that way the salt value doesn't need to be stored and can be generated on the fly, otherwise it is equally susceptible to replay attacks, just harder to read.

That said, l_39217_l's answer is correct, easier and probably safer.

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Im indeed going with l_39217_l's answer, thanks for your opinion though, Maybe in the future it'll help ;) –  xorinzor Nov 2 '11 at 21:36
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