Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a class,

abstract class Parent {
    abstract function foo();
}

class Child extends Parent {
    function foo($param) {
        //stuff
    }
}

I get an error because the abstract declaration doesn't have any parameters but the child's implementation of it does. I am making an adapter parent class with abstract functions that, when implemented, could have a variable amount of parameters depending on the context of the child class. Is there any structured way I can overcome this, or do I have to use func_get_args?

share|improve this question
1  
What's the point of abstract class if you have classes that differ from the protocol defined by abstract class? –  Furicane Nov 1 '11 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to use func_get_args if you want to have variable arguments in your function. Note that func_get_args gets all the arguments passed to a PHP function.

You can however enforce a minimum number of arguments to be passed to the function by including corresponding parameters to them.

For example: Say that you have a function that you wish to call with at least 1 argument. Then just write the following:

function foo($param) {
    //stuff
    $arg_list = func_get_args();
}

Now that you have this definition of foo(), you have to at least call it with one argument. You can also choose to pass a variable number of arguments n where n > 1, and receive those arguments through func_get_args(). Keep in mind that $arg_list above will also contain a copy of $param as its first element.

share|improve this answer

PHP does this to protect polymorphism. Any object of the inherited type should be usable as if they were of the parent type.

Consider the following classes:

abstract class Animal {
    abstract function run();
}

class Horse extends Animal {
    function run($speed) {
        // Clever code that makes that horse run at a specific speed
    }
}

... and the following code:

function makeAnimalRun($animal) {
    $animal->run();
}

$someAnimal = new Animal();
$someHorse = new Horse();

makeAnimalRun($someAnimal);  // Works fine
makeAnimalRun($someHorse);   // Will fail because Horse->run() requires a $speed 

makeAnimalRun should be able to execute run on any instance of Animal and any of it's inherited classes, but since Horse's implementation of run requires a $speed parameter, the $animal->run() call in makeAnimalRun will fail.

Fortunately, there's an easy fix to this. You just need to provide a default value to the parameter in the overridden method.

class Horse extends Animal {
    function run($speed = 5) {
        // Clever code that makes that horse run at a specific speed
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.