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This sort of situation comes up pretty often. You loop through an array, and if some elements meet some requirement, you'd like to keep track of their indices for later. Here's what I mean:

for(i=0;i<10;++i)
{
     if(array[i] > 10)
     {
          //Keep track of this index for later use.
     }
}

The easy solution would be to create an array of 10 elements, and if say the 2nd element is greater than 10, one could do indices[i] = 1; But I feel this approach isn't that good. I'll need a large array to store this and most of the space is wasted.

In my application, I'm trying to find which bits are set in a bit array. So if bits 0 and 10 are set, I need to store these numbers for later use by the program. What's the best way to go about this?

This code needs to run on an AVR Mega and I'm using AVR-GCC so a C only solution is required.

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Why not handle every case when you first encounter it? –  BlackBear Nov 1 '11 at 19:39
    
Because the other data may not have been read in yet by the microcontroller. –  saad Nov 1 '11 at 19:45
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a bitmap: this only uses 1 bit per index, instead of 16 or 32 bits per index.

uint32_t bitmap[10] = {0}; // works for array size up to 320 elements
for(i=0;i<10;++i)
{
     if(array[i] > 10)
     {
          //Keep track of this index for later use.
          bitmap[i/32] |= (uint32_t)1 << (i%32);
     }
}

for(i=0;i<10;++i)
{
     if((bitmap[i/32] >> (i%32)) & 1)
     {
         // Later use :)
         // Put some code here
     }
}
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Nice. Talk about low memory usage. Although I see your first answer was along the same lines of what I was thinking. –  Brian McFarland Nov 1 '11 at 20:41
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If you feel that much space would be wasted by using an additional array to remember the "special" indices, try to determine exactly how much space would be wasted. Then, use a smaller array. For example, if you know that you must remember at most 4 indices, declare an array of size 4.

You can also declare a small array, not large enough to remember all indices, and run the loop that fills it several times:

int indices[4];
int number_of_indices = 0;
int i_start = 0; // array entries up to this index were already checked
while (i_start < 10) {
    for(i=i_start;i<10;++i)
    {
        if(array[i] > 10)
        {
            //Keep track of this index for "later use" below.
            indices[number_of_indices++] = i;
            // If 4 indices have been gathered, break the loop and use them
            if (number_of_indices == 4)
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    i_start = i;

    // Put "Later use" here :)
    // Do something for the list of indices gathered so far
}
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On a PC, I would say a dynamically growing linked list or stack would be best.

On a microcontroller, it's often best to use statically allocated structures so that performance is deterministic and to avoid wasting precious memory. So a fixed size FIFO that stores the index you care about (rather than a simple 1/0 status) is the way to go. Just be prepared to think about detection and graceful failure if there's an overflow OR find some way to guarantee no overflow.

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