Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Questions

There are actually two related questions:

  1. Should I create a ViewModel for each page?
  2. If you do not have problems in creating a single ViewModel class for the two pages (Create.cshtml and Edit.cshtml) how can I validate the ViewModel in different ways (depending on the page that is being used)

Source

ViewModel

public class ProjectViewModel
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Url { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

Edit.cshtml

@using BindSolution.ViewModel.Project
@model ProjectViewModel
@{
    ViewBag.Title = Model.Name;
}

@Html.EditorForModel()

Create.cshtml

@using BindSolution.ViewModel.Project
@model ProjectViewModel
@{
    ViewBag.Title = "New Project";
}

@Html.EditorForModel()

ProjectValidator.cs

public class ProjectValidator : AbstractValidator<ProjectViewModel>
{
    private readonly IProjectService _projectService;

    public ProjectValidator(IProjectService projectService)
    {
        _projectService = projectService;

        RuleFor(p => p.Name)
           .NotEmpty().WithMessage("required field")

           /*The validation should be made only if the page is Create.cshtml. That is, if you are creating a new project.*/
           .When(p => p.??) //Problem Here!!

           .Must(n => !_projectService.Exist(n)).WithMessage("name already exists");

        RuleFor(p => p.Url)
            .NotEmpty().WithMessage("required field");
    }
}

Note that if the user is editing an existing project, validation of the property name should not be done again.

ProjectController.cs > Edit method

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(Guid projectID, ProjectViewModel model)
{
    var project = _projectService.Repository.Get(projectID);

    if (ModelState.IsValid && TryUpdateModel(project))
    {
        _projectService.Repository.Attach(project);
        if (_projectImageWrap.Create(project) && _projectService.Repository.Save() > 0)
            return AjaxRedirect("Index");
    }

    return View(model);
}

Notes

If I create a ViewModel for each page, there is a duplication of code since pages have the same properties.

Add a property on the ViewModel indicating what page it is being displayed does not solve my problem as to instantiate the ViewModel, I use AutoMapper.

To validate the data, I use FluentValidator.

Thank you all for your help!

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

My understanding is that there isn't a 1:1 correlation between ViewModels and Views. Oftentimes you will have a View that will not require a ViewModel to go alongside with it.

You will want to create a ViewModel if and only if you need a Model absolutely paralleled and tailored to a specific View. This will not be the case 100% of the time.

share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree! What about the second question? how to ignore the rule if the user is editing the project in my ProjectValidator class –  Ridermansb Nov 1 '11 at 19:57
add comment

When the functionality / use case /validation is different between the pages I use different models. If its the exact same besides the presence of an ID or something similar I use the same model, and its also possible to just use the same view if the differences are pretty minor.

Since your validation is different, if I were doing it I would create two different models so that I could use the out of the box DataAnnotations, with your validation though it may not be required. You could also on the edit model have a readonly property for name since its not editable any longer.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not understand what he meant. I have a single ViewModel to Edit.cshtml and Create.cshtml and a class to validate this ViewModel. My problem is how to ignore a rule if the user is editing the project. About creating a ViewModel for each page, I do not feel comfortable with it, would be duplicating code. –  Ridermansb Nov 1 '11 at 19:55
1  
Its only duplicating code if the code does the same thing in both places, which it does not. You can always use a base model class for the shared functionality. –  Paul Tyng Nov 1 '11 at 20:22
add comment

For me the same object must have the same validation on every time, in main to ensure the consistence of the object, independently if it was created or edited.

i think that you should create only one validation, and edit your "exists" method to pass to verify if it is a new object or the current object in repository.

share|improve this answer
1  
Charles, the validation is for editing and creation. Using the concept of separation of responsibility, I created a class that is responsible for validating the ViewModel. The question is, how to use the same validation but if a new record, ignore certain rule. (As listed in the code above). –  Ridermansb Nov 1 '11 at 19:47
add comment

Personally, I don't have a problem with 2 view models, especially if (as Paul Tyng suggested) you use a base class for the fields that are common to edit and create scenarios.

However, if you really only want a single view model then you would either need to:

  • add a flag to the view model and use the When() method in your validator. Note though that this will not generate the appropriate client-side only validation
  • define a second validator and invoke the appropriate one from the controller (i.e. instead of the "automatic" validation)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.